Nature

Eurostat launched a report showing the progression of the European Union towards the 2020 social and economic targets.

The report highlights the main achievements of  EU 2020 targets
The report highlights the main achievements of EU 2020 targets

2020 is only three years from now and, surely, a lot has been already accomplished. Still there’s so much left to do in such short time. One major point raised by Eurostat is that he European Union lacks cohesion between its member States when it has to deliver better levels of employment and productivity while reducing the impact on the environment.

Europe 2020 targets cover five areas of concern: Employment, Research & Development, Climate Change & Energy, Education and Poverty Reduction. Each member state has its own national target within the common targets. By analyzing the data, Eurostat, the statistical office of the EU, produced a report called “Smarter, greener, more inclusive?”, in which it details the Unions accomplishments since 2008, as well as it outlines the programs major trends.

The report thus highlights the “substantial progress” made in the area of climate change and energy, through the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption, combined with an increase in the use of renewable sources of energy. Positive developments have been made also in education, through an increased tertiary education and a reduced number of early leavers from higher education.

The areas where progress was limited were employment and R&D expenditure, while poverty reduction has reached poor results since 2008.

When analyzing each EU Member State data, Eurostat shows there’s still a lack of cohesion among the 27 countries. When it comes to reducing greenhouse gases emissions, for example, States as Portugal and Denmark have surpassed their targets on energy consumption and efficiency when France and Italy are still far from honoring their commitments and are hardly likely to do so by 2020.

From the poverty reduction perspective, only a few countries, like Austria and Bulgaria, have shown a slight development, while Spain and Greece are struggling to reach the 2020 targets. Currently, 23% of the EU population faces the risk of poverty or social exclusion, while employment rates among females have risen since 2008, inducing a vulnerability of this gender group.

Access the full report here

All 2020 targets are directly or indirectly related to the UN Sustainable Development Targets and are part of the EU commitment to the social and economic inclusion of its population.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Reso is a visual artist from France who loves to show the world his pictures of Provençal nature. He chooses to highlight and promote the creativity as first principle and push artistic creation and human realization. One little picture every day gives him pleasure and he has been doing this for the past 10 years.

Small details of nature - this is what Reso's photographies are about
Small details of nature – this is what Reso’s photographies are about

1. Who is Reso?

Reso is not my true name but names are not so important. Overall I am a “non lucrative being” who tries to live as a “not for profit entity”. I am a young French guy born in 1959 in Paris. My father was Black and my mummy is White; So I am « Black & White », like the old B&W photos; it’s my only common point with Photography.

2. What sort of work do you specialize in?

Work is really not the center of my life. However, creativity stays in the middle of my way and the way I took was to publish one daily photo, one photo about the Provençal nature around me. So each day I send one biological medallion drawing a sweet harmonic suite of little mandala. I consider them more as pictures than photography. Small fragments of life … precious pieces of our self-overviews from the board of « The Arch of Zoé », tiny signs, creation’s relics shared on the net. So I specialize in the best manner to do and the way to follow in my daily usage of photography. It is more a question of method, program, contract, pledge. The matter of my use are health, freedom and pleasure and the satisfaction I get to speak with you is very important too!

Compilation of Reso's pictures
Compilation of Reso’s pictures

3. Did you go to school to study photography?

No I did not. I am self-taught. On my own I practice freedom, promenade, meditation, contemplation. So I got all my basic photographic knowledge all along my “Arch of Zoé” practical experience.

4. How long have you been a photographer?

I am making photos but I don’t speak about me as a photographer! I have only started to shoot and to launch my trip on the “Arch of Zoé”. I started this virtual and symbolic journey in 2006, so I make and I post one little picture each day … for 10 years now. Only for the pleasure … and for the big benefits of the creativity.

Provence nature is his main inspiration
Provence nature is his main inspiration

5. How would you describe your style?

I really don’t know. With a reflex… “automatic” elementary shoots and direct simple, like data collecting. The result of a daily promenade I frame and I shoot only what I see. Where I am I usually I shoot things which are looking at me. It depends on the level of my natural contemplation and the more the time is going …the more it is good! Maybe my style is only in the fact to use round caches to frame and to present the natural objects through open small portholes of the “Arch of Zoé”.

6. What gives you ideas and inspires you to create such great images?

I was just thinking about this big part of our human population which is crossing their lives without any contact with her own nature. So I try to claim my opportunity to live in nature and to share this privilege in this little daily drop-off from the “Arch of Zoé”. I am not a photographer. I feel myself more like a performer. To make photos is more important than the photos themselves.

Each day, Reso posts a picture of what he calls Arch of Zoe
Each day, Reso posts a picture of what he calls Arch of Zoe

7. You are on Horyou, the social network for social good. What does to Dream, Act and Inspire mean to you?

Yes, I am on HORYOU… and I am happy to be there. For me HORYOU is an open door on the human hopes. I am happy to be welcomed by the Horyou members and to serve them each day a fragment of Provençal nature seen and picked from the open portholes of the “Arch of Zoé.

Written by Sushma Brelle

    Almir-Surui1

    In 2007, it hit the worldwide media that Google was supporting an Amazonian tribe to track illegal deforestation using technology and the Internet. It was a first and impressive move for this autochthon people, as no tribe had yet used the Internet and technology to speak up or defend its forest. The tribe is the Surui people and today its leader, Almir Surui, travels the world to conferences and Forums to speak about the state of deforestation in Brazil, his home. Horyou sat with him and talked about his humble mission to change attitudes and promote environmental, social and economic responsibility.

    Version Francaise disponible ici Versão em português disponível aqui

    The image of autochthon communities around the world is evolving. Where would you like to see it heading in 20 – 30 years?

    Our role is to improve the public’s awareness so that we can move towards a world that progresses responsibly. This implies environmental, social and economic responsibility by way of using technology as a tool to construct and modify the development models that we have today. I advocate a development that puts humanity first, before quality of life. With our work, I would like that in 20 years the world has started following the steps we put in place today.

    In our modern western society, selfish individualism is a source of motivation, a reason to live. What is your perspective on that attitude?

    I believe that individualism is a factor that can and is destroying society. From my cultural vision, I think that collective thinking, collective rights, collective respect can save us from this mentality. I don’t see any other way, if we have varying opinions, we should at least be able to reach a consensus, find a device that can show us the way to work with each other, each with his own capacity.

    Almir Surui (right)
    ]4 Almir Surui (right)

    More concretely, within the Surui tribe, if a child or an adult for example acts selfishly what is the response of the clan?

    Back home, a child would never act selfishly (laughs); we don’t have that misfortune. If I, the father, am selfish, then my child would learn from me to be selfish too (laughs). As parents, we need to set examples in terms of home education. If my son sees me act in a nonsensical manner, he won’t understand and will want to do the same thing. We are generally easily influenced by the examples and advice of our parents, which is why we must be careful with the way we act.

    As far as adults are concerned, everyone chooses their own problems; that is how we approach things in my society. If I do something wrong, this fault will come back to haunt me. Whatever one chooses to be, there will be consequences. Those who harm others for example, it is not up to us to enact justice, time will take care of that. If I myself punish this person, I will be staining myself with his crime and I will be an accomplice to his crime. The person who does a lot of harm will not be applauded during an assembly; everyone will ask “Who is this man” and his own shame will be the death of him.

    I believe that nothing is engraved in granite; what we must do or say is not pre-defined. Consensus is our indicator on what must change and be corrected to reach our objectives. If I disagree and turn my back on negotiating, we will never be able to correct our mistakes and progress towards a better future together.

    You are known for having allowed the Surui tribe to transition into the modern world, more specifically through the internet, can you tell us about this?

    In the past few years, I have analyzed and observed the suffering of my people. I then decided that my people, the Surui, will not be victim to these modern procedures, that we would get involved in discussions, as well as concerns and solutions offered by the rest of the world in regards to our forest and our knowledge of it. I then needed to define the method by which to do this and so we needed technology and the Internet. Firstly, people had to know who we were and where we live, be acquainted with our occupations and aware of our solutions to this common problem. Information started to flow from a place it had never come from: namely the people living in these forests. We began to understand how we could express ourselves in international debates. For example, when we participate in an event, the people we were invited by, we often meet them at another forum; thanks to the Internet, this is a network that we have to maintain to come up with and share responsible solutions.

    Almir-Surui3

    In 2007, an article published in various media, disclosed that an Amazon tribe had the support of Google to track illegal deforestation; this was your tribe. Do you believe it worked?

    Yes, it worked: the Surui territory is today mapped out in 3D on Google Earth. In addition to this, they help and train us to use their tools: create a map, post on Youtube, etc. And it is we who went looking for them, not the other way round. It helps us better communicate with the Brazilian government and the whole world about deforestation (through precise and documented complaints). If the government would play its part, we would not have to be doing this.

    If you had a message of hope to give to the world, what would it be?

    You have to believe you are important; we have to believe we are important. You have to believe that you are the one that will change the world because it does not change on it’s own. It is a path to change that we must build together so that we can hope to build a better world for all.

    Written by Vincent Magnenat Translated by Amma Aburam

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