A new interactive platform compares the resilience levels of countries to environmental and social impacts

The report compares the levels of vulnerability to conflicts and climate changes among many countries
The report compares the levels of vulnerability to conflicts and climate changes among many countries

Social conflicts and environmental change: what is the economic impact of such a mix? The answer can now be found in a new monitor launched this month by The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies, in partnership with the Clingendael Institute, during the Planetary Security Initiative Conference in The Netherlands on December 5th and 6th.

In times of international commitment to a low carbon economy transition, the study innovates by modelling the impacts of both climate change and conflict risks for countries. The indicators also aggregate items like Low Carbon Risk and Economic Resilience.

The report concludes that countries which are highly reliant on carbon intensive industries, like Australia, Russia and Iran, are more vulnerable regarding Low Carbon Risk, while African countries like Rwanda and Uganda reach a good score. On the economic resilience side, North America and Europe are leading the ranking, but countries like Kazakhstan, Botswana, Saudi Arabia and South Korea present a very low level of vulnerability.

Countries which are highly reliant on carbon intensive industries are more vulnerable regarding Low Carbon Risk
Countries which are highly reliant on carbon intensive industries are more vulnerable regarding Low Carbon Risk

According to the consolidated report, the least vulnerable countries are:

  1. Finland
  2. Denmark
  3. Norway
  4. Japan
  5. Netherlands
  6. Sweden
  7. Australia
  8. Slovenia
  9. New Zealand
  10. Austria

The aggregate monitor shows that the most vulnerable countries are in the Middle East and North Africa, due to their conflict history and its role in driving vulnerability. Peacemaking efforts, together with an economic diversification towards a low carbon economy, can drive sustainable development for the most affected regions.

The interactive tool can be found on the Planetary Security website

Link to the full report

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