inspire

On the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the UN warns about the vulnerability of native populations around the globe.

Native Americans, Indiana
Native Americans, Indiana

Forty UN agencies and other international organizations made a joint statement today, raising awareness on the critical situation of native populations on the 10th anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Despite acknowledging the progress that has been made in terms of their formal recognition in several countries, the UN alerts that they continue to face discrimination, marginalization and lack of basic rights.

Indigenous Raramuris from Mexico
Indigenous Raramuris from Mexico

“While indigenous peoples have made significant advancements in advocating for their rights in international and regional fora, implementation of the Declaration is impeded by persisting vulnerability and exclusion, particularly among indigenous women, children, youth and persons with disabilities,” said the joint statement.

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in some 90 countries around the world. Practising unique traditions, they retain social, cultural, economic and political characteristics, bringing diversity and richness to the societies in which they live.

Indigenous people from Brazil
Indigenous people from Brazil

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, from 13 September 2007, defends minimum standards for the well-being, survival and dignity of indigenous peoples. The document established their rights to self-determination, traditional lands, territories and resources, education, culture, health and development. The declaration took more than 20 years to negotiate and is a benchmark of rights and reconciliation. However, many challenges remain – violence and rights violations are, in some countries, more common now than decades ago.

Indigenous experts from Canada, Congo, Ecuador and Namibia will discuss the issue at a special event at UN Headquarters in New York, on Wednesday, 9 August, International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. UN offices around the world are also celebrating the day with special events and activities, including in Australia, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. In order to raise awareness and promote the anniversary on social media, the UN created a branded emoji for the hashtags #WeAreIndigenous and #IndigenousDay, that will be live from 8 August to 15 September on Twitter.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Eurostat launched a report showing the progression of the European Union towards the 2020 social and economic targets.

The report highlights the main achievements of  EU 2020 targets
The report highlights the main achievements of EU 2020 targets

2020 is only three years from now and, surely, a lot has been already accomplished. Still there’s so much left to do in such short time. One major point raised by Eurostat is that he European Union lacks cohesion between its member States when it has to deliver better levels of employment and productivity while reducing the impact on the environment.

Europe 2020 targets cover five areas of concern: Employment, Research & Development, Climate Change & Energy, Education and Poverty Reduction. Each member state has its own national target within the common targets. By analyzing the data, Eurostat, the statistical office of the EU, produced a report called “Smarter, greener, more inclusive?”, in which it details the Unions accomplishments since 2008, as well as it outlines the programs major trends.

The report thus highlights the “substantial progress” made in the area of climate change and energy, through the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption, combined with an increase in the use of renewable sources of energy. Positive developments have been made also in education, through an increased tertiary education and a reduced number of early leavers from higher education.

The areas where progress was limited were employment and R&D expenditure, while poverty reduction has reached poor results since 2008.

When analyzing each EU Member State data, Eurostat shows there’s still a lack of cohesion among the 27 countries. When it comes to reducing greenhouse gases emissions, for example, States as Portugal and Denmark have surpassed their targets on energy consumption and efficiency when France and Italy are still far from honoring their commitments and are hardly likely to do so by 2020.

From the poverty reduction perspective, only a few countries, like Austria and Bulgaria, have shown a slight development, while Spain and Greece are struggling to reach the 2020 targets. Currently, 23% of the EU population faces the risk of poverty or social exclusion, while employment rates among females have risen since 2008, inducing a vulnerability of this gender group.

Access the full report here

All 2020 targets are directly or indirectly related to the UN Sustainable Development Targets and are part of the EU commitment to the social and economic inclusion of its population.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

The Swiss Pavillion Expo 2017 Astana is committed to the SDGs. From 13 to 27 July, it develops several activities in order to raise awareness about the challenges of building a better future for the next generations.

Horyou CEO and founder, Yonathan Parienti, with Swiss Pavilion visitors (Photo Swiss pavilion)
Horyou CEO and founder, Yonathan Parienti, with Swiss Pavilion visitors (Photo Swiss pavilion)

The Swiss pavilion, organized by Presence Switzerland, showcases the Confederation as an innovative country with an interactive and surprising exhibition on the issues of energy efficiency, renewable energies and global water management. As part of the Swiss Pavillion, the Swissnex Lab is dedicated to thematic immersion and networking, in order to facilitate bilateral cooperation and academic exchange between Switzerland and Kazakhstan.

One of the activities, Perception Change Project, includes a temporary installation with a wheel of fortune that introduces sustainable development, a Human Library involving innovators and presenting a talk on Education and Innovation with experts and changemakers.

Horyou Team attended an event on Education & Innovation on July 18, 2017, and had the opportunity to hear unique stories from speakers invited by the Perception Change Project in cooperation with partner organizations, notably the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the Kazakhstan Institute of Standardization and Certification, the UNICEF Kazakhstan and its Liaison Office in Geneva, the University of Geneva, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), and the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). «Horyou Team was excited to see the commitment of the Swiss Pavilion to promoting the sustainable development goals in Astana. We share the same resolve to shape better times to come, and SIGEF 2017 in Kazakhstan will be our initiative during EXPO2017 to support that momentum of awareness and implementation», said Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou.

Horyou team visits the Swiss Pavillion at EXPO2017 in Kazakhstan
Horyou team visits the Swiss Pavillion at EXPO2017 in Kazakhstan

The event was followed by a project called “Human Books”, whereby people shared their stories with the public, creating empathy by touching on topics such as climate change and education in emergency situations and refugee camps. One of the touching stories was Isaac Mustopulo’s, a 15-year old student from Kazakhstan who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and, despite all odds, has finished 8th grade at a local school in Taraz where he excels academically and is actively involved in extracurricular activities. He is an advocate for inclusion and is working on a project that would introduce tutors to public schools for students with disabilities.

“Sustainable Development Goals are not only the UN’s or governments’ business, we all have a role to play in achieving them. The topics related to the SDGs and the work of organisations in Geneva and elsewhere can be illustrated in a playful manner and through storytelling. We are delighted to be a part of Expo 2017 Astana”, said the Head of Project, Aziyadé Poltier-Mutal.

More than 700 people visited the Swiss Pavilion on its first day
More than 700 people visited the Swiss Pavilion on its first day

Finally, the Education & Innovation Talk session opened a dialogue between several thought leaders. Ms Tatiana Aderikhina from the Education and Child Protection at UNICEF shared how an equity–focused and inclusive approach starting from early childhood education can have positive impact toward social inclusion and reduce the numbers of unschooled children. Mr Zhasulan Kenzhegalyiev, a specialist from the International Cooperation Department of the Unified Government Fund of Normative outlined how Astana is leading the way in SmartCities and how this can benefit both the population and the overall sustainability efficiency. Prof Barbara Moser-Mercer, from the University of Geneva, a specialist in higher education in emergency and crises situations, expressed how connected learning builds the knowledge and skills needed to adapt, and how that could prove to be a key factor in the development of higher education for people victims of conflict situations within refugees camps. Ms Ekaterina Perfilyeva, editor in chief of the Open School of Sustainable Development, shared how through volunteering to support facilitation of translation and sharing of knowledge and meaningful information we could advocate a better understanding and implementation of sustainability principles with the Youth.

The overall discussion from the panelists with the audience, outlined the fact that there are numerous synergies and initiatives that could support the achievement of SDG 4, related to Education.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Fundada em 1985, a Casa Pequeno Davi é uma organização incansável no compromisso com crianças e adolescentes em vulnerabilidade social e em situação de rua. Desde os anos 1990, o trabalho social realizado na capital da Paraíba, João Pessoa, vem se ampliando para atender ao entorno familiar de crianças e adolescentes, atuando também em escolas do bairro do Roger, onde funcionava o lixão metropolitano, e também no estado do Ceará. Hoje, a Casa Pequeno Davi é uma organização que atua nos espaços de formulação de políticas públicas (conselhos, fóruns e redes), conquistando parcerias ao longo do tempo e conquistando a credibilidade da comunidade e da sociedade em geral. Leia mais sobre esse membro ativo da nossa plataforma Horyou!

A Casa Pequeno Davi promove atividades de apoio a crianças e adolescentes na Paraíba e no Ceará
A Casa Pequeno Davi promove atividades de apoio a crianças e adolescentes na Paraíba e no Ceará

Quais são as principais inspirações para o trabalho da Casa Pequeno Davi?

A defesa dos direitos, o respeito à pessoa humana, a ética, a responsabilidade, a transparência, participação, a igualdade e a democracia plena.

Que tipo de impacto a organização deseja causar no mundo?

Uma sociedade justa e responsável, onde os direitos humanos, sobretudo de crianças e adolescentes, sejam respeitados e efetivados.

De que forma as redes sociais e a tecnologia influenciam no dia a dia da organização?

Maior visibilidade da organização por parte da sociedade em geral, possibilitando novas parcerias. Ainda com a possibilidade de inserção do público (crianças, adolescentes e familiares) na chamada inclusão digital por meio dos cursos, oficinas oferecidos pela instituição por meio das parcerias.

Quais foram as principais evoluções da atuação da organização em relação à comunicação e as novas tecnologias?

Visando ampliar sua visibilidade, a organização investiu na comunicação, utilizando todos os meios de comunicação possíveis (site, blog, redes sociais, campanhas e materiais impressos). Hoje, a Casa Pequeno Davi é uma organização de referência na área defesa dos direitos humanos, em especial de crianças e adolescentes no Estado da Paraíba.

A organização faz parcerias para promover atividades variadas com as crianças
A organização faz parcerias para promover atividades variadas com as crianças

Qual a importância de participar de uma rede social do bem social como a Horyou?

No mundo globalizado, a participação em uma rede social com a amplitude da Horyou, é de fundamental importância para ampliar a escala da visibilidade institucional. A conexão com outras organizações, o compartilhamento dos objetivos e das ações fortalece a metodologia do trabalho para o alcance da missão.

Vivemos em uma era de constante transformação. Quais são as mudanças positivas que você deseja para a sua comunidade e para as gerações futuras?

Acreditamos que, em primeiro lugar, precisamos de uma consciência ambiental globalizada porque as gerações futuras dependem do nosso comportamento atual. Não é mais possível conviver com o desrespeito em todos os níveis, seja entre as pessoas, seja com o ambiente em que vivemos.

Estamos contribuindo para a formação cidadã de crianças e adolescentes que são prioridade absoluta, de acordo com o Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente. Esse público precisa ter seus direitos efetivados na prática para que possam ter melhoria na qualidade de vida e um amanhã diferente.

A Horyou é a rede social do bem social. Conectamos e apoiamos iniciativas sociais, empreendedores e cidadãos que promovem a implementação dos Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável da ONU, para que possamos construir um mundo mais harmonioso e inclusivo. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

With a mission statement focusing on childhood cancer support, the Boston-based Richi Foundation has bold objectives via an initiative called Richi Social Entrepreneurs which supports new innovative businesses to generate positive impact in society. Their immersion programs, counselling and sharing of entrepreneurship best practices seek to help shape the future of social innovation. The Horyou blog interviewed Ernest Lara, Executive Director of Richi Social Entrepreneurs.

Richi Immersion Team
Richi Immersion Team

What is Richi Foundation’s mission?

Richi Social Entrepreneurs (RSE) is a Richi Foundation initiative whose mission is to boost startups from around the world that have the potential to generate a substantial positive impact on society, by connecting them with Boston’s innovation key players and helping them take full advantage of this unique innovation ecosystem.

How did The Richi Foundation get started?.

In 2011, the founder’s son, Richi, was diagnosed with an aggressive medulloblastoma. His family, who was living in Spain, brought Richi to Dana Farber, where they literally saved his life. It was then that Richi’s father, Ricardo Garcia, a serial entrepreneur, decided to found the Richi Childhood Cancer Foundation to provide other children with the same opportunity that Richi had. We have built a strategy to raise funds through business units (initiatives) that provide value to society in sectors such as education, innovation & entrepreneurship, and culture. Richi Social Entrepreneurs is one of those initiatives.

You have an immersion program for social entrepreneurs. How does it work?

Our main program at RSE is named Boston Immersion. It is a three-week eye-opening bootcamp in Boston. Startups have the opportunity to embrace best practices from Boston’s unique ecosystem, and to connect and interact with potential clients, investors, strategic partners, and local top notch industry experts who lead them to outstanding synergies.

Social entrepreneurs attend lectures in the immersion program
Social entrepreneurs attending lectures in the immersion program

You have a strong commitment to social entrepreneurship. Can you share some of your projects in this area?

We have worked with very interesting social entrepreneurship projects in our past program editions, which now are RSE Alumni, such as Literates, PIC, and H20 Now. We like to emphasize that, for us, a social entrepreneur is anyone who provides a positive impact to society or environment with his project, being a startup or a traditional for-profit organization. This means that any life sciences or cleantech startup is perfectly eligible to participate in our program.

As a social entrepreneurship supporter and accelerator, what would you say are the biggest challenges for a social entrepreneur?

Generally speaking, for any entrepreneur, some main challenges are: being able to obtain enough deep knowledge about the unmet need the startup wants to address, and finding the correct fit between this unmet need and the value proposition. Additionally, de-risking the project by generating evidences / results to justify that the project is moving towards the right direction is also challenging (partly because of the economic resources needed to prove the assumptions). It’s also essential to convince key stakeholders that they should care about their project (which requires excellent communication skills and strategic focus).

What are the main aspects of a social business you evaluate in order to give it support?

One important thing for us is to make sure that the startup has (or is testing) a business model able to support the organization’s operations and scale globally. Then, we tend to support projects with a high technological or scientific component. And of course, the team is key. It’s key that projects are carried out by complementary teams and supported by experienced sectoral experts.

Entrepreneurs visiting Harvard University
Entrepreneurs visiting Harvard University

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

Every time we see more and more startups trying to provide a positive impact to society or environment with their projects, and this is great. So we think social entrepreneurs will have, every time, more resources and help to boost their businesses.

Horyou connects on its social platform thousands of social entrepreneurs, philanthropists and organizations around the world. In your opinion, what’s the importance of social networks for social entrepreneurship and, particularly, for your work?

Social networks are a great place to learn about new players, resources and influencers. So social networks focused on social entrepreneurs for us is a great tool to meet new projects and stakeholders to collaborate with.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

O fotógrafo Tomás Cajueiro tem um projeto ousado – percorrer o Brasil mostrando as diferentes faces do país a seu próprio povo. O projeto Retratos Brasileiros, que faz uma edição especial pelo estado de São Paulo, é resultado de um trabalho de diferentes fotógrafos que viajaram pelo Brasil e pelo exterior desde 2014 em busca de brasileiros. Além das imagens, o projeto também conta com relatos sobre cada personagem retratado, exposições e palestras sobre fotografia. O Horyou blog entrevistou Tomás Cajueiro, que conta sobre a história do projeto e sua inspiração nas causas sociais.

Foto: Tomás Cajueiro
Foto: Tomás Cajueiro

Como surgiu a ideia do projeto Retratos Brasileiros?

Nasce como uma maneira de colocar um pouco em prática, diversas das reflexões teóricas que eu tive nos meus anos de estudo, sobretudo no mestrado, onde estudei muito identidade nacional e a função do jornalismo e do fotojornalismo como instrumentos de formação de identidade nacional. O brasileiro e o latinoamericano em geral tem uma identidade ainda muito fraca, ainda em construção. O Retratos surge como uma utopia de propiciar uma reflexão que faça o brasileiro pensar quem ele é, quem é o povo brasileiro.

Foto; Tomás Cajueiro
Foto; Tomás Cajueiro

O projeto está em fase de curadoria. Quais são os próximos passos e o plano de divulgação?

A edição 2017 do projeto, que é viabilizado com recursos do ProAC (Programa de Ação Cultural – Estado de São Paulo) está na fase final de curadoria para seleção das imagens que irão compor a exposição e seu catálogo. Serão escolhidas 100 imagens. Os próximos passos serão as exposições em si que devem acontecer em Sorocaba, Araçatuba e Santos. A divulgação acontece pelas redes sociais e assessoria de imprensa.

Como continuidade do projeto, o próximo passo é inscrevê-lo na Lei Rouanet, para que aconteça em nível nacional. Nosso objetivo é voltar o Retratos, a partir do ano que vem, para o Brasil todo, que foi como começarmos. Esperamos fazer isso agora com o financiamento da Lei Rouanet. O objetivo é termos um livro publicado com as próximas imagens, até 2019.

Foto: Érica Dezonne
Foto: Érica Dezonne

Você se sente engajado com questões sociais e de meio ambiente?

A fotografia é uma consequência desse engajamento. Meu engajamento se manifestou através de uma série de trabalhos voluntários que eu sempre fiz. A fotografia, na verdade, nos últimos anos tem se transformado num instrumento que dá voz a esse engajamento social, ela é a consequência. E a maneira através da qual eu acredito que eu consigo dar voz a pessoas que são forçadamente mudas. Sobretudo nesse sistema midiático que a gente vive hoje, bastante mercadológico, muita gente que não vende pauta (jornal) não tem voz.

Com quais causas sociais você se sente mais conectado?

Pessoalmente eu me interesso muito por desigualdade social e inclusão social. São duas causas que me interessam bastante. Gosto muito de trabalhar com pessoas marginais à grande massa da sociedade. Eu acho que o que a gente chama de minoria na verdade é a maioria, são pessoas que não estão no centro do debate sócio-político.

Foto; Daniel Arroyo
Foto; Daniel Arroyo

Na sua opinião, como a arte pode colaborar para construir uma sociedade mais justa?

Acredito que a arte empodera as pessoas, pois gera uma visão crítica, a partir do momento que as tira da zona de conforto. Mexe com um lado do cérebro que não é racional. Acho que faz com que a pessoa tenha a capacidade de pensar mais no abstrato, e a pessoa acaba tendo uma visão de mundo diferente, que não teria se ela ficasse vivendo aquele mundo muito cartesiano que a sociedade põe de frente pra gente. Vivemos em uma sociedade muito pragmática. Acho que a arte é uma maneira de acabar com esse pragmatismo. Assim, as pessoas se tornam mais críticas e fazemos com que a sociedade seja mais justa.

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