Psychology

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Horyou had the chance to interview Eleanor Watson, engineer, entrepreneur, futurist and believer in the positive future of humanity. Eleanor Watson grew up in Northern Ireland as an only child of an engineer, a childhood in which books taught her at an early age the challenges in this world and the hope in defeating them. Today, her continued interest in the psychology of technology has led her to study, speak about and encourage the emergence of social trends. Mrs. Watson is within the Artificial Intelligence & Robotics Faculty at the Singularity University, a benefit corporation that helps individuals, businesses institutions, investors, NGOs and governments with educational programs, training them to understand new technologies and the positive impact potential of these technologies. In this interview she tells us about her work and experiences at the University. — by Amma Aburam

Have you always wanted to be an advocate for Technology in Social Good and Impact? How did it come about?

I grew up as the only child of an engineer in a house filled with serious science fiction. From an early age I also had a cherished copy of the Gaia Atlas of Planet Management, a book that details the whole world’s resources, and the greatest problems of our world society.

I also learned that lasting humanitarian successes, such as the eradication of smallpox, seemed like science fiction not so long ago.

I believe that the combination of these two influences seeded an understanding of the immense challenges facing so many in this world, along with a sense of optimism in being able to continue our shaping our world for the better.

The University impacts Education, Innovation and Community, how are these three elements intertwined to tackle world challenges?

SU teaches new models for understanding the world, based upon principles of harnessing the power of exponential technology curves, and a cultivated mentality of abundance (as opposed to one of scarcity).

This leads to a whole new way of looking at the world, and people sometimes switch the whole track of their lives once they acquire these new tools for understanding the complex systems in which we live.

Such methods also create a clarity about predicting the future of technology and society, which leads SU alumni to found new ventures that are ahead of the curve that the solutions created may have no precedent, or no existing market for them. Many of these solutions are able to generate massive social impact, as well as building powerful engines of wealth creation, enriching society at least as much as shareholders.

Furthermore, we lead an extended community of alumni that is able to continue to collaborate all through their careers. I continue to work on a range of socially beneficial projects with colleagues that I first met during SU, creating a lasting legacy of creative benefit.

What are your best/favorite success stories of local impact with technology through the strategies at Singularity University?

SU students and alumni have founded a wide range of inspiring ventures, with missions as daring as detecting cancer at the earliest stages, mining old electronics to recover valuable materials (mined originally often in places of intense conflict), or even drones that can replenish entire forests by firing seedlings like a machine gun.

What in your opinion are the three building blocks in reaching solutions for local community issues?

The most important success factor is having in-depth understanding of the situation within the local areas that the issue has the strongest particular impact.

Very often, NGOs and public officials attempt to intervene in a situation with the best of intentions, spend a lot of time and money, and still not fix the problem, because they did not spend enough time ‘on the ground’ asking local people about the real issues, and how they themselves suggest fixing them.

Worse still, sometimes even seemingly beneficial actions can lead to unintended consequences for other parties, or for the wider environment. No lasting and useful social solution can ever arise without an intense learning and deep understanding of the core problems, as experienced by people affected by them.

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 to 10 years? Any ideals?

I’m not sure if there is a universal ‘meaning of life’, but we can certainly choose one for ourselves. I have chosen one overriding personal goal in my life, and that is to seed as much good in the world as I reasonably can. I even keep a mental score counter of my hit rate.

There are many possible means of amplifying the good that one does:

One may launch new ventures, creating a self-sustaining engine of happiness for the world. One may educate and inspire others where knowledge is most crucial, and most lacking. One may discover complementary qualities between people that can cause them to flourish once connected. Sometimes one may simply pinpoint better places to allocate resources using reason and evidence, the core idea behind the Effective Altruism movement.

What does our mantra Dream, Act and Inspire mean to you personally and professionally?

An inquisitive spirit to dream of a better future, a valiant will to take action towards those ends, and the inspiration to continue against daunting odds, because humanity needs you to succeed. These are the ingredients of all world-changing efforts!

Written by Dearbhla Gavin

On March 20, 2015, UNICEF hosted World Happiness Day at The Lord Mayor’s house. In recent months, UNICEF has been vocal about how important happiness and wellbeing is to and that it is ultimately a human right. There were many distinguished speakers at the event who discussed their pursuit and achievement of happiness in their lives.

“Happiness is a pursuit and a process, not a destination,” performance psychologist Gerry Hussey said. Much like choosing to live a healthier life, it means taking control and steadily making different choices.

Many agree that happiness is a difficult variable to measure; everyone has their own opinions on what it means. It cannot be defined collectively; only individuals can make the commitment to achieving it on their own.

Broadcaster, publisher and creator of the Spark Series, Norah Casey, reaffirmed the “importance of you.” She spoke of how in a world of constant connection, we can still struggle to get ahead. This constant connection doesn’t necessarily translate to productivity. Casey explains that our energy—physical, emotional, mental, are all connected, so it is only when we tap into all three that we will be able to focus and by extension, achieve.

Casey also discussed how crucial it is to businesses to have a “can do” attitude and after 20 years as the owner of Ireland’s largest magazine publisher, Harmonia, she has some authority on the matter!

Dr. Mark Rowe, GP and wellbeing coach, highlighted years of medical research proving that happiness is something that is actually cultivated. There is overwhelming evidence that incorporating a few small habits can give you a more positive outlook. Expressing gratitude, kindness, exercising, nurturing relationships, being present, are all small gestures that can be practiced everyday in pursuit of happiness.

Over the course of the morning, it was fascinating to see the content spread from psychology to medicine to business.

Everyone left incredibly energized, positive and definitely more informed on what can be done to achieve the emotional, mental and physical stability we all long for.

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