Sustainable Development Goals

The UN Sustainable Development Goal number 7 aims to provide clean, affordable and reliable energy for all, to further inclusion, opportunity and empowerment.

Photo: UNDP India

Almost 200 years after the invention of the first electric motor, there still are 1 billion people with no access to electricity. Half of them are in sub-Saharan countries, most in urban areas. It’s ironic that Africa, a region so rich in natural resources, always mentioned as the future test site for clean energy, still has a considerable part of its population in the dark.

It is both a wonderful opportunity and a threat – without clean and affordable energy, our future is at risk. How many innovators are losing the opportunity to put their ideas into practice? For how many more years are we to keep burning fossil fuels to provide our populations with energy? For how long will we continue to consume power without even thinking about its sources or effects on the environment?

According to the last UNDP account and despite all international agreements, the renewable share in final energy consumption has grown modestly from 2012 to 2014 from 17,9% to 18,3%, most of it from water, solar and wind-generated power. In the most developed and largest energy-consuming countries, however, an effort has been made – especially by reducing power consumption through greater efficiency in industry. The challenge is to increase this share even more, especially in sectors like heat and transport which account for 80% of global energy consumption.

Progress still falls short, but there are many remarkable initiatives in large and small scale that give hope and inspiration. One of the active organizations on our Horyou platform, Geres, Group for the Environment, Renewable Energy and Solidarity, is a French NGO that works with innovative and sustainable development projects around Europe-Mediterranean, West Africa, South-East Asia and Central Asia. From building electrified zones in Mali through to developing bioclimatic solutions in houses and farms in the Indian Himalayas, Geres has empowered communities for more than 40 years.

Other initiatives were presented during SIGEF 2016 in Marrakesh – one of the SIGEF Awards runner-ups was Pocket Rocket, a company focused on energy saving. Its products and services help to reduce the percentage of CO2 released in the air. Another one is Can Heat, a project which facilitates the manufacturing of solar water heater panels through the reuse of waste materials.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote clean and affordable energy in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

Barcelona is hosting its 8th annual Corporate Social Responsibility Week, an event which connects the public sector to companies and non-profit organizations to discuss the recent developments in CSR. Horyou team has visited the venue and reports on some success stories.

8th CSR Week Barcelona took place from 14th to 18th November

What can a food bank do about global warming? Why should a healthcare and beauty products industry career coach unemployed women? Those are merely signs that CSR is pushing companies to go beyond their backyard. We all find profit in a better world.

The 8th edition of the annual CSR Week in Barcelona was an indication that many companies are trying to run the extra mile through their environmental and social actions. On a panel titled «Conferencias Soc-Eco-Amb», held on Tuesday, four organizations from very diverse industries showcased their actions.

Miguel Ángel Trabado, Henkel Beauty and Healthcare regional head of Professional Partnership Services (PPS), shared the «Fundación Quiero Trabajo» experience inaugurated this year. The project provides hairdressing, clothing, styling and professional coaching to unemployed women, helping them to recover from a job loss and restore their self-confidence. So far, 53 women have received assessment and advice, and 71% have found a new job. «It’s important to notice that most of the work is done by volunteers, and the great majority are women as well», he said. It is a global project that has produced remarkable results in Spain, with a high rate of successful job placements.

Speaking for Metro de Madrid on its recently launched CSR Policy, in line with the 11th and 13th UN Sustainable Development Goals on Sustainable Cities and Climate Action respectively, Monica Mariscal insisted on the company’s commitment to invest in innovation and technology in order to deliver the best user travel experience. Metro de Madrid is thus reusing 80% of its consumed water and, in 2017, it will reduce by 25% its energy consumption. Insisting on the responsibility to cater for the vast diversity of its users, she disclosed that «From a social perspective, the company has a commitment to diversity, and is building accessible stations and training both employees and people with disability to better use the metro». The goal is to have 73% of all stations accessible to people with disability by 2030.

Ana Gonzales talks about the CSR and Environment projects in Caprabo

As for the national supermarket chain Caprabo and its microdonations program, it is striving to reduce food waste, as well as to support people in need. Hence, the company donate small quantities of its unsold products – a pack of eggs in which just one is broken, for instance -, to non-profit organizations or food banks. This sounds simple but it requires some logistics in relation to food preservation and employee training to send out only items that are safe for consumption. According to Ana Gonzales, in charge of CSR and Environment for Caprabo, «The program is a success as it helps to feed 788 families per year. It also reduces food waste by more than 2,000 tons».

Caprabo micro donations go to organizations like Banc dels Aliments de Barcelona, a food bank that provides 18,000 tons of food to 137,000 people in Catalonia. In addition to putting meals on needy families tables, the organization has recently signed an agreement with the public sector by which it is working on reducing CO2 emissions. According to Joan Bosch, Economic Resources Coordinator, it is an extra challenge they are happy to take. «We have changed all our lamps to LED and are looking forward to reducing our emissions by more than 2,300 tons of CO2 in 2017», he stated. It is all done thanks to volunteering work and donations, and we aim higher each year. «Poverty is more intense and chronic than ever. We cover only 27% of families in need, and we expect to improve this number and the quality of what people are eating», he added. It will be done, of course, with lower emissions and the tireless commitment to building a better society.

The 6th United Nation Sustainable Development Goal is about providing clean and safe access to the most precious liquid on earth for all.

Water and Sanitation for all. Photo: UNDP Philippines

Two years ago, a major environmental disaster struck Brazil – the liquid waste reservoir of the mining company Samarco burst, wiping out a village, killing 11 people and poisoning the waters of the Rio Doce, a water source that supplies two Brazilian states. The riverside population and fishermen have been facing difficult times since. The water is still unsafe to drink, and the iron contamination has exterminated the local fauna. Scientists predict it would take 100 years for the river to fully recover from the catastrophe. And what of the fundamental right to a safe source of water? The question remains unanswered and it’s an everyday struggle for all communities to exercise their right to satisfy this basic need.

The 6th UN Sustainable Development Goal aims to provide access to safe water and sanitation and sound management of freshwater ecosystems for all by 2030. Both are essential to human health, as well as to environmental sustainability and economic prosperity.

The UNDP reports that over 90 per cent of the world’s population uses improved drinking water sources and over two-thirds use improved sanitation facilities. Yet, most rural areas in underdeveloped countries have to cope with the lack of both, and the resulting bad health consequences. «Achieving universal access to basic sanitation and ending the unsafe practice of open defecation will require substantial acceleration of progress», says the report published in 2017.

A fourth of global population lives in countries with water stress, meaning they are vulnerable to future water scarcity by not having enough renewable sources. Countries in Northern Africa and Western Asia already face severe water stress. This is a matter of public policy; however, the participation of other actors, including organizations and local communities, is key to effective water and sanitation management.

WESDE trains health agents to act within communities

Within our Horyou community, the organization WESDE – Water, Energy and Sanitation for Development is very active in providing integrated water resources management, sanitation and health education in Cameroon. WESDE acts in both rural and urban areas, supporting the most vulnerable populations with information and resources for development.

Another member of the Horyou platform, EAA Burundi, created in 1988, is active in more than 35 African countries, as well as in Israel. It helps supply drinking water, using innovative solutions like dry latrines and simplified sewer networks, while supporting the communities through agricultural, financial and development projects.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote water and sanitation in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

O Brasil é o campeão mundial de violência contra as pessoas transgênero – além da gravidade das ameaças físicas, há outro tipo de violência menos visível. O preconceito contra essa parcela da população leva à marginalização e à falta de oportunidades de trabalho, estudo e integração à sociedade. Pensando nesse cenário, a empresa de bebidas Pernod Ricard Brasil fez uma parceria com as ONGs Transemprego e a Casal para lançar uma iniciativa de transformação e inclusão: um programa que oferece cursos profissionalizantes gratuitos na área de coquetelaria, já que essas pessoas encontram mais abertura no ambiente de bares e casas noturnas. Cinco turmas já foram organizadas e os participantes já vêm usando modernas técnicas nacionais e internacionais para preparação de coqueteis e atendimento ao público. No final, todas ganham um certificado da Drink Design, que é uma das empresas mais renomadas do Brasil nesse quesito. Entrevistamos Luana Iurillo, porta-voz da Pernod Ricard Brasil, sobre essa iniciativa de inclusão e profissionalização.

Alun@s do curso de profissionalização em coquetelaria

Quando e por que a Pernod Ricard decidiu lançar o projeto de formação do público transgênero?

O treinamento de bartenders para o público transgênero faz parte de uma campanha chamada Absolut Art Resistance. Essa campanha possui foco no público LGBTQ+, especialmente nos Transgêneros. Por isso, firmamos parceria com artistas renomadas como Mc Linn da Quebrada e As Bahias e a Cozinha Mineira, que permeiam este universo. Por outro lado, não temos como pensar em Transgêneros sem levar em consideração que essa parte da população ainda é muito vulnerável na sociedade por causa do preconceito e, por isso, enfrenta mais obstáculos do que o normal para ingressar no mercado de trabalho. A partir disso, pensamos em oferecer o curso de bartender e barback para gerar conhecimento a esses participantes para que eles possam ter qualificação para trabalharem em eventos e festas.

Já existia algo parecido no exterior ou foi uma iniciativa 100% local?

Absolut apoia a arte e a criatividade como motores do progresso no mundo todo desde a década de 70. Porém, por mais que a campanha Art Resistance retrate o posicionamento global da marca, este é um projeto idealizado pela Pernod Ricard Brasil. Estamos sempre apoiando produções do universo artístico e LGBTQ+. Um exemplo claro de que isso está no nosso DNA é que, recentemente, aqui no Brasil, Absolut foi uma das primeiras empresas a se posicionar publicamente em sua fanpage sobre a polêmica da “cura gay”. Além disso, no passado, a marca já firmou parceria com grandes nomes da arte, como Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, Joyce Tenneson, Ross Bleckner e entre outros.

Qual o potencial a empresa vê nesses alunos?

Os participantes estão enxergando nesse curso uma oportunidade de profissionalização. Tornar-se um bartender profissional exige muita disciplina e técnica. Todos eles conseguiram assimilar isso já no primeiro dia. Eles estão bastante animados e recebemos um retorno que ficaram muito felizes com essa chance que estão tendo. Para nós, é gratificante poder participar ativamente dessa formação e acompanhar de perto a evolução de cada um deles. Esperamos que eles sejam os primeiros a gerar uma consciência para o mundo sobre a grande oportunidade que existe de profissionalizar pessoas com um grau de energia e força de vontade para fazer a diferença. E que tudo isso não tem a ver com identidade de gênero ou orientação sexual.

Vale ressaltar ainda, que, este ano, Absolut promoverá uma festa como parte das ativações da campanha Art Resistance. Nesse evento nós vamos convidar os melhores alunos do curso para já atuarem profissionalmente, colocando em prática todo o aprendizado que foi adquirido. Além disso, vamos indicá-los para toda nossa rede de fornecedores que atuam nesse universo de festas, bares e mixologia. Uma ótima notícia é que até os sócios da Drink Design já sinalizaram interesse em chamar alguns alunos para fazerem parte do staff da empresa.

Horyou apoia as iniciativas de inovação social que ajudam o mundo a alcançar os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, e é organizadora do SIGEF, o Fórum de Inovação Social e Ética Global. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

A filosofia de trabalho da ONG Frutos do Amanhã é a solidariedade humana. Com atuação em comunidades em vulnerabilidade social, a organização usa a cultura, educação, respeito e cidadania para modificar as vidas de crianças e famílias em situação de risco. Membro ativo da nossa comunidade Horyou, a fundadora da ONG Heloisa Morais falou com o nosso blog sobre suas iniciativas e planos para o futuro.

Atividade promovida pela ONG Frutos do Amanhã

Quais são as principais inspirações para o trabalho da organização?

Temos um lema que vem inspirando e servindo de mantra para que possamos seguir em frente: Educação, Respeito e Disciplina.

Quais foram os projetos mais bem-sucedidos de 2017?

Executamos vários projetos como oficina de idiomas, capacitação escolar, danças culturais, capoeira, oficinas e ballet. Posso destacar dois como os mais bem-sucedidos, que foram as oficinas de Artesanato e Geração de Renda e o Ballet Sonho de Menina.

Ballet Sonho de Menina

Quais são os principais projetos da ONG Frutos do Amanhã para 2018?

Queremos ampliar nosso projeto educativo, melhorar e ampliar nosso espaço físico e buscar apoio para poder atender a famílias que se encontram na fila de espera para participar de nossas atividades.

Que tipo de impacto a organização deseja causar para o mundo?

Transformar crianças que vivem em situação de risco em cidadãos através da educação e cultura.

Oficina realizada pela ONG

Qual a importância de participar de uma rede social do bem social como a Horyou?

Fomos convidados em 2015 pela Horyou, que nos esclareceu sobre o funcionamento da rede, e desde então estamos ativos na plataforma buscando apoio para os projetos.

Vivemos em uma era de constante transformação. Quais são as mudanças positivas que você deseja para a sua comunidade e para as gerações futuras?

Estamos em uma região carente como muitas espalhadas pelo mundo, se com nossas ações conseguirmos livrar algumas crianças do tráfico de drogas, que hoje está sendo o primeiro emprego de crianças e adolescentes, será uma grande vitória.

The 4th UN Sustainable Development Goal relates to education and change. How to implement inclusive and quality education for all, and promote lifelong learning, to build a fairer society.

Children in Pakistani School. Photo: UNDP

Malala Yousafzai was only 12 years old when she wrote a moving blog article about her life in Pakistan under the Taliban regime. Her bravery almost cost Malala her life – she was shot by a gunman and had to flee her country to remain safe. Things have changed for her since. Her voice was now heard and she became famous in global media for advocating education for girls in her country. Last summer, Malala received the news that she was accepted at the prestigious Oxford University. She’s a good example that education can change people, build dreams, move the world.

Like Malala in her early years, many children have poor or no access to education. According to the UN, 57 million children are out of school. Half of them live in conflict-affected areas. Even when they do go to school, it is often not enough to provide them with the basic education: 103 million youth lack basic literacy skills, and more than 60 percent of them are women. The most vulnerable groups are persons with disabilities, indigenous people, refugee children and poor children in rural areas.

Some progress has been achieved in the last 17 years – more schools have access to computers, and schooling is growing; yet the numbers are unequal and can’t always equate with quality. «Even though more children than ever are going to school, many do not acquire basic skills in reading and mathematics», said a recent assessment report published by the UN. Teachers do not have proper training and the poor conditions of schools in many parts of the world jeopardize quality education prospects.

Funds for infrastructure and training are needed, as well as public policies that prioritize quality education. Many non-government organizations have acted tirelessly to improve the situation, especially in the most affected regions and with the most vulnerable groups.

Girls education is a critical issue for our society. Photo: Ma belle école

On the Horyou platform, the NGO Avante – Educação e Mobilização Social, based in Brazil, provides empowering education to children in poor and socially vulnerable communities. In addition to funding teacher training and tech inclusion in schools, it promotes citizenship, encourages gender and racial identity debates with children, their families and social actors and train them to become community leaders.

The association Ma Belle École works within school inclusion projects in developing countries. Through individual sponsorship programmes, it provides children with regular access to school in conflict-affected countries like Syria and Mali. It also helps their families, providing them with food and other basic resources, so children are not forced to abandon education and thus be used as cheap labor.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote education in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

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The UN Sustainable Development Goal number 7 aims to provide clean, affordable and reliable energy for all, to further inclusion, opportunity and empowerment. Almost 200...