Equality

The new technology will support and promote social and economic inclusion, bringing transparency and trust to philanthropy

In the last few months, Blockchain has been the buzzword of the financial world. From investors to entrepreneurs, business people have sought to profit from either decentralized systems or cryptocurrencies that are at the core of Blockchain. Yet, the main question everybody should be asking is: could Blockchain benefit beyond the business world in general and investors and speculators in particular?

Horyou, the social network for social good, has just provided an answer while launching its HoryouToken, which is built around the concept of a Blockchain technology with a purpose to support and promote social and economic inclusion. HoryouToken is set to foster a positive circle of interactions for the benefit of civil society at large, as well as social entrepreneurs and social good doers. By using the safety features of the Blockchain, HoryouToken can be used in various ways, including:

1. As a mode of transaction inside and outside the Horyou platform, as well as a Fintech payment solution intended to support philanthropy, through proof of impact

2. To buy or sell products, as well as to subscribe to services and soft commodities that enhance social good within the future Horyou marketplace

HoryouToken aims to revolutionize the act of giving with its truly novel approach, answering the many concerns of social entrepreneurs and investors that look for transparent and social impact projects to fund. “The objective of Horyou is to put Blockchain on a positive trail to solve some of the most crucial challenges. We are giving a humanitarian purpose to Blockchain,” says Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou.

While making it possible for any willing person to support social good, HoryouToken also provides access to a traceable and intelligent philanthropic redistribution service called Proof of Impact. It gives transparency and trust to all the operations made through HoryouToken, while it safeguards the efforts of social impact investors, philanthropists and entrepreneurs.

If you want to know more about HoryouToken go to the TGE website and be part of the HoryouToken community: http://tge.horyoutoken.io

Experts agree that professionals of the future should combine technological and analytical skills with soft skills. They assert that professions which require repetitive, simple tasks will be the most threatened by the rise of technology – and may disappear within a few years. On the other hand, there are two trends that will remain strong: ‘high tech’ professions, which demand high expertise and technological impact; and ‘high touch’ professions, with intense human contact and impact.

 

High tech and high touch professions will coexist in the new economy

High tech

Engineers, doctors, architects, technology professionals and industrial production. They work with new technologies and must know how to analyze data, seek efficiency and productivity for their companies. These activities tend to be mobile or performed remotely.

High touch

Personal trainers, caregivers of the elderly and children, leisure, health and well-being professionals who have good relationship and communication skills. They will use new technologies, but their presence in the work environment will continue to be important.

Most of these professions already exist, and all of them will be impacted by new business and work models, technologies, and changes in our way of life. A teacher, for example, will have his or her activity transformed by e-learning, and must adapt to facilitate student learning, exchanging ideas and proposing paths, rather than ‘holding’ knowledge. Below is a list of professions that should gain more space on the job market in the coming years:

Data Scientist – extracts and analyzes data to be applied to new products and processes across industries and sectors.

Digital expert – searches for evidence of digital crimes, such as data theft and attacks on servers on the Internet.

Sustainability strategist – monitors and plans the sustainability path for companies and organizations. By using and tracking data, can oversee HR policies and environmental impact, as well as vendors’ and communities’ relationships.

Blockchain expert – brings and implements the blockchain technology to company products and services, besides helping to educate their teams with this innovation.

Distance learning facilitator – guides and monitors students’ on-line learning, promoting the exchange of knowledge rather than just teaching classes.

Robot coordinator – monitors robots in industrial plants, makes routine and emergency maintenance.

Manager of mobile teams – guides professionals working in different geographies and schedules, defining strategies and joint goals and tracking results.

Mobile service technician – remotely and real time controls the operation of machines and equipment, identifying problems before they even happen.

When talking about how fast the world around me is changing, I’m often scared of never being fully aware of how these changes will impact my life. As a journalist, I have a relatively good understanding of how newsrooms and content strategy are being impacted by digital marketing, and as a consumer, I can see how simple tasks like purchasing a product, communicating with my friends and even booking a visit at the doctor have been revolutionized in the past few years. However, I’ve always had the feeling that I’m missing something.

The bad news is I AM missing something. The good news is most people are in the same situation. In the past few months, especially during the Bitcoin frenzy that caught everybody at the end of 2017, I saw friends and family investing in a completely unknown technology that frightened me so much I couldn’t even think about it. I started asking questions about it and I realized no one was fully aware of what they were doing. Even some financial journalists and other friends from the financial market didn’t sound very convincing about their level of knowledge about it.

Bitcoin is a brand. It is an open source system created by a mysterious person – or it might be a group of people – who use the nickname Satoshi Nakamoto. Bitcoin is based on this new technology we call Blockchain, which is now used by many governments and industries for many purposes: logistics, contract management, real estate transactions, etc.

But what is blockchain? One source once told me that this task is as difficult to explain as it was the internet in 1995. ‘You have to experience it’, he said. But after this, he went through a complicated explanation that I will try to simplify here.

Blockchain is a group of people – let’s say that each person is called block – that control and validate transactions. So, if I transfer money to you, this information is not only registered in the bank data center but is distributed among all the blocks. In the case a data center is hacked, for example, the transaction still exists because there are more agents aware of it.

It works because the longer and diverse the chain is, the harder it is to fraud. Every block needs to validate the chain of blocks that came before it, which makes it even more secure (it’s virtually impossible to ‘bribe’ someone since the identity of the block is safeguarded).

But what about my data? It will circulate among all those people and they will all know my personal banking information and who am I transferring money to? It depends. If the data is encripted, it’s protected. If not, well, you mustn’t trust people holding your data. It’s 2018 and we’ve seen what is happening.

The Blockchain potential is still being discovered by many industries, and I dare to include the financial world among them. New currencies are being launched, new services, products and solutions are being announced, but even the experts are not unanimous about how deep this new technology is going to impact our lives. If it’s really comparable to the internet in 1995, we will see another revolution coming.

The revolution I want to see, though, is how Blockchain will go beyond profit and greed. All this connectivity, safety and collaboration features could be amazing were it to solve some of humanity’s challenges, including migration, climate change and inequality. Some initiatives are already set; one of them is HoryouToken, a new Blockchain-based decentralized system that will enhance traceability and security of philanthropy. Since Horyou has developed a new concept for social media and the Internet, HoryouToken makes me hopeful that Blockchain can have a purpose.

I will witness the revolution.

The Asian city was recently named top country for meeting UN health goals and has already achieved 4 of the 17 sustainable development goals. Here’s the story.

Singapore has already achieved 4 of the 17 sustainable development goals

The year is 2015. A coalition of countries, Singapore included, have adopted the UN Sustainable Development Goals and two years later 43 of them presented Voluntary National Reviews in which they committed to specific goals. Despite the regional and national commitments, many countries are still far from reaching the voluntary goals they set for 2030 but some are taking a straightforward path. Singapore is one of them.

According to the SDG Index and Dashboard Report, Singapore has already reached four out of the 17 SDGs (1, 7, 8 and 9), the highest number in all South and East Asia. The city-state is also closer than any other country to meeting health-related targets, according to a global health review published by The Lancet Medical Journal last September. Singapore is now placed at the 61st position out of 167 countries in the SDG Index.

Its Achilles’ heel is the import of emissions, including nitrogen and carbon dioxide, which is common in small countries due to their need to import and trade goods. In order to improve this scenario, Singapore should whether diversify its economy or set trade policies so the imported goods would be more sustainable.

As for the other SDGs, Singapore is clearly investing in reducing gender inequalities, promoting education and strengthening institutions. The literacy rate has now reached 99,9% and the rate of female labor participation in the workforce is over 76%. The quality of institutions and the safety of the population is one of the highest in the world.

The evolution is ongoing. The city is making an effort to host more events related to the SDGs, such as the Unleash Innovation Lab, next May, and the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, SIGEF 2018, Horyou’s main SDGs event, next September. In addition to bringing diversity and innovation, the events help the city to become known as an SDG-friendly place and a hub for ideas and actions to attain the goals.

A new member of Horyou platform, the Haiti Cholera Research Funding Foundation (HCRFF) invests in education and awareness to prevent health issues in developing countries

Pierrette Cazeau

Despite being born in Haiti, Pierrette Cazeau grew up in New York and Florida, in the US, and thus was never aware of the country’s challenges until she first visited it as a grown up-woman. She was struck by the challenges faced by its population on a daily basis – lack of health infrastructure, corruption, abuse, poverty and hunger. That changed her life as she decided to devote her time and efforts to build a Foundation and use education to prevent such disasters as the 2010 cholera outbreak.

«You can’t predict natural disasters or climate change effects, but you can educate people to prevent and reduce poverty. Without education, you just open the door to the negative effects of the unpredictable», says Pierrette, founder of HCRFF. The NGO was created in 2013 and has since developed many projects to support and empower communities facing health and social problems. «We’ve seen so many victimized people sitting quietly, and that escalates anger and hate». Economic and social problems, she believes, are part of a cycle that comprises disruption, refugee crisis and racism.

Syphilis Project

Focusing on education, the foundation organizes workshops for students coming from challenging backgrounds. In addition to preparing them for work via professional education, and providing them with food, HCRFF also raises awareness of topics like HIV prevention (PrEP and PEP), sexual abuse and other sensitive topics that are critical for the new generations. The NGO also helps Haitians to get access to health care in the US by providing them with transportation, shelter, advocacy and even translation services whenever needed. It also supports pregnant Haitian women left behind by UN peacekeeping soldiers.

The next step is to expand the Foundation services to other countries including Ghana, in Africa, where it intends to start an education campaign on HIV and other STDs. «We need more sponsors as we never charge anything for the services we provide to the communities», says Pierrette. For the last three years, the NGO has been funded by partners, but new sources of financial support are needed. One of the plans is to organize a Marathon for People Living with HIV and raise funds for the cause of education for prevention. «One thing I’ve learned from my father is that education can’t be taken from you. It stays with you forever. I’m grateful for all the educational opportunities I’ve had and I wish more people keep benefitting from it as well».

The host city of SIGEF 2018 is a reference in MedTech and new technologies as indeed Singapore aims to be at the upfront of a promising market with the right setup to attract both investors and innovators.

(Photo: RENDY ARYANTO/VisualVerve.SG)

Singapore is home to more than 60 MedTech companies which are mainly focused on research to develop new and innovative health care approaches. It is, indeed, a promising market. According to the Singapore Economic Development Board, the Asian medical technology market is expected to be the world’s second-largest by 2020, with a promise of a better life expectancy and quality of life.

In the last few years, the government has made a big effort to build a welcoming infrastructure for these businesses, either by investing in patient care based on a talent pool with big data and analytics skills, or by developing a supportive ecosystem which counts on research institutions, universities and startups, all of which provides the MedTech companies with a rich and fruitful research and development hub.

This ecosystem allows for companies like Tictrac – an app developing company which focuses on tracking health data and giving tips and information to its users -, to come up with solutions for patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases. In a recent interview, Martin Blinder, Tictrac CEO, confided that: “It is for people to find reliable information about the best way to reduce risk and improve their health. After meeting their doctor, people go home with some very high-level information, often go online and end up finding a lot of contradictory information or dangerous fat diets”. The company has a partnership with the Singaporean Ministry of Health, which aims to use more technology to prevent and manage diseases.

The successful combination of a friendly environment for MedTech innovation and public-private partnerships has pushed many companies to be more willing to invest in this market. In the last few years, a number of Singaporean IT businesses have set up MedTech operations in order to profit from the market’s good prospects. The electronic manufacturer Venture Corp is one of them and has been shifting their investment to LifeSciences and Medical Technologies, which now represent 43% of their revenues.

In a speech at a MedTech event last year, the Minister for Trade and Industry S. Iswaran stressed the importance of investing in new health care technologies knowing that populations are getting old and that artificial intelligence is taking over most industries. “We know that the nature of jobs is changing profoundly, as technology and automation play an increasing role in driving innovation and operations,” he said. “We need to transform our societies and economies to become more age-friendly, and turn longevity into a positive force for economic and social development.”

The host city of SIGEF2018 next September is thus the perfect place to bring together innovators and entrepreneurs from all over the world. Organized by Horyou, it will include a special panel on MedTech.

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