The last article of our series 17 steps to 2030 is a call to action. Organizations, governments, individuals and communities are key to achieve all SDGs, but only through cooperation and team work.

Photo: UNDP

The SDG17 calls for a Global Partnership for Sustainable Development. It means that the SDGs must be part of a global, concerted movement that aims for a better future. We’ve witnessed many developments, but more cooperation is required globally – the Paris Agreement, for example, must regain strength in the international arena, despite political sides and differences. It requires more effort from actors that are not necessarily governments. International organizations, NGOs, communities and the media are important stakeholders in the project of leveraging the SDGs and turning them into reality.

Regarding SDG 17, the UNDP has pointed out many achievements such as the increasing amount of international investment in aid to refugees, or the ICT revolution which allowed broadband services to be more affordable and thus more widely available. More countries are engaged in monitoring the effectiveness of their development and 54 of them have reported progress on their SDG commitment. It’s all being done with a broader level of data and accountability, which helps to build trust and stability, as well as strengthens institutions.

All Horyou organizations are connected through our platform and help our society to reach this SDG. They are key actors in building our community, which stands for this Global Partnership for Sustainable Development. It is with that in mind that Horyou launched the #HoryouLightChallenge, which engages people from all over the world towards the same cause: turning the SDGs into reality.

To take the challenge, Horyou invites its members to use their creativity and share their social good actions in connection with the SDGs. The prize for the best post is an all-inclusive trip to Singapore including participation in SIGEF18 (plus many other prizes*).

#HoryouLightChallenge Instructions

  • Create an account on

  • Create your Horyou Light Challenge post (photo, video or text) on the platform with the SDG that you have selected among the 17 SDG examples. You can also create your own positive challenge and post it!

  • Share your Horyou post via Twitter, Instagram or any other Social Media with the #HoryouLightChallenge hashtag, along with the hashtag of the SDG that you have supported (ex: #SDG7)

  • Invite your friends to light (watch how lights work here) your post on Horyou

  • Try to get the largest number of lights and win a trip to SIGEF18 Singapore!

By participating, you help to shed a light on all the organizations and change makers that are part of our community and beyond. Horyou invites you to help achieve the SDG 17 through the power of social media and connection for good! Together, we can do more. Be the change, be Horyou!

Every baby taking its first breath is a potential actor of change. Every teenager living in a healthy environment has the potential to create a stable and happy family. Every woman with access to a safe childbirth is potentially a loving mother. Health is an essential condition to change the world for the better.

Photo: UNDP

What would the world be like when deaths are not caused by neglected or badly treated diseases anymore? The UN Sustainable Development Goal number 3 aims to ensure healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages.

It does not mean that we would no more have diseases and deaths, but that we would minimize avoidable mistakes and negligence. Global maternity mortality ratio, for instance, would be reduced to less than 70 per 100,000 and epidemics of infectious diseases would end by 2030. Road accidents, tobacco-related illnesses and other health conditions caused by lack of access to treatment would not be part of our daily lives either.

According to the UN, many advances have been made on the health front worldwide since 2000. Yet we still have to face realities such as the ones we find in sub-Saharan regions whereby only 53% live births are assisted by skilled people and mortality among children under 5 years of age is 84‰, almost twice global rates. Part of the solution is to prevent early and unintended pregnancies by fighting child marriages and spreading reproductive education; but there is an urgent need to invest and train in skilled care and sound health policies worldwide.

Infectious diseases are yet another challenge to face – HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis B epidemics continue to plague many countries -, and the solution lies in prevention. Vaccines, sanitation and hygiene, as well as sexual education are to be improved. The same applies to premature deaths caused by depression, alcohol and tobacco, all of which are taboo ailments in several regions.

Many of these health risks are directly related to poor quality medical assistance and lack of health coverage and funding, especially in underdeveloped regions. Available data from 2005 to 2015 indicate that over 40% countries count less than one physician per 1,000 people, and around half have fewer than three nurses or midwives per 1,000 people. Almost all least developed countries count less than one physician and fewer than three nurses or midwives per 1,000 people.

Many organizations and social projects did produce some improvement. Child Family Health International, an NGO that is active on our Horyou platform, is one fine example of community-based global health education programs for students and institutions that aim at empowering local communities. CFHI acts on undergraduate medical schools curricula and publishes papers and publications on global health safety on a regular basis.

Based in Cameroon, Ascovime, yet another active member of the Horyou community, runs educational health campaigns and provides free medical consultation and surgery to isolated communities throughout the country. Ascovime was founded by Dr. Georges Bwelle, a surgeon at the Central Hospital in Yaoundé and a CNN Hero.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote health and well-being in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

World Government Summit in Dubai
World Government Summit in Dubai

From the 8th to the 10th of February, leaders from Government, industry and social enterprise gathered together in the gulf of Dubai. It was an interesting setting from more than one aspect.

The city was not so long ago a baron desert, it has literally been built from dreams of what could be and is now home to hundreds of industries and some of the most spectacular feats of engineering and architecture on the planet. One couldn’t think of a more suitable backdrop, considering the agenda of what was to be discussed at the World Government Summit.

It began with a very matter-of-fact address from CEO of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab who, referring to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, stated that “the future is here” and that it is time to mobilize and capture the opportunity that it brings.

The Forth Industrial Revolution covers a multitude of different paradigms, but the narrative of this event was one based firmly on Horyou values: sustainable business.

We have been part of a world up to now that has revolved around the principles of a money making market system whereby lives are sustained on the basis of trade, whether you are trading beans as a farmer in remote Africa or multi-millions in a global hedge fund.

Klaus Schwab, Director of World Economic Forum addressing the audience

Since the global financial crisis of 2008, principles have changed, from global industry down to citizen level.

We are now slowly adapting a more conscious way of living across the board. We are conscious of our impact on the environment, conscious that our patterns of consumption are keeping laborers working like machines and conscious that the payoffs that we deem important are driving policy decisions that feed inequality.

The need to address this balance of cause and effect regarding capitalism was highlighted. Former Prime Minister of France Dominique De Villepin stated that “We need to remember that business exists to enhance society, not create a division among have and have nots”. Alluded to his time in Government where he created a network in France to connect businesses with students and policy makers, he made his position clear on the importance of people connecting for social good.

This was echoed by World Bank president Jim Yong Kim who affirmed that “we all have a stake and the creativity and innovation of youth are our greatest strength.”

Cathy Kalvin, President of the UN Foundation

Then came a passionate speech by President and CEO of the UN Foundation Cathy Kalvin. The UN Foundation and Horyou are aligned on development goals and how to get there. They also share a special connection after spending two days contributing to discussions at Earth to Paris in December. Cathy made a plea for us to harness the potential of a purpose driven society serving the citizens of tomorrow. “We must place a special emphasis on youth. Moving from poverty to prosperity depends on us realizing what they have to offer,” she declared.

It was a stage where we realised the negative impact of our past behaviours, but also a place where real opportunities were highlighted.

Overall, the ethos and real need for Horyou as a platform for social good was reinforced. The success of the Sustainable Development Goals is multifaceted but connecting good hearts and minds is the starting point.

Written by Dearbhla Gavin

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