NGO

A new member of Horyou platform, the Haiti Cholera Research Funding Foundation (HCRFF) invests in education and awareness to prevent health issues in developing countries

Pierrette Cazeau

Despite being born in Haiti, Pierrette Cazeau grew up in New York and Florida, in the US, and thus was never aware of the country’s challenges until she first visited it as a grown up-woman. She was struck by the challenges faced by its population on a daily basis – lack of health infrastructure, corruption, abuse, poverty and hunger. That changed her life as she decided to devote her time and efforts to build a Foundation and use education to prevent such disasters as the 2010 cholera outbreak.

«You can’t predict natural disasters or climate change effects, but you can educate people to prevent and reduce poverty. Without education, you just open the door to the negative effects of the unpredictable», says Pierrette, founder of HCRFF. The NGO was created in 2013 and has since developed many projects to support and empower communities facing health and social problems. «We’ve seen so many victimized people sitting quietly, and that escalates anger and hate». Economic and social problems, she believes, are part of a cycle that comprises disruption, refugee crisis and racism.

Syphilis Project

Focusing on education, the foundation organizes workshops for students coming from challenging backgrounds. In addition to preparing them for work via professional education, and providing them with food, HCRFF also raises awareness of topics like HIV prevention (PrEP and PEP), sexual abuse and other sensitive topics that are critical for the new generations. The NGO also helps Haitians to get access to health care in the US by providing them with transportation, shelter, advocacy and even translation services whenever needed. It also supports pregnant Haitian women left behind by UN peacekeeping soldiers.

The next step is to expand the Foundation services to other countries including Ghana, in Africa, where it intends to start an education campaign on HIV and other STDs. «We need more sponsors as we never charge anything for the services we provide to the communities», says Pierrette. For the last three years, the NGO has been funded by partners, but new sources of financial support are needed. One of the plans is to organize a Marathon for People Living with HIV and raise funds for the cause of education for prevention. «One thing I’ve learned from my father is that education can’t be taken from you. It stays with you forever. I’m grateful for all the educational opportunities I’ve had and I wish more people keep benefitting from it as well».

Le rêve de ne plus voir de mineurs incarcérés dans les prisons camerounaises a été le moteur de création de l’Association d’assistance à l’integration des enfants défavorisés (AAIED). Nouvelle et très active organisation sur notre plateforme, AAIED travaille sur des projets de sensibilisation et d’éducation des jeunes dans l’éspoir de leur construire un meilleur avenir. Horyou Blog a interviewé Gaëlle Caline, la fondatrice d’AAIED.

Discussion éducative avec les mineurs incarcérés sur les dangers de la drogue la mauvaise compagnie et le vol

Qu’est-ce qui vous a inspirée à créer votre organisation ?

Ayant grandit dans une ville au Cameroun, j’ai été toujours entourée d’enfants vivant dans la rue, des sans abris; et la grande majorité se nourrissait chez moi. Nous étions comme une famille ! Quand ils se faisaient arrêter, j’allais leur rendre visite dans le centre pénitencier avec de la nourriture. J’ai donc découvert ce milieu en 2008. J’ai longtemps longtemps travaillé dans les orphelinats, mais je prends plus plaisir à travailler dans le milieux carcéral parce qu’il y a plein de choses à faire dans les prisons de mon pays.

Eclairez-nous sur la situation des mineurs incarcerés dans votre pays et parlez-nous des projets que vous développez.

Au Cameroun, il n’y pas de département séparé pour les mineurs. La plupart des mineurs sont incarcérés à cause de leurs addiction à la drogue. Actuellement, nous travaillons à la prison de Foumban et à la prison de Douala. À Foumban, nous avons eu à traiter un certain nombre de problèmes comme l’alphabétisation. Les mineurs de cette prison ne savent ni lire ni écrire et ne font rien de leur journée. Notre objectif dans cette prison c’est de créer une école. Quant à la prison de Douala, elle est la plus vaste de la région. Notre rôle c’est d’assister juridiquement les mineurs et les informer des procédures légales. Notre expérience montre que beaucoup de mineurs sont carrément oubliés dans nos prisons. A leur sortie, nous avons deux options : les intégrer dans leurs familles respectives ou les placer dans une institution. À cause de leur addiction, mon but c’est de combattre ce fléau en invitant les jeunes de certains établissements à assister à des séminaires que j’organise dans les prisons pour qu’ils voient de leurs yeux les dégâts de la drogue.

Projet Arbre de Noel

Quels sont vos défis principaux en 2018 ?

Il y en a plusieurs, comme la création de l’école dans la prison centrale de Foumban et l’instauration d’une caravane dans toutes les prisons en invitant les jeunes des établissements scolaires à une discussion éducative donc le thème est l’impact de la drogue, de la mauvaise compagnie et du vol sur les adolescents. Nous avons aussi l’objectif de créer un cours de droit des enfants sur un trimestre. Enfin, comme tous les ans, il y a le défi de faire un arbre de Noël pour les jeunes.

Vous êtes une nouvelle organisation dans notre communauté Horyou. Partagez votre espoir et vous plans pour notre plateforme !

J’ai besoin d’une grande visibilité sur la plateforme. Cela fait 7 ans que nous existons sans partenaires, sans sponsors, sans visibilité. J’attends beaucoup de la plateforme Horyou ! Notre combat, nous le menons avec amour et passion !

Cancer is still a taboo in many parts of the world. Especially in Asia, where there is an urgent need to raise awareness of the disease and to support people cannot afford to get the right treatment. For 10 years now, EMPOWERED – The Cancer Advocacy Society of Malaysia, has acted on these critical issues, helping and enlightening communities who are suffering from the lack of information and hope. In this interview with Wallance Cheong, project executive at EMPOWERED, a new member of our Horyou platform, shares the values and missions of this organization with our community.

Empowered team during Colorectal Cancer Awareness, Screening & Treatment Project

When was Empowered founded?

EMPOWERED was officially registered with the Registrar of Societies Malaysia in 2008 and is governed by an Executive Committee Board consisting of elected volunteers. It was founded by Dr. Christina Ng, a Consultant Medical Oncologist and our program started from year 2009 onwards. The organization is an ally of the poor who are afflicted with cancer.  EMPOWERED is committed to helping them to cope with cancer and life through the society’s many structured and personalized programs, and we bring these programs right into their homes. Our mission is to save lives, to prevent cancer and eliminate suffering amongst the poor.

Empowered’s Milestones

Your organization raises awareness of a condition that is considered taboo by many. How do you set the tone to discuss it with the general public?

The cancer awareness level, particularly in Asia, remains a challenge and some may perceive cancer as a taboo to be discussed. All the myths and misunderstandings about cancer are generally due to the lack of the right education and knowledge. Thus, we constantly raise public awareness and advocacy through our tailored campaigns and projects, educational exhibitions and talks, workshops etc. Furthermore, in accordance with society’s vision and mission, we actually bring these programs and supports right into the underprivileged communities home. We enable our EMPOWERED professionals to touch the hearts of the public.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness, Screening & Treatment Project

Do you have any plans and projects for 2018 that you would like to share?

We will carry out our annual signature campaign – Colorectal Cancer Awareness, Screening and Treatment Project (CCASTP) 2018. However, unlike previous practice, we would like to heighten public awareness level of cancer issues by organizing a Charity Run. The run is planned to be carried out in November, in conjunction with EMPOWERED’s 10th Anniversary and the Lung Cancer Month, and we are expecting about 2,000 people to join us.

You are a new organization in our Community. Tell us about your expectations and projects for Horyou.

We understand Horyou is an esteemed, established platform and action-oriented social network for the social good; EMPOWERED is honoured to join as a member of this big family. As time goes by, we expect to reach a wider public, raise public awareness and advocacy of cancer and generate funding and support for the sustainability of EMPOWERED’s projects with the aid of Horyou. 

SDG#6 is an inspiration for Water Energy and Sanitation for Development (WESDE), an active member of our Horyou community. With the aim to fill the gap left by civil society organizations in terms of Health and Environment Education and Integrated Water Resources Management in Cameroon, WESDE faces security, infrastructure and funding challenges to bring development to urban and rural populations in the far North region of the country. Interview with Marie Louise Kongne, WESDE National Coordinator.

WESDE team acting in Cameroon

What are WESDE’s main goals?

While improving significantly the sanitation, hygiene and housing conditions of disadvantaged populations, we aim to reduce the percentage of the population that does not have sustainable access to a drinking water supply. We also want to train and educate people to sustainable management of water resources and the protection of the environment, trying to reverse the current trend of loss of environmental resources. In order to do so, we seek to cooperate with national and international organizations, develop and maintain partnership, exchange and learning relationships. Last but not least, one of our objectives is to accompany the community in the fight against HIV / AIDS in order to stop its spread and reverse the current trend.

Tell us about your main achievements in 2017 and your plans for 2018

In 2017, we helped to raise awareness on education and training of 125 community health workers to work closely with families in 9 health areas on 12 main themes. In total, more than 43,000 households were visited. We also had an active participation in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) coordination meetings of the far North region under the co-lead of UNICEF and the far North Regional Delegation of Water and Energy and, as a Partner of Global Water Partnership (GWP) Central Africa, we contributed to the WASH resilience project in the Mayo Tsanaga sub-basin. In 2018, we aim to implement the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach in 150 villages of 3 pilot health areas as part of the support of the government to improve sanitation conditions in rural areas.

What main challenges do you face in your work?

We have no appropriate vehicles, as we need 4X4 vehicles to reach many areas. The self-financing mechanism is still very weak and there is not a long-term program, which could be at least 3-year renewable. Also, we develop our activities in a context of high insecurity (by Boko Haram)

Your work is closely connected with the SDG#6. In your point of view, how important is it to have a global agenda for water and sanitation?

In comparison with Drinking Water Supply, sanitation has often fallen behind government and donor concerns; however, this situation is moving in the right direction as sectorial strategies are increasingly putting sanitation at the top of the agenda. Recent studies have shown the importance of sanitation for improving health, promoting social development and protecting the environment. It has also been shown that Sanitation interventions are particularly effective in terms of cost reduction if we judge the increase in productivity that they induce and the decrease in the diseases and deaths that they allow. With this in mind, in the framework of the International Year of Sanitation (AIA) by the United Nations in 2008, the African continent, with the support of the African Ministerial Council for Water and Sanitation (AWCOW) organized the AfricaSan conference in Durban in 2008. This regional conference culminated in the ambitious eThekwini ministerial statement, stressing the importance of leadership in sanitation and recommending that 0.5% of GDP must be spent on sanitation.

In 2016, the Paris Agreement came into force. It was a sign of commitment and hope for a greener future. With our planet facing extreme weather conditions and abrupt climate changes, we must act swiftly!

Photo: UNDP

As I am writing this article, 13,000 people are trapped in Zermatt, a famous Swiss ski resort, due to an unusually extreme snowfall, the Niagara Falls, on the border of the US and Canada, are partially iced up, Singapore is flooded and a drought in Central Spain is alarming both the authorities and population. And the list is all but exhaustive. Year after year, we are facing increasingly extreme weather conditions that affect everybody’s lives, rich or poor.

SDG 13 is about Climate Action and it has everything to do with our countries’ commitment to put into practice the Paris Agreement. Turning it into reality requires political will, but also the involvement of the private sector, as well as organizations and citizens. The 143 countries that ratified the Paris Agreement have to join efforts and develop national adaptation plans in response to climate change. Developed countries will have to inject about USD 100 billion per year to help achieve target by 2020. Disaster risk reduction strategies and climate change adaptation programs still need to be implemented in many countries to help prevent dramatic consequences such as human losses, forced migration and hunger.

Our Horyou community has been fully committed to SDG 13 through either supporting organizations that monitor and promote climate action, or fostering and participating in meaningful debates about that critical topic. Every year, Horyou organizes the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, a global event that frequently addresses the issue of climate change. SIGEF 2016 was one of the most important COP 22side events in Marrakesh. It hosted many organizations, alongside prominent members of civil society and government officials who highlighted their country’s commitment to climate action.

During SIGEF 2017, in Astana, UN officials, international delegations and private sector experts gathered to assess the most important achievements and urge for more. In 2018, SIGEF will take place in Singapore, and Horyou will take the debate to the next level. More information regarding this fifth edition will be provided shortly!

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote climate action in your region or anywhere in the world. You can also show your support by participating in #HoryouLightChallenge! Be the change, be Horyou!

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