Social Impact

The Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum organized by Horyou will discuss Future Energy, Smart Cities, SDGs, and lead official delegation to EXPO 2017 Astana

SIGEF 2017 will take place in Astana, Kazakhstan
SIGEF 2017 will take place in Astana, Kazakhstan

Horyou, the Social Network for Social Good, announces the 4th edition of SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum. The world-class event will take place on the 5th of September 2017, at Rixos President Astana Hotel in Astana, Kazakhstan. It will be followed by an official delegation’s visit to EXPO 2017 on the 6th and 7th of September.

With a team of top-class international speakers, panellists and moderators, SIGEF will cover three of the most critical issues of our time – Smart Cities, the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Future Energy. «With SIGEF, Horyou is committed to encourage multi-stakeholders to gather, interact, and establish partnerships to shape better times to come. SIGEF will bring together social entrepreneurs, impact investors, philanthropists, government officials and representatives from civil society, to spread the message that we can all be changemakers», says Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou.

Opening ceremony of SIGEF 2016 with Yonathan Parienti, Founder of Horyou, H.E Rosalie Matondo, Minister of Environment Republic of Congo, Dr. Ali Bin Samikh Al Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee (NHRC) in Qatar, HRH Prince Nawaf bin Saad al Saud, Chairman of the Al-Hilal Saudi football club and Yasuhiro Yamamoto, President of Eneco Holdings.
Opening ceremony of SIGEF 2016 with Yonathan Parienti, Founder of Horyou, H.E Rosalie Matondo, Minister of Environment Republic of Congo, Dr. Ali Bin Samikh Al Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee (NHRC) in Qatar, HRH Prince Nawaf bin Saad al Saud, Chairman of the Al-Hilal Saudi football club and Yasuhiro Yamamoto, President of Eneco Holdings.

Last year, SIGEF was the leading side event at the UN COP22, in Marrakesh, Morocco. The 3-day conference was attended by a 2500-wide international audience, while offering a space for non-profit organizations from all around the world, staging artistic acts, organizing an Horyou Foundation dinner, and presenting an award for social impact projects. It was the first SIGEF to be held out of Europe and in Africa.

This year, reinforcing its global presence and impact, Horyou is organizing the first SIGEF in Central Asia, with an agenda of discussions deeply anchored in the future of our interconnected societies. At the opening and end of the one-day SIGEF conference, the participants will have the opportunity to meet and greet some of the most important players in social entrepreneurship, as well as business leaders, funders and government officials, during a special networking session.

On the 6th and 7th of September, Horyou and the SIGEF team will lead an official visit to the country pavilions of EXPO 2017 Astana, the biggest future energy gathering this year. «We are thrilled to bring our SIGEF international delegations to connect with participants from all continents who are attending EXPO 2017 Astana, to build bridges of collaboration and foster sustainable solutions that will benefit our societies», says Parienti.

More information on www.sigef2017.com The agenda can be consulted here. Click to apply for speaking and to buy your ticket for SIGEF 2017.

About Horyou

Horyou is the social network for social good. Through technology, innovation and social entrepreneurship advocacy, it promotes meaningful and global interactions amongst its adherent organizations, members and personalities. With its platform, App and Spotlight, the first Global Social Currency for Impact, Horyou helps transform positive ideas into concrete actions while building constructive relationships both online and offline.

The Horyou App is available for free download via iOS and Android.

For more information visit www.horyou.com

From June 30 to July 2, European Youth Awards invite creative minds to join a game marathon at the Technical University of Graz, in Austria.

EYA Game Jam
EYA Game Jam

Why not use technology to discuss social and environmental changes? That’s the challenge presented by the European Youth Awards to the young, creative minds that will be part of EYA Game Jam. The programming competition takes place at the Technical University of Graz, in Austria, and will use tools like virtual reality and 360° to discuss topics like water and family.

The goal is to create game prototypes to address both topics, that are intrinsically connected to the Sustainable Development Goals. Says Kathrin Quatember, EYA spokesperson: “Two of the UN SDGs focus on the topic of water; Goal 6 – Clean water and sanitation and Goal 14 – Life below the sea. By establishing a special category, EYA wants to contribute to the international awareness of treating the “source of life“. Secondly, we try to motivate young innovators and entrepreneurs to develop smart solutions for water related problems and apply for European Youth Awards 2017”. Water should also be the topics of the EYA 2017, she added.

The idea of using virtual reality and tech gadgets in the event stems from the fact that EYA wanted to bring digital technologies to the center of social innovation discussions within the EYA community. “The combination of the Game Jam topics ‘water’ and ‘family’ with VR and 360° technology is thrilling. It enriches the possibilities for the Game Jammers to reach the peak of creativity and opens new possibilities to approach the topics”, said Kathrin.

The competition is open to everyone interested in game and development. EYA partnered with VRCORE, the organizer of the “Global VR Hackathon“ – a worldwide event with regional competitions and a Championship Final in Shanghai at the end of August. Three Winners of the Jam will be invited to the Championship Final – a unique opportunity for the participants to expand their network and learn!

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

On the 20th of June, the World Refugee Day, we remember the most vulnerable group of refugees worldwide: girls and women whose basic humanitarian rights are denied. Alongside the UN motto for the Sustainable Development Goals which is to «leave no one behind», the Horyou blog stands for women empowerment and protection.

Woman in refugee camp in Democratic Republic of Congo
Woman in refugee camp in Democratic Republic of Congo

We live in a world with unprecedented numbers of refugees. The statistics of the UNHCR released this week show that, last year, the number of displaced people has reached a record 65,5 million, the vast majority living in challenging conditions in developing countries. More than a third of these refugees are women and girls in their childbearing years, being considered amongst the most vulnerable.

UN Women reminds us that women and girls face many humanitarian violations such as forced marriages and that, while many families believe they are protecting their girls through arranged husbands, many of them end up even more exposed to domestic violence and early pregnancies. Besides having their childhood shortened, they tend to drop out of school and to have their sexual and reproductive rights denied.

Woman prepares meals in a refugee camp in Cameroon
Woman prepares meals in a refugee camp in Cameroon

«On World Refugee Day, we acknowledge the unique vulnerabilities of women and girl refugees, and the need for us all to do better to serve them. We also celebrate their strength. From crisis to crisis, it is the resilience and persistence of women and girls that carries their families, their communities and their societies through hardship to durable solution», said UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka in a statement.

Phumzile stresses the strenght of women and girls who call tirelessly for effective services such as health and education, and who develop creative and efficient approaches to support livelihoods. «When in camps, they are rapid adopters of opportunities through new technologies, like education via mobile devices, or cash-for-work programmes that develop skills for a life outside the camp. They are the experts on safe sanitary facilities, female-friendly camp design and other aspects critical for reducing women’s risk of physical and sexual violence and increasing their capacity to live independent and fulfilled lives. We must listen to their insights and amplify them», added the UN Women Director.

Woman learns the French alphabet in a refugee camp in Cameroon
Woman learns the French alphabet in a refugee camp in Cameroon

The opportunities for these women lie in education programs, health care and open opportunities for small businesses, especially in camp areas which suffer from the lack of funds and international support. «The international community must recommit itself to placing women and girls equally with men and boys at the heart of humanitarian action for the world’s refugees. We, and they, cannot afford anything less», concluded Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Being a social entrepreneur requires more than good intentions and resilience. Like any company, social enterprises need planning, a solid business model and cooperative networks. Through initiatives like The Global Good Fund and its support, social entrepreneurs are empowered and have access to tools to develop their businesses and become global leaders, bringing positive changes to the world. Carrie Rich, GGF’s CEO spoke to Horyou Blog and announced that applications are open for the 2018 Fellowship.

Global Good Fund fellows
Global Good Fund fellows

What is the scope of The Global Good Fund’s work?

The Global Good Fund develops social entrepreneurs into impactful global leaders through its Fellowship Program. Each Fellow is paired with a c-suite executive who serves as mentor, and is provided proprietary leadership assessment resources, a network of peers, sector expertise, and targeted financial capital. The result is confident leaders who scale their social enterprises and deliver sustainable positive social impact. We believe growing leaders is the most effective strategy for solving complex social problems and achieving global good. The Global Good Fund is currently seeking social entrepreneurs for its 2018 Fellowship Program -Apply Now.

As a social entrepreneurship supporter and accelerator, what would you say are the biggest challenges to be a social entrepreneur?

The two responsibilities that I focus most on as a social entrepreneur are similar to how a traditional entrepreneur spends her time. I focus on our people internally and growing our revenue model. We are fortunate to have an incredible team of dedicated professionals who consistently go above and beyond to support each other while serving the social entrepreneurs we are privileged to support. That culture does not happen by accident, rather our people are a core component of The Global Good Fund that require attention and nurturing over the long haul. Second, we are committed to growing our earned income so that we are financially viable long term. It’s exciting to find mission aligned methods to sustain our organization in addition to philanthropy.

The Global Good Fund focus in leadership development
The Global Good Fund focus in leadership development

What are the main aspects of a social business you evaluate in order to give it support?

We focus on the leadership development of individuals as the vehicle for growing social businesses. We look for social entrepreneurs who are full-time committed to their work, have enough “ego-strength” to stand by their convictions, and enough humility to be coachable.

Are you committed to the Sustainable Development Goals or do you address some of the SDGs with your projects?

We are not explicit in our commitment to the SDGs. We are philosophically aligned in that several of the social entrepreneurs we support lead enterprises that address the SDGs by focusing on health, poverty alleviation, gender equality, education, energy and water sanitation.

Global Good Fund
Global Good Fund

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

Many of my peers (millennials) aim to work for companies that have strong social values. Others are creating their own businesses when employers don’t meet social enterprise standards. I imagine a rich future wherein social values permeate business culture as millennials assume leadership roles.

On its social platform, Horyou connects thousands of social entrepreneurs, philanthropists and organizations around the world. In your opinion, what’s the importance of social networks for social entrepreneurship and, particularly, for The Global Good Fund’s work?

The Global Good Fund brand and community is largely built on social networks. We thrive as an organization when we connect with partners around the globe who share our commitment to growing high potential young leaders who are using business for social good.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Six years ago, Lovern Gordon, a lady social entrepreneur, decided to give hope to many women victims of domestic abuse. Instigated by her own personal and family story, she set up Love Life Now Foundation in the US, an organization which, throughout the years, has helped collect thousands of dollars for shelters and raise awareness about domestic violence worldwide. In this interview for the Horyou blog, Lovern shares her thoughts on feminism and social media as an awareness tool, as well as her hopes for the future.

Lovern Gordon in a  Teen Domestic Violence Workshop
Lovern Gordon in a Teen Domestic Violence Workshop

Briefly, tell us a little about the beginning of Love Life Foundation and its main advances.

Love Life Now Foundation, Inc. was established in November, 2011.

I worked tirelessly to promote Awareness Against Domestic Violence as a platform after winning 2 beauty pageants (locally in Boston and nationally in Los Angeles in 2010), but did not want to stop there with advocacy, so Love Life Now was formed.

I am a survivor of abuse from a 2 year relationship, and was also a child witness to it…my mother was abused at the hands of our father throughout their marriage. My mother and I were unaware at the time of the tremendous and valuable resources available to victims and survivors that help save lives daily, and is the reason I seek to spread awareness on a daily basis today through the Foundation’s work.

Through the formation of the Love Life Now and its initiatives, we have been able to donate thousands of dollars to shelters statewide, raise awareness about resources available nationwide and assist victims and survivors in finding the necessary help as it relates to this issue.

Volunteers give brown bag lunches and toiletry filled care packages to homeless affected by domestic violence and beyond.
Volunteers give brown bag lunches and toiletry filled care packages to homeless affected by domestic violence and beyond.

What are the main inspirations for your work?

My mother. For all that she has endured, never letting it break her spirit and still coming out on top…she’s my hero.

What kind of impact does the organization want to make in the world?

When Love Life Now was formed, all I sought to do was help anyone that needed it. Over the years I have observed that our initiatives leave folks with a desire to do more as bystanders when it comes to this issue. If we can continue to help change the narrative while continuing to inspire, that will be more than I could have ever asked for.

Lovern Gordon
Lovern Gordon

Horyou is the social network for social good. How do social networks and technology influence the day-to-day running of the foundation?

I’d say it’s literally the bread and butter of Love Life Now. Our reach via social networks and technology has proven to be limitless. For instance, our newly launched digital domestic violence awareness magazine Love Life Magazine (www.lovelifemag.org), reaches folks in as far as Spain, Africa and the Caribbean. The same goes for our almost daily posts about what we’re doing to foster change…which in turn enables others to let them know they can do the same in their corner of the world.

Feminism is a movement that has gained momentum and has helped people to be aware openly about domestic violence. Do you see the change in women empowerment throughout the years?

Absolutely! Across the world, no matter where you lived…domestic violence was looked upon as a taboo subject, accepted by some cultures, or shameful all around. Though we still have a long, long way to go, I believe it’s no longer business as usual when it comes to women being abused. More women are standing in solidarity with those affected by it. One in every four women will be touched by this issue and in the age of social media where you can show support to other women who no longer want to be silent about it, the empowerment level has been raised up significantly.

White Ribbon Night Gala, where men are invited to speak out against domestic violence
White Ribbon Night Gala, where men are invited to speak out against domestic violence

We live in an age of constant transformation. What are the positive changes you want for women’s lives and for future generations?

A big hope is that the laws surrounding domestic violence and sexual assault are continuously tightened and enforced.

Horyouis the Social Network for Social Good, which connect, support and promote social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens that thrive helping the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

As the social entrepreneurship landscape gets more promising, it also becomes more challenging and complex – there are many different types of ventures and business models to develop, while many youngsters crave for help and guidance through this process. The Social Venturer Anika Horn has been working for years supporting young social entrepreneurs, through advisory, acceleration programs and community building. Anika gave this interview to our blog about the biggest challenges and trends for social entrepreneurship.

Anika Horn and a team of social entrepreneurs
Anika Horn and a team of social entrepreneurs

What is the scope of your work?

I work with purpose-driven entrepreneurs from inception to established businesses through one-on-one advisory, programming and community building. I spend a lot of time supporting mission-driven entrepreneurs in building up their companies, and curating the community around certified B Corps, social entrepreneurs and socially responsible companies.

What are the biggest challenges for social entrepreneurs?

At first sight, the challenges that social entrepreneurs face are not that different from the ones that “regular” entrepreneurs face: Defining your niche, validating the market, building a financially sustainable business model, pricing, finding investment, marketing on a startup budget, building the model to scale. It’s the commitment to a double or even triple-bottom line that adds nuance to each of these challenges. Pricing is not just a question of willingness but ability to pay, any cost structure is likely to reflect not only financial expenses but the social or environmental impacts.

A second challenge I foresee for social entrepreneurs is standing out from the noise. Unfortunately, I see a lot of self-declared social entrepreneurs who might have a good story but lack substance in terms of real business stamina, actual outputs and success metrics. These so called social entrepreneurs muddy the waters of what real social entrepreneurship can do and achieve, and make it harder for those who are serious about creating lasting change through business to be taken seriously.

Anika assesses and helps to build social enterprises and communities
Anika assesses and helps to build social enterprises and communities

Can you share some social enterprise success stories you have assessed?

One challenge in the world of social entrepreneurship is how success is defined. Is it creating market access for a marginalized community? Is it lifting three individuals out of poverty, or three thousand? In that sense, defining success becomes a challenge in and of itself. Two entrepreneurs I have been impressed with over the last year are Rupa Singh of Love this RVA, and Jeff Beck and Adam Dreyfus of Answers Now.

Love This RVA is a platform for socially responsible shopping and conscious consumerism. Rupa started out with a co-founder with whom she ended up parting ways, is now running the online and airstream shop by herself, has growing number of speaking engagements, and is figuring out her financial model. She might never scale nationally, but she is successful in making a deep impact in the mindsets of the community she lives and operates in.

Jeff and Adam are developing a mobile app to support parents of children with autism. As first-time founders, I met them when they had little more than the idea. It is unimaginable for an outsider how much time the backend tech development takes, how many sprints and delays and iterations they have gone through. Adam and Jeff are successful because they are designing their service through constant conversations with their target customers. I celebrate their learning process in the lean startup sense over any potential revenue they currently generate and I see great potential in their ability to scale and expand the application to other underserved communities.

Anika Horn
Anika Horn

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

I personally hope that we come to understand that social entrepreneurship is just that: entrepreneurship that leverages hard-to-crack opportunities in the market. With all the Ubers, Instagrams and nutrition bars in the world, real opportunities for disruption lie in areas of social and environmental injustice: lack of equal access to education and healthcare, large-scale upcycling of ocean plastic waste, reintegration of ex-convicts – these are the kinds of untapped opportunities that will impact millions of lives and therefore have a promising future. But they are nuts to crack.

Horyou is the social network for social good. How important are social networks for social entrepreneurs?

Launching and running a social enterprise can be a very isolating, frustrating, lonesome experience. Not every social entrepreneur qualifies as a Schwab or Ashoka Fellow. Social networks can provide accountability, connectedness and as trivial as it may sound: inspiration. Sometimes knowing that others are just as crazy trying to change the world around them is what it takes to get back on the horse. Besides, entrepreneurs have so much to learn from each other; why not use social networks to steepen that learning curve by creating a space for meaningful conversations and knowledge exchange?

What is your main lesson from working with social entrepreneurs?

Don’t be a heropreneur. I have met too many self-acclaimed social entrepreneurs who want to save the world in some way and would figure out what issue they were passionate about along the way. I understand that we as Millennials look for purpose in our careers but the answer isn’t always to become a social entrepreneur. In fact, most social entrepreneurs who are doing great work don’t refer themselves as such, and certainly didn’t start out by wanting to become one. While I commend everyone who knows they don’t want to work for the man but go change the world, there are a million and one ways – or at least five – to make a meaningful contribution that do not involve “become a social entrepreneur”.

I believe that real social entrepreneurs are in a position to redefine the impact of entrepreneurship by creating meaningful systemic change. Let’s not call everyone with good intentions a social entrepreneur and focus our resources on the founders who have the right intentions, the potential, and the tenacity to change the world.

Horyou is a supporter of social entrepreneurship and social ventures around the world

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