world

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Horyou is launching the website www.GreatDoingGood.com, a website dedicated to gathering testimonials from global citizens sharing their views on why it’s great to do good. The campaign supports the Social Good work promoted by the Horyou platform which has over one thousand non-profit organizations on the network sharing positivity everyday. The website presents 64 videos where citizens of the world in various cities answer the question: Why is it great to do good? The aim of the campaign is to inspire citizens of the world to support and spread positive actions. To encourage participation, a game has been established so that once the campaign has a global reach, a winner will be chosen to share $3000 for a personal social good project or action and a non-profit organisation or cause from the Horyou platform. Watch the promo video here !

WHY #GREATDOINGGOOD

Great Doing Good is a campaign to spread positivity and good actions. The idea is that there is a lot of different ways to make a positive impact in this world and everyone can do this through simple actions. The campaign supports the Social Good work promoted on the Horyou platform, where NGOs and members connect on a daily basis to share good news. The campaign takes this positivity beyond the platform and to the streets of different cities of the world by interviewing their citizens on the meaning of doing good. Ultimately, the game prize will serve to support the winner’s personal social good project(s) or action and an NGO of his/her choice so that concrete good actions can come from it.

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HOW IT WORKS

Anyone aged 18 and up can play. By visiting the website participants watch and Light their favorite videos. At any given moment there is a “winning video” amongst them. When the participant Lights the winning video, he/she automatically enters the draw to win $3,000. When the counter on the top left of the screen reaches 1 million Lights, a winner will be chosen from the draw and wins the $3,000. From the $3,000; 1,500 for a personal social good action and 1,500 dollars to donate to an NGO of their choice on the Horyou platform. Horyou platform members and organizations participate with their profiles and their existing Lights. If you are not yet a member of Horyou, you can participate using the five Horyou Lights available on the website. To obtain more Lights and be eligible for the global draw you will have to register to the Horyou Platform.

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THE CHALLENGE

Horyou is organizing a social media challenge in support of this campaign. The #GreatDoingGood challenge involves people sharing a good action on social media and challenging their friends to do the same. We invite everyone to participate through the Horyou App, Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and show why it’s great to do good. Simply take a photo/video of a good action you witness or do, share it via the HoryouApp, Twitter, Instagram and/or Facebook, challenge/tag two friends to have them post their own good actions and have them tag their friends to keep the challenge going. Finally, always include in your post #GreatDoingGood and the website www.GreatDoingGood.com.

Example - good action (1)

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Britta Holmberg is project director for The World Childhood Foundation. Located in Germany, Brazil, Sweden and the USA, the foundation’s goal is to prevent exploitation and abuse of Children. Over 100 projects across the world are implemented and supported by the foundation because every child has the right to safety, happiness, playfulness and curiosity in life. Mrs. Holmberg is involved in various projects worldwide; here she tells us about some of the success stories, and what to dream, inspire and act means in changing a child’s world one project at a time. — by Amma Aburam

Have you always wanted to be an advocate for Children’s rights? How did it come about?

For me, the interest and awareness about children’s rights has developed step-by-step. My first contact with children in vulnerable situations was when I worked at summer camps for children from the Chernobyl area, some of whom were living in institutions because of their hearing deficiencies. I remember visiting an institution in Belarus where deaf children were supposed to practice “hearing” and how so much of their education was led by teachers who did not know sign- language. Visits at several orphanages in Eastern Europe in the nineties made it very clear to me that these children were deprived of their childhood and that better options needed to be developed.

What are some of the key ongoing projects at the World Childhood Foundation? What is their impact?

Childhood supports around 100 projects around the world, all of which are important for the communities where they are implemented. I am especially proud when we take a risk and fund something that we believe in but where we cannot know from the start how it will turn out. There are many key projects that have had an impact also on national level, for example a program for HIV-positive mothers in Russia which led to a complete change in approach from the local authorities that could give the mothers better support and information which resulted in less children being abandoned at birth. We are also supporting a cluster of programs in Siem Rep in Cambodia that together not only can identify children who have been sexually abused at an early stage but also provide them and their families with qualified support. We have funded a number of parenting programs in South Africa, which have given thousands of children a safer and more loving childhood but also contributed to shed the light on locally developed low-cost programs.

Play is an integral part of the projects the World Childhood Foundation supports
Play is an integral part of the projects the World Childhood Foundation supports

What are your best/favorite success stories of the impact the foundation has had on the lives of children?

There are so many stories! Childhood has a very close contact with the partners that we support on the ground and we visit each project twice a year. We often meet with beneficiaries as well and each of them has their unique story. One meeting that made a strong impression on me was with a number of fathers in South Africa whose sons participated in a program for high-risk youth – who were on the edge of being removed from their families and/or expelled from school. Part of the program is working with the parents and making an effort to find at least one positive father-figure for the boys. The way these fathers described the transformation from being a distant, quite authoritarian father to one that actually starts to listen to their child and show affection and how much the loving relationship with their child now means to them was such a wonderful experience – not the least since absent and violent father are one of the key problems in South Africa – and loving, present fathers one of the key factors for change. There are also so many stories of resilience. I remember one 15 year old girl in Thailand that used to work on the streets – begging and scavenging – to support her uncle and aunt that she lived with as well as her siblings. With help from our partner organization she could return to school, the aunt got help to start a small business and the girl was now receiving vocational training to contribute to the family’s income. She had such dignity and strength despite a very difficult situation.

What in your opinion are the three building blocks in implementing children’s rights within communities?

One is simply to see and treat children as human beings! That might seem evident but in my experience it is far from being the case. In so many situations we treat children as a separate category that we do not listen to or scream at or humiliate in a way that we would never do with adults. Number two is being humble, starting with trying to understand the challenges and possibilities in each community – not thinking that we can come in from the outside and provide the solutions. Support the local capacity and local solutions. Number three is skipping the idea of quick fixes. Change takes time. If you want to get to the roots of problems, you will need to have a holistic approach and long-term perspective.

Early childhood development project in South Africa
Early childhood development project in South Africa

What are some of the challenges you face while working for Children’s rights and how do you address them?

One challenge that we struggle with is well-meaning people who want to “rescue” children, often with a charity approach that puts the helper in focus rather than the child or the family they claim they want to help. I am so sad to see that so much resources, energy and personal investments are spent on the wrong types of projects that sometimes are even harmful to children. One example is orphanage tourism and volunteerism where children are turned into tourist attractions and are easy targets for people who want to exploit them. Since people love funding orphanages it means that in some areas that is the only option available for poor families who cannot afford to put their child in school. Skewed funding leads to children being separated from the families that would actually be able to take care of them if some support was available that did not require that the child is placed in an orphanage. There are plenty of good intentions related to children at risk – but if you do not combine that with knowledge you will at best not contribute to any sustainable change but at worst actually make the situation worse.

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 to 10 years? Any ideals?

I have a wonderful job and am happy to continue doing what I am doing for quite some time. If I get tired of travelling as much as I do I would love to focus on research and maybe evaluations of programs.

What does our mantra Dream, Act and Inspire mean to you personally and professionally?

For me, the mantra Dream, Act and Inspire means that we all have an important role to play to raise awareness about children’s rights and that we need to step up and do things that we might not really dare to do, but need to do anyway.

ryanscott_profile-2Ryan Scott is the CEO and Founder at Causecast, the leading cause integration company. The platform offers workforce matching donations, volunteering including dollars for doers, disaster response, and custom campaigns. He is the Founder of The Impact and Educational Sections of the Huffington Post. Ryan Scott has served as Board Member of the Taproot Foundation. He has been a game platform developer. Ryan also holds a patent from the NetCreations, Inc., a company he co-founded. — by Elena Tarassenko

Can you please speak about the need you see present for improved employee engagement in volunteer work and corporate social responsibility?

The world’s leading companies in 2015 understand the need for employee volunteer programs and the majority offer some sort of opportunities for their employees to give back. Engaging one’s employees in community impact isn’t just a nice thing to do; it’s an essential part of today’s bottom line. But it’s not enough to simply offer a program and assume that your employees will gratefully line up to get involved. Too many companies don’t put forth the effort to foster employee engagement in their programs, and the result is that participation rates are typically low. This is a lost opportunity with many ripples of consequences. Corporate volunteerism presents a powerful opportunity to transform the relationship that companies have with their communities, employees and stakeholders, and it’s vital that companies treat this part of their business with the same degree of care and thought as the rest of their operations.

Explain the new pro-social model for capitalists and why this theory is important.

In the past, creating economic value was purely the domain of corporations while social value creation was left to nonprofits, and never the twain shall meet. But what we’ve found is when corporations and nonprofits work together – combining a company’s unique ability to leverage capital with a nonprofit’s talents in working on social problems – we have something new, and we call it shared value. The magic of shared value is scale. We can finally get solutions at the scale that is required to actually solve those problems. I believe that by leveraging the power of capitalism in the service of causes and stretching the skills of your employees, we will see a historic shift to a world where, ultimately, businesses will compete with each other not only to make the most profit, but to do the most good. That’s the world we’re working toward.

Screen Shot 2015-09-25 at 2.11.45 PM How does your platform succeed in engaging employees’ corporations?

I think that only when companies demonstrate economic incentive to creating social value will we be able to reach the scale we need to solve our problems, and I’m honored to be a part of helping enable companies to craft and execute these programs. The economic incentive will not come without seeing real impact – within communities and within the companies themselves, and impact won’t happen without robust engagement. At Causecast, we believe that engagement in volunteering and giving comes from a social, mobile and interactive experience. That’s why we designed our platform to foster a real-time connection between employees and their peers, their community and the company. Everything is designed to be easy, highly secure, automated and engaging, making involvement so seamless, trusted and fun that employees want more. Ultimately, the volunteer experience needs to feel rewarding for employees, administrators and nonprofits – that’s how you build on positive experiences to create a corporate culture of giving back.

If you could summarize what corporations have to gain from using a platform such as Causecast in a few phrases, what would they be?

For innovative growth companies, Causecast provides giving and volunteering technology solutions to reach the highest levels of employee engagement and social impact. In contrast to the sluggish, forms-based, top-down administrator focus that has historically dominated employee giving and volunteering mindset, our unique technology and one-on-one support model enables companies to build high-impact employee-led programs that are globally meaningful, locally relevant, and easy to manage – for a far lower total cost of ownership than traditional solutions.

Where do you believe senior executives have the most impact in terms of promoting social impact and investment within corporations?

The more that senior leaders can point to the bottom line benefits of corporate social responsibility, the more investment they’ll see their companies making in these areas. What we’ve started to see happen is more and more of our clients realize they want to invest in our system for recruiting and retention purposes, not just for PR. Recruiting and retention are the real business needs they can measure and something all businesses are struggling with right now. Ultimately, because of financial incentives, retaining top-level employees who are involved with the company’s corporate social responsibility programs will increase giving and the impact they’re going to have on the world. It’s also very important that senior executives demonstrate their leadership and commitment to their philanthropy initiatives by participating in them alongside their employees.

Causecast's team volunteer day for Enrich LA in May 2015.
Causecast’s team volunteer day for Enrich LA in May 2015.

What do you see as the connection between working on boards of nonprofits and the Causecast initiative?

Board service offers unique advantages as a form of volunteering that should influence anyone interested in their personal and professional growth as well as their ability to make a difference. No matter what your professional field or expertise, everyone should step up to the experience of serving on a nonprofit board for its untold positive benefits. That’s why one project I’m particularly enthusiastic about is giving all of our clients’ employees the opportunity to get involved with nonprofit board service, which is typically an opportunity exclusive to VPs and executives. There’s an organization that we’re working with for this project called CariClub.

What about Horyou’s Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum (SIGEF) is most interesting to you?

I’m very excited to see what strategic collaborations and powerful ideas emerge from SIGEF 2015, particularly within the “Technological Evolution for Social Good” theme. I’ve made that my life’s work, first as the co-founder of NetCreations, which paved the way for opt-in email marketing, and now as the CEO and founder of Causecast. It’s not easy to pull off an event like this on a global scale, but I think the world is in desperate need of it. I’m looking forward to the meaningful change that will inevitably result from this exciting social experiment.

Rachel_Hutchisson

Rachel Hutchisson is a corporate responsibility & philanthropy guru. 24 years at Blackbaud led her to grow a passion and true talent for developing and implementing strategic philanthropy and corporate social responsibility in her company. Then she took all that knowledge and experience to create “Business doing Good”, a website she started in order to give advice to businesses that wanted to build a give back function. Rachel believes that “good is for everyone” and that the public discourse and mindsets are being changed thanks to the growth of social good campaigns, initiatives and talks by leaders in many industries. Horyou got to ask her key questions about her career, growing a sustainable business culture and how she sees the future.

Have you always wanted to be an advocate for Corporate Citizenship & Philanthropy? How did it come about?

When I joined the workforce with a master’s degree in journalism, I thought I was headed to a career in communications, perhaps for a college or a healthcare center (which is interesting because these are some of the kinds of organizations my company serves). I ended up meeting some interesting people from Blackbaud, a then 130-person technology company providing software to nonprofit organizations, and was offered a job which I thought would be an interesting challenge for a few years. Over the past 24 years, the company has grown tremendously, and I with it, taking on a series of newly formed roles and ultimately formally establishing our strategic philanthropy and corporate social responsibility function. I describe my role as working at the intersection of nonprofits and corporate good, which is especially meaningful for a company where we power the business of philanthropy through the solutions we offer. I walked in the door so many years ago not realizing the incredible power and reach of the philanthropic sector. Now, I look back realizing that my parents raised me to be a part of this world of social good, modeling volunteerism and compassion through their own work in the community, work that I didn’t realize could lead to a profession. Now, my life and my work are intertwined.

How did the idea for Business doing good come about and what is its purpose?

Business Doing Good, the website I launched on #GivingTuesday 2013 to offer advice to small businesses interested in building a give back function into their firms, was born out of my own experiences. When I took on the challenge of building the philanthropy and corporate social responsibility function at Blackbaud, I looked to the broader business world to learn the best practices. However, the examples and resources I found were mainly for very large corporates with operations around the world. So I pieced together my own plans and learned along the way. With a really good operation now in place, I thought it was important to give back by sharing insights and experience, making it easier for those who followed. It’s also important to know that I have a fundamental belief that “good is for everyone,” (individuals, nonprofits, government, small businesses or corporates). So I was seeking, by making the advice on the site clear and easy to understand, to empower anyone in business who wanted to give back.

What are your best/favorite success stories from creating and building give back programs?

My favorite success stories over the years are always about people, whether they are our employees who are engaging in the community or the people we are serving through our philanthropy. I am hugely proud of Camp Blackbaud, a STEM-focused camp where staff from our Products team introduce disadvantaged middle school kids to programming and careers in tech. They walk in the door thinking technology is something unreachable to them and leave saying they’ll be back to work for us after they graduate from college. That’s the goal, to help Charleston Promise Neighborhood (our nonprofit partner) open these kids’ eyes to education and the role it can play in changing their lives. The kids are great, smart, lively and so enthusiastic. Our people love leading the camp, especially how they can share their skills (programmers, usability designers, quality assurance, etc., not being skills nonprofits typically ask for in volunteers).

Camp Blackbaud
]7 Camp Blackbaud

What in your opinion are the three building blocks for a company to establish solid corporate citizenship and philanthropic practice?

1) Vocal CEO Support – Having vocal support from the very top of the company is essential to building a solid corporate social responsibility practice. There is absolutely nothing that compares to a CEO’s ability to make citizenship, service and giving a priority from a corporate level, across the management team and with individual employees. Your CEO needs to be your strongest advocate and be willing to open doors or ensure you are involved in the conversations where your work can truly make a difference.

2) Partnerships with key leaders in the company – corporate social responsibility teams are traditionally small but span across entire operations and locations. For this reason, you will need strong partnerships with people who understand how your collective work will deepen their success. Key leaders should include those leading talent acquisition, HR, culture, corporate marketing, business units or company sites. Working together to determine how what you can offer will help them succeed is at the heart of corporate social responsibility.

3) Engaging employees as advocates and a key audience – corporate social responsibility is important inside and outside the company, and employees are both key agents of telling the story and a key audience to engage. Design your program to be one that helps bring good people to the company who want to engage and who, by engaging, are more likely to stay and thrive, telling their own stories. Make your giving and service a differentiator that makes you an employer of choice, one your people are proud to speak about.

We live in a culture of consumerism as opposed to a giving back culture, how do we slowly change that mindset? Is it really possible to combine the two?

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Yes, I not only believe but see every day at Blackbaud that it is possible to combine a culture of doing good with doing well. We can change those with a purely consumer mindset by what we do as people, how we give back and the priorities we set, and how we lead the organizations where we pursue our careers. Also, there are many positive messages in the world about how to advance good. I like to say that my kids are hearing from their president, their priest, their teachers and their parents that they should give back, and these messages are sinking in. The number of degrees available in nonprofit management, philanthropy and social innovation are a sign of this positive shift, as is the growing understanding that you can bring socially minded philosophies into the business world.

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 to 10 years? Any ideals?

In five to ten years, I see myself working in the middle of a cause and an organization that I’m proud to champion and feel driven to help succeed. There is so much more to do, and the idea of how social good can help drive positive change brings much promise.

You joined Horyou, what does our mantra Dream, Act and Inspire mean to you personally and professionally?

I never dared to dream that I would end up with such a wonderful, fulfilling career focused on good. But now that I am here and looking at how else I can add value, I see this mantra as a responsibility, a charge to make sure I do dream, I continue to act, and I always take the time to inspire. Finally, I would say that it reminds me of my personal commitment to mentor as many women in my community as I can. There are a few people who helped me immeasurably on my own journey, and I strongly believe it is my duty to pay that forward.

By Amma Aburam

    Almir-Surui1

    In 2007, it hit the worldwide media that Google was supporting an Amazonian tribe to track illegal deforestation using technology and the Internet. It was a first and impressive move for this autochthon people, as no tribe had yet used the Internet and technology to speak up or defend its forest. The tribe is the Surui people and today its leader, Almir Surui, travels the world to conferences and Forums to speak about the state of deforestation in Brazil, his home. Horyou sat with him and talked about his humble mission to change attitudes and promote environmental, social and economic responsibility.

    Version Francaise disponible ici Versão em português disponível aqui

    The image of autochthon communities around the world is evolving. Where would you like to see it heading in 20 – 30 years?

    Our role is to improve the public’s awareness so that we can move towards a world that progresses responsibly. This implies environmental, social and economic responsibility by way of using technology as a tool to construct and modify the development models that we have today. I advocate a development that puts humanity first, before quality of life. With our work, I would like that in 20 years the world has started following the steps we put in place today.

    In our modern western society, selfish individualism is a source of motivation, a reason to live. What is your perspective on that attitude?

    I believe that individualism is a factor that can and is destroying society. From my cultural vision, I think that collective thinking, collective rights, collective respect can save us from this mentality. I don’t see any other way, if we have varying opinions, we should at least be able to reach a consensus, find a device that can show us the way to work with each other, each with his own capacity.

    Almir Surui (right)
    ]4 Almir Surui (right)

    More concretely, within the Surui tribe, if a child or an adult for example acts selfishly what is the response of the clan?

    Back home, a child would never act selfishly (laughs); we don’t have that misfortune. If I, the father, am selfish, then my child would learn from me to be selfish too (laughs). As parents, we need to set examples in terms of home education. If my son sees me act in a nonsensical manner, he won’t understand and will want to do the same thing. We are generally easily influenced by the examples and advice of our parents, which is why we must be careful with the way we act.

    As far as adults are concerned, everyone chooses their own problems; that is how we approach things in my society. If I do something wrong, this fault will come back to haunt me. Whatever one chooses to be, there will be consequences. Those who harm others for example, it is not up to us to enact justice, time will take care of that. If I myself punish this person, I will be staining myself with his crime and I will be an accomplice to his crime. The person who does a lot of harm will not be applauded during an assembly; everyone will ask “Who is this man” and his own shame will be the death of him.

    I believe that nothing is engraved in granite; what we must do or say is not pre-defined. Consensus is our indicator on what must change and be corrected to reach our objectives. If I disagree and turn my back on negotiating, we will never be able to correct our mistakes and progress towards a better future together.

    You are known for having allowed the Surui tribe to transition into the modern world, more specifically through the internet, can you tell us about this?

    In the past few years, I have analyzed and observed the suffering of my people. I then decided that my people, the Surui, will not be victim to these modern procedures, that we would get involved in discussions, as well as concerns and solutions offered by the rest of the world in regards to our forest and our knowledge of it. I then needed to define the method by which to do this and so we needed technology and the Internet. Firstly, people had to know who we were and where we live, be acquainted with our occupations and aware of our solutions to this common problem. Information started to flow from a place it had never come from: namely the people living in these forests. We began to understand how we could express ourselves in international debates. For example, when we participate in an event, the people we were invited by, we often meet them at another forum; thanks to the Internet, this is a network that we have to maintain to come up with and share responsible solutions.

    Almir-Surui3

    In 2007, an article published in various media, disclosed that an Amazon tribe had the support of Google to track illegal deforestation; this was your tribe. Do you believe it worked?

    Yes, it worked: the Surui territory is today mapped out in 3D on Google Earth. In addition to this, they help and train us to use their tools: create a map, post on Youtube, etc. And it is we who went looking for them, not the other way round. It helps us better communicate with the Brazilian government and the whole world about deforestation (through precise and documented complaints). If the government would play its part, we would not have to be doing this.

    If you had a message of hope to give to the world, what would it be?

    You have to believe you are important; we have to believe we are important. You have to believe that you are the one that will change the world because it does not change on it’s own. It is a path to change that we must build together so that we can hope to build a better world for all.

    Written by Vincent Magnenat Translated by Amma Aburam

    Horyou Documentary Screening

    A REFLECTION:

    “Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.” -Kofi Annan

    ACTIONS: Recently, the Horyou team started a new initiative in the United States by visiting universities in New York and California. The first school visited was the Tisch School of The Arts at NYU, followed by Chapman University and the School of Social Work at the University of Southern California (downtown LA and Orange County). It was very rewarding to experience the understanding and enthusiasm of students regarding the importance of social networking with a purpose.

    California Presentation

    We had the opportunity to discuss and share different views on the use of social media in todays modern World. Questions such as: How can the creation of positive content facilitate the process of social commitment via social networking? To what extent is social networking creating a positive impact in society, locally and globally? Students were diving in! They shared their thoughts and aspirations, but they also discussed the challenges and opportunities ahead when using technology for good.

    THE FUTURE: The sharing of knowledge, exchanging of ideas, conversation starting, and the promotion of social good are a fundamental part of what Horyou promotes. In the coming year, Horyou is planning to explore the world of academia by sparking innovative conversations among students and youth regarding social networking with a purpose, when applied to a cross-cultural setting in different fields of expertise.

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    Each presentation aims to explore this concept, while creating space for open discussions and the exchange of ideas, creativity, and much more. Horyou wants to encourage younger generations, to become involved with technology in constructive ways, while promoting and reciprocating knowledge and sharing ideas.

    MORE TO COME!

    Horyou considers this initiative a valuable exchange. Therefore, the team will continue on a global sphere, bringing social networking with a purpose to the classroom. More news to come!

    Horyou Screening California

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