NGOs

The 5th Sustainable Development Goal concerns nearly half of global population – girls and women are still far from having the same opportunities and privileges as men

Photo: UNDP

Internet and social media are full of hashtags concerning women’s challenges in our society. The most recent one was #metoo, in which women shared their personal stories about harassment. The idea was to prove a grim reality – believe me if you are a man, almost every female on the planet has a sad story to tell about it. If you are a woman, you already know how it feels.

From corporations in the developed world to slums in the poorest countries, we share the same vulnerability. Since we’re born, our gender defines our challenges – we are going to face more difficulties to access education; if we get into the job market, our salaries will be lower; we are more exposed to violence and forced marriages; we have poorer access to health services. Women empowerment is urgent, and we, regardless of gender, should work together to promote it.

We need more representation: according to the UNDP, in 46 countries, women hold 30% or more in national parliament seats. Globally, women’s participation in single or lower houses of national parliaments reached 23.4 percent in 2017, just 10 percentage points higher than in 2000. It’s not enough.

We need more education: in sub-Saharan Africa, Oceania and Western Asia, girls still face barriers to entering both primary and secondary school.

We need equal opportunities: in the corporate world, women are underrepresented in managerial positions. In the majority of the 67 countries with data from 2009 to 2015, fewer than a third of senior- and middle-management positions were held by women.

We need liberty: only half of women in reproductive age make their own decisions about consensual sexual relations and use of contraceptives and health services.

We deserve respect: A fifth of women of reproductive age have suffered physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to the survey, made in 2016.

Association El Khir promotes cooking workshops for women in Morocco

The SDG 5 defends the end of all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. In 2014, the UN Women launched the campaign He for She, inviting men to join the fight for equal opportunities – since then, the discussion has improved and many debate spaces were opened in media, companies, governments and civil society. Many organizations have been working towards the same goal. The Horyou community has great examples of NGOs and projects that support women and create an empowering environment for them to overcome difficulties and thrive personally and professionally.

One of the active members of our platform is Association Féminine de Bienfaisance El-Khir, based in Morocco, which promotes better life condition for women in the country, supporting their independence by providing them with legal assistance and career opportunities through education.

One of the activities of Fundação Laço Rosa during Pink October

In Brazil, Fundação Laço Rosa, yet another active nonprofit organization in our platform, empowers women with breast cancer, by helping them with self-image issues and to create bonds to overcome the disease.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote women empowerment in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

Written by Vivian Soares

The 4th UN Sustainable Development Goal relates to education and change. How to implement inclusive and quality education for all, and promote lifelong learning, to build a fairer society.

Children in Pakistani School. Photo: UNDP

Malala Yousafzai was only 12 years old when she wrote a moving blog article about her life in Pakistan under the Taliban regime. Her bravery almost cost Malala her life – she was shot by a gunman and had to flee her country to remain safe. Things have changed for her since. Her voice was now heard and she became famous in global media for advocating education for girls in her country. Last summer, Malala received the news that she was accepted at the prestigious Oxford University. She’s a good example that education can change people, build dreams, move the world.

Like Malala in her early years, many children have poor or no access to education. According to the UN, 57 million children are out of school. Half of them live in conflict-affected areas. Even when they do go to school, it is often not enough to provide them with the basic education: 103 million youth lack basic literacy skills, and more than 60 percent of them are women. The most vulnerable groups are persons with disabilities, indigenous people, refugee children and poor children in rural areas.

Some progress has been achieved in the last 17 years – more schools have access to computers, and schooling is growing; yet the numbers are unequal and can’t always equate with quality. «Even though more children than ever are going to school, many do not acquire basic skills in reading and mathematics», said a recent assessment report published by the UN. Teachers do not have proper training and the poor conditions of schools in many parts of the world jeopardize quality education prospects.

Funds for infrastructure and training are needed, as well as public policies that prioritize quality education. Many non-government organizations have acted tirelessly to improve the situation, especially in the most affected regions and with the most vulnerable groups.

Girls education is a critical issue for our society. Photo: Ma belle école

On the Horyou platform, the NGO Avante – Educação e Mobilização Social, based in Brazil, provides empowering education to children in poor and socially vulnerable communities. In addition to funding teacher training and tech inclusion in schools, it promotes citizenship, encourages gender and racial identity debates with children, their families and social actors and train them to become community leaders.

The association Ma Belle École works within school inclusion projects in developing countries. Through individual sponsorship programmes, it provides children with regular access to school in conflict-affected countries like Syria and Mali. It also helps their families, providing them with food and other basic resources, so children are not forced to abandon education and thus be used as cheap labor.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote education in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

Every baby taking its first breath is a potential actor of change. Every teenager living in a healthy environment has the potential to create a stable and happy family. Every woman with access to a safe childbirth is potentially a loving mother. Health is an essential condition to change the world for the better.

Photo: UNDP

What would the world be like when deaths are not caused by neglected or badly treated diseases anymore? The UN Sustainable Development Goal number 3 aims to ensure healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages.

It does not mean that we would no more have diseases and deaths, but that we would minimize avoidable mistakes and negligence. Global maternity mortality ratio, for instance, would be reduced to less than 70 per 100,000 and epidemics of infectious diseases would end by 2030. Road accidents, tobacco-related illnesses and other health conditions caused by lack of access to treatment would not be part of our daily lives either.

According to the UN, many advances have been made on the health front worldwide since 2000. Yet we still have to face realities such as the ones we find in sub-Saharan regions whereby only 53% live births are assisted by skilled people and mortality among children under 5 years of age is 84‰, almost twice global rates. Part of the solution is to prevent early and unintended pregnancies by fighting child marriages and spreading reproductive education; but there is an urgent need to invest and train in skilled care and sound health policies worldwide.

Infectious diseases are yet another challenge to face – HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis B epidemics continue to plague many countries -, and the solution lies in prevention. Vaccines, sanitation and hygiene, as well as sexual education are to be improved. The same applies to premature deaths caused by depression, alcohol and tobacco, all of which are taboo ailments in several regions.

Many of these health risks are directly related to poor quality medical assistance and lack of health coverage and funding, especially in underdeveloped regions. Available data from 2005 to 2015 indicate that over 40% countries count less than one physician per 1,000 people, and around half have fewer than three nurses or midwives per 1,000 people. Almost all least developed countries count less than one physician and fewer than three nurses or midwives per 1,000 people.

Many organizations and social projects did produce some improvement. Child Family Health International, an NGO that is active on our Horyou platform, is one fine example of community-based global health education programs for students and institutions that aim at empowering local communities. CFHI acts on undergraduate medical schools curricula and publishes papers and publications on global health safety on a regular basis.

Based in Cameroon, Ascovime, yet another active member of the Horyou community, runs educational health campaigns and provides free medical consultation and surgery to isolated communities throughout the country. Ascovime was founded by Dr. Georges Bwelle, a surgeon at the Central Hospital in Yaoundé and a CNN Hero.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote health and well-being in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

Step 1 – End Poverty in All its Forms, Everywhere Horyou’s new series is about the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Every week, Horyou blog will publish an article about one of them, highlighting projects and actions that have been supporting its implementation.

Women in East Timor counts with NGO help. Females are one of the groups most affected by poverty. Source UNDP.
Women in East Timor counts with NGO help. Females are one of the groups most affected by poverty. Source UNDP.

Valeria is a Peruvian woman who struggles to support her family. A single mom with 2 small children and a sick parent who lives with her, she works as a waitress in a restaurant during the day and in a bar at night. She only has 4 hours sleep every night, yet her income is only enough to pay the rent of her room and some basic expenses. «Luckily, I can bring home some food from the restaurant and I can feed my daughters. But I can’t buy them clothes or books», she says.

Like Valeria, about 10% of the world’s workers and their families live with less than $1,90 per person per day. According to the UN, the rate has declined steadily in the past 17 years, though an estimated 767 million people still live below the poverty line. About one third is unprotected by their national and regional social systems.

Interactions and Solidarity project in Kenya
Interactions and Solidarity project in Kenya

When the UN Sustainable Development Goals were launched in January 2016, following the 15-year Millenium Development Goals, poverty was still one of the worst concerns in the developing and poor regions. For decades, institutions, NGOs and social entrepreneurs have developed support programs to take the poorer ones out of their condition and offer them perspective and hope.

Within the Horyou community and on its platform, NGOs like InterActions-Solidarity focus on poverty reduction and environment projects in Kenya. Based on the demands of each community, they provide support in the implementation of solidarity and socio-economic, eco-tourism and food safety programs. «We’ve seen an increase of productivity and profitability of farming and grazing activities respecting the environment, and with the sustainable management of natural resources», says the NGO spokesperson.

SER Sustentável works with homeless people from Brazil
SER Sustentável works with homeless people from Brazil

Other organizations like SER Sustentável, based in Brazil, help homeless people with addiction to alcohol or crack cocaine to step up and reintegrate life with dignity. The organizations also acts in poor communities providing them with sustainable housing and training support. «We want to reintegrate them in the society through work and income, offering workshops that would help them to find jobs», says Silvana Grandi, SER Sustentável president.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps fight poverty in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to impact the Cause of poverty or any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum
Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum

It´s time to innovate! Horyou, the social network for social good, is receiving project applications for the next edition of the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum (SIGEF), a side event during COP 22 in Marrakesh, Morocco, from November 9-11. The call for the Project Awards is addressed to students, social entrepreneurs, nonprofit organizations and startups with a deadline set at September 20th.

Applicants must meet the eligibility criteria, which include addressing at least one of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, and use their best efforts to raise awareness and gain online support for their project. They also need to sign in on the Horyou Platform; registration is free of charge.

SIGEF Horyou

During the SIGEF, an international jury will select 10 finalists who will present their projects on stage to a global audience of entrepreneurs, government officials and decision-makers, as well as the media and civil society. A monetary prize paid in Spotlights, the first social global currency for economic inclusion, will be awarded to the 3 best projects, during a high profile international award ceremony. Selected participants will get free access to the event to gain international visibility and the opportunity to expand their network.

For more information about the SIGEF 2016 Call for Projects, go to this link or send an email to projects@sigef2016.com

About SIGEF

SIGEF 2016 is the leading side event during COP 22, in Marrakesh, Morocco, from 9-11 November. SIGEF 2016 is organized by Horyou to give visibility to initiatives that contribute to advancing social innovation, global ethics, and social good worldwide, along the lines of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. One of the key components of SIGEF 2016 is the Projects Hub, an area dedicated to socially innovative and ethical projects.

Plenary sessions, workshops, panels as well as cultural activities, networking events and interviews will take place during the 3 days of the event.

cover sigef
The Horyou community embraces more than 1,000 organisations and 220,000 users from more than 180 countries.

Most organizations involved in social good and humanitarian projects have experienced the challenge of finding capital to promote impactful actions within their communities. In this area, like in many others, we see money flowing from big companies and foundations to big NGOs and associations – and they are surely doing a good job – but we also see small and medium sized organizations who are tireless in their efforts to make a difference in the world through their humanitarian projects with lesser support and funding.

This unevenness has been of major concern to Horyou since its inception, when it begun building its social network for social good.

Horyou has since grown to embrace 180 countries with a community of 1,000 organizations and 220,000 users around the world, becoming an expression of the diversity of civil society at a global level. Horyou now has enough experience and means to take its mission to the next level by creating Spotlight, the First Global Social Currency.

sigef 2
Engaged and active organisations on Horyou platform will increase their chances to receive Spotlights from Horyou proprietary algorithm.

In a world where social disparities are widening due to speculation and greed, technology is a powerful tool of citizen empowerment. Spotlight intends to bring inclusiveness to the ones who are bringing positive change to the world by reconciling capital and social media. Our goal is to connect great companies and people who want to leave a legacy to the world through positive actions with associations who are, in real life, doing good.

With the Global Social Currency, the first of its kind, Horyou’s goal is to connect innovative and CSR corporations with people and organizations who make great efforts to leave a positive legacy to the world through their involvement in social good.

In the past few years, we have seen a significant development of the concept of crowdfunding, whereby single contributions, however small, are important to the edifice under construction. Horyou’s aim is to go even further in the process of inclusive access to capital.

By connecting its members with committed organizations on its social network platform, Horyou seeks to broaden funding opportunities for social good.

Spotlight will be funded by Horyou’s individual members as well as by its partners: firms, corporate foundations, institutions and innovative start ups. Each Horyou member can provide and/or get support from any other member in the form of one or more Spotlights. The platform will include a proprietary algorithm that is set to redistribute a significant share of the capital received from Horyou’s partners to the most active users and organizations.

Associations and social actors can – and should – use the Horyou community at their own benefit, by communicating their projects and actions and sharing each other’s causes. Social media engagement and activity are keys to receive Spotlights from Horyou’s community members and algorithm.

Connect for good with Spotlight!

Contributions from the Horyou Team. Compiled by Vivian Soares.

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