As we celebrate the International Women’s Day, we must reflect upon the challenges many women and girls face around the globe

International Women’s March

Whether a Rohingya refugee or a famous actress in Hollywood, being a woman requires an extra level of resistance and hope. The last few years have opened many eyes on the situation of women around the world, especially concerning sexual harassment and the fragility of the gender equality speech when it comes to true representation and parity on the work field.

Yet, we have much more to accomplish. Here are a few numbers from UN Women to consider: 1 in 3 women experience violence in their lifetime; 830 women die every day from preventable pregnancy-related causes; and only 1 in 4 parliamentarians worldwide are women. It will be 2086 before we close the gender pay gap if present trends continue with no action.

What can we do as a society to accelerate equality in our world? Awareness campaigns surely help, as #MeToo and many other hashtags spread the message that we are equal in our experiences and concerns. We’ve learned that feminism is not the opposite of sexism, it’s solely the true hope to be equal in a broad, respectful way. Marches around the world passed the message that we, as women, own our bodies, our choices, our sexuality. That we must be heard and respected. But is it enough?

The new International Women’s Day theme this year is «Time is Now: Rural and Urban Activists Transforming Womens’ Lives». It celebrates strong, fearless activists whose work is key to all the transformations we’re witnessing as a society. More important than being a voice, they are role models for our girls and boys, the next generations that will hopefully put their message into practice. Activism is key, and female activism is the remedy to invisibility.

Despite a long history of prejudice and ignorance, these women are getting their voices increasingly heard. From Malala Yousafzai, who’s shown that education matters for girls, to Amal Clooney, who was brave enough to be the first lawyer to sue ISIS for its crimes, to Noriko Mitsui, Horyou ambassador to Japan, whose work for social good has been recognized by members of the US Congress and its Multi Ethnic Advisory Task Force which ranked her among the Top 20 Women of Global Excellence. To mothers, waitresses, teachers, housewives, who fight against poverty, prejudice and domestic violence.

Many of them might not be able to march. I’m marching for them, though. I want to resonate their voices. Because #Timesup to be silent.

Written by Vívian Soares

Horyou supports the SDG5, which aims to empower women and girls for gender equality. You can be part of it too either by supporting one of Horyou organizations which work for this SDG or by participating in the Horyou Light Challenge, that aims to raise awareness of gender equality. Be the change, be Horyou!

Have you ever heard of ‘smart cities’? It’s a contemporary expression that designates good, effective urban planning which uses technology and creativity to solve perennial urban problems such as air pollution, traffic control and energy consumption. Forget flying cars – although they could play a role in future cities – and think about planning, data analysis and efficient use of resources.

Photo: UNDP

We are now almost 4 billion people living in cities, more than half the global population. And urbanization keeps growing – 1 billion more will move to or be born in cities in the next 12 years. It’s a logical trend. If living in cities would mean more access to jobs, healthcare services and quality education, then it would be a reasonable outcome that millions of people would prefer to live in urban areas. Yet, it’s not always the case. Many cities still provide poor public services and infrastructure and thus have to face such challenges as the proliferation of slums, or air pollution, or again inequality and violence. How to address the challenge? Innovation and sustainability are the key words to make the SDG 11 a reality.

The good news is that in 2017, 149 countries have been developing national-level urban planning programs, many of which are using available and inexpensive technologies. In the last 17 years, some things did change for the better. The proportion of urban population living in developing country slums fell from 39% in 2000 to 30% in 2014. More cities are supporting healthier lifestyles, calling people to use cleaner means of transportation. Others are implementing incentives to reuse and recycling waste, as well as running water saving campaigns. Still, management of waste and air pollution, for instance, are below World Health Organization acceptable levels.

Universities, governments and international organizations are working together to come up with ideas that tackle the many issues urbanization imposes. There is no panacea, as each community faces its own specific challenges and, ideally, the best solutions have to be worked out internally, best in cities that are hubs of innovation and diversity.

Horyou community is passionate about Smart Cities. Both SIGEF 2016 in Marrakesh and SIGEF 2017 in Astana panels covered extensively the topic and helped trigger important discussions about the future of transportation, energy and sustainable construction. SIGEF 2018, due to take place in Singapore, will, in turn, bring together experts, government officials and organizations to propose sustainable solutions and replicable ideas that are liable to make our cities better places to live. It’s Horyou’s commitment to a society that we aspire to build together!

If you want to be part of SIGEF 2018, read more about the #HoryouLightChallenge. You can choose the SDG11 or any other, promote your post on social media and win an all-inclusive trip to SIGEF in Singapore, in September 2018!

Barcelona is hosting its 8th annual Corporate Social Responsibility Week, an event which connects the public sector to companies and non-profit organizations to discuss the recent developments in CSR. Horyou team has visited the venue and reports on some success stories.

8th CSR Week Barcelona took place from 14th to 18th November

What can a food bank do about global warming? Why should a healthcare and beauty products industry career coach unemployed women? Those are merely signs that CSR is pushing companies to go beyond their backyard. We all find profit in a better world.

The 8th edition of the annual CSR Week in Barcelona was an indication that many companies are trying to run the extra mile through their environmental and social actions. On a panel titled «Conferencias Soc-Eco-Amb», held on Tuesday, four organizations from very diverse industries showcased their actions.

Miguel Ángel Trabado, Henkel Beauty and Healthcare regional head of Professional Partnership Services (PPS), shared the «Fundación Quiero Trabajo» experience inaugurated this year. The project provides hairdressing, clothing, styling and professional coaching to unemployed women, helping them to recover from a job loss and restore their self-confidence. So far, 53 women have received assessment and advice, and 71% have found a new job. «It’s important to notice that most of the work is done by volunteers, and the great majority are women as well», he said. It is a global project that has produced remarkable results in Spain, with a high rate of successful job placements.

Speaking for Metro de Madrid on its recently launched CSR Policy, in line with the 11th and 13th UN Sustainable Development Goals on Sustainable Cities and Climate Action respectively, Monica Mariscal insisted on the company’s commitment to invest in innovation and technology in order to deliver the best user travel experience. Metro de Madrid is thus reusing 80% of its consumed water and, in 2017, it will reduce by 25% its energy consumption. Insisting on the responsibility to cater for the vast diversity of its users, she disclosed that «From a social perspective, the company has a commitment to diversity, and is building accessible stations and training both employees and people with disability to better use the metro». The goal is to have 73% of all stations accessible to people with disability by 2030.

Ana Gonzales talks about the CSR and Environment projects in Caprabo

As for the national supermarket chain Caprabo and its microdonations program, it is striving to reduce food waste, as well as to support people in need. Hence, the company donate small quantities of its unsold products – a pack of eggs in which just one is broken, for instance -, to non-profit organizations or food banks. This sounds simple but it requires some logistics in relation to food preservation and employee training to send out only items that are safe for consumption. According to Ana Gonzales, in charge of CSR and Environment for Caprabo, «The program is a success as it helps to feed 788 families per year. It also reduces food waste by more than 2,000 tons».

Caprabo micro donations go to organizations like Banc dels Aliments de Barcelona, a food bank that provides 18,000 tons of food to 137,000 people in Catalonia. In addition to putting meals on needy families tables, the organization has recently signed an agreement with the public sector by which it is working on reducing CO2 emissions. According to Joan Bosch, Economic Resources Coordinator, it is an extra challenge they are happy to take. «We have changed all our lamps to LED and are looking forward to reducing our emissions by more than 2,300 tons of CO2 in 2017», he stated. It is all done thanks to volunteering work and donations, and we aim higher each year. «Poverty is more intense and chronic than ever. We cover only 27% of families in need, and we expect to improve this number and the quality of what people are eating», he added. It will be done, of course, with lower emissions and the tireless commitment to building a better society.

O Brasil é o campeão mundial de violência contra as pessoas transgênero – além da gravidade das ameaças físicas, há outro tipo de violência menos visível. O preconceito contra essa parcela da população leva à marginalização e à falta de oportunidades de trabalho, estudo e integração à sociedade. Pensando nesse cenário, a empresa de bebidas Pernod Ricard Brasil fez uma parceria com as ONGs Transemprego e a Casal para lançar uma iniciativa de transformação e inclusão: um programa que oferece cursos profissionalizantes gratuitos na área de coquetelaria, já que essas pessoas encontram mais abertura no ambiente de bares e casas noturnas. Cinco turmas já foram organizadas e os participantes já vêm usando modernas técnicas nacionais e internacionais para preparação de coqueteis e atendimento ao público. No final, todas ganham um certificado da Drink Design, que é uma das empresas mais renomadas do Brasil nesse quesito. Entrevistamos Luana Iurillo, porta-voz da Pernod Ricard Brasil, sobre essa iniciativa de inclusão e profissionalização.

Alun@s do curso de profissionalização em coquetelaria

Quando e por que a Pernod Ricard decidiu lançar o projeto de formação do público transgênero?

O treinamento de bartenders para o público transgênero faz parte de uma campanha chamada Absolut Art Resistance. Essa campanha possui foco no público LGBTQ+, especialmente nos Transgêneros. Por isso, firmamos parceria com artistas renomadas como Mc Linn da Quebrada e As Bahias e a Cozinha Mineira, que permeiam este universo. Por outro lado, não temos como pensar em Transgêneros sem levar em consideração que essa parte da população ainda é muito vulnerável na sociedade por causa do preconceito e, por isso, enfrenta mais obstáculos do que o normal para ingressar no mercado de trabalho. A partir disso, pensamos em oferecer o curso de bartender e barback para gerar conhecimento a esses participantes para que eles possam ter qualificação para trabalharem em eventos e festas.

Já existia algo parecido no exterior ou foi uma iniciativa 100% local?

Absolut apoia a arte e a criatividade como motores do progresso no mundo todo desde a década de 70. Porém, por mais que a campanha Art Resistance retrate o posicionamento global da marca, este é um projeto idealizado pela Pernod Ricard Brasil. Estamos sempre apoiando produções do universo artístico e LGBTQ+. Um exemplo claro de que isso está no nosso DNA é que, recentemente, aqui no Brasil, Absolut foi uma das primeiras empresas a se posicionar publicamente em sua fanpage sobre a polêmica da “cura gay”. Além disso, no passado, a marca já firmou parceria com grandes nomes da arte, como Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, Joyce Tenneson, Ross Bleckner e entre outros.

Qual o potencial a empresa vê nesses alunos?

Os participantes estão enxergando nesse curso uma oportunidade de profissionalização. Tornar-se um bartender profissional exige muita disciplina e técnica. Todos eles conseguiram assimilar isso já no primeiro dia. Eles estão bastante animados e recebemos um retorno que ficaram muito felizes com essa chance que estão tendo. Para nós, é gratificante poder participar ativamente dessa formação e acompanhar de perto a evolução de cada um deles. Esperamos que eles sejam os primeiros a gerar uma consciência para o mundo sobre a grande oportunidade que existe de profissionalizar pessoas com um grau de energia e força de vontade para fazer a diferença. E que tudo isso não tem a ver com identidade de gênero ou orientação sexual.

Vale ressaltar ainda, que, este ano, Absolut promoverá uma festa como parte das ativações da campanha Art Resistance. Nesse evento nós vamos convidar os melhores alunos do curso para já atuarem profissionalmente, colocando em prática todo o aprendizado que foi adquirido. Além disso, vamos indicá-los para toda nossa rede de fornecedores que atuam nesse universo de festas, bares e mixologia. Uma ótima notícia é que até os sócios da Drink Design já sinalizaram interesse em chamar alguns alunos para fazerem parte do staff da empresa.

Horyou apoia as iniciativas de inovação social que ajudam o mundo a alcançar os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, e é organizadora do SIGEF, o Fórum de Inovação Social e Ética Global. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

The Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES), an event co-organized by the United States Government and the Republic of India, will take place in Hyderabad, India, on 28-30 November. This year, it will highlight the theme Women First, Prosperity for All, and focus on supporting women entrepreneurs and fostering economic growth globally.

Acting Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs Alice Wells delivers opening remarks at the U.S.-India Business Council Road to GES Entrepreneurship Conclave, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Washington, D.C. (Photo: U.S. Chamber of Commerce)

A strong group of entrepreneurs, government officials and impact investing actors will attend the event, reflecting the GES diversity of cultures and expertise. The Summit aims to foster the conditions that empower innovators to take their ideas to the next level. Horyou will present aspects of its experience as a social network for social good, in resonance with this inspiring social innovation initiative. Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou, has been invited by the US State Department and its Permanent Mission to the United Nations in Geneva to attend the GES and speak for the network on the topic of “Go For It: Tapping Alternative Financing Solutions”. Before the international attendees, he will share his vision and perspective around the launch of Spotlight, the first digital currency for impact that supports philanthropy and economic inclusion.

With Spotlight, as well as its many other events and initiatives, and Foundation, Horyou supports the implementation of the 2030 Agenda of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, while aiming to provide philanthropic support to millions of social entrepreneurs, women, youth and social good projects.

Horyou founder and CEO Yonathan Parienti with members of the US State Department from the US Mission in Geneva

«It is a great credit to our efforts to be given such a unique opportunity to share with this international audience the disruptive innovations we have been working on over the past few years at Horyou to further social good and to set up more harmonious conditions for economic inclusion», says Mr. Parienti. «Horyou, the social network for social good, has many stories to disclose about inspiring women, with our member organizations, whose initiatives lead by example in shaping a better future for their communities », he adds.

The Global Entrepreneurship Summit is one of the most important annual entrepreneurship gatherings in the world in that it showcases the efforts of both emerging and developed countries to answer the challenge of furthering joint business opportunities worldwide. GES 2017 aims to create an empowering environment for innovators, especially women, to take their ideas to the next level. The Right Honorable Prime Minister of India, Mr. Narendra Modi, is expected to inaugurate the Summit on 28 November 2017 and Mrs. Ivanka Trump, advisor to the President of the United States on advancing policies and initiatives for women empowerment, is due to lead the US delegation. As she recently reminded the World Assembly for Women in Tokyo: «Ensuring 50% of our population can fully participate in the workforce is critical to strengthen our communities and grow our prosperity».

Ivanka Trump at the World Assembly for Women in Tokyo

GES participants will be supported by mentors and coaches, through workshops and networking sessions, and will be provided with opportunities to meet funders, build partnerships and find their target customers. Plenary sessions will highlight businesses led by women and their stories while master classes will discuss innovative topics as Blockchain, Fintech and e-commerce. «It is an amazing ecosystem to be part of and feel inspired by, due to the diversity of its participants. We will be there to speak the language of social entrepreneurship to shape a better future for the generations to come», concludes Yonathan Parienti.

Horyou blog will provide regular GES updates! Be the change, be Horyou!

On the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the UN warns about the vulnerability of native populations around the globe.

Native Americans, Indiana
Native Americans, Indiana

Forty UN agencies and other international organizations made a joint statement today, raising awareness on the critical situation of native populations on the 10th anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Despite acknowledging the progress that has been made in terms of their formal recognition in several countries, the UN alerts that they continue to face discrimination, marginalization and lack of basic rights.

Indigenous Raramuris from Mexico
Indigenous Raramuris from Mexico

“While indigenous peoples have made significant advancements in advocating for their rights in international and regional fora, implementation of the Declaration is impeded by persisting vulnerability and exclusion, particularly among indigenous women, children, youth and persons with disabilities,” said the joint statement.

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in some 90 countries around the world. Practising unique traditions, they retain social, cultural, economic and political characteristics, bringing diversity and richness to the societies in which they live.

Indigenous people from Brazil
Indigenous people from Brazil

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, from 13 September 2007, defends minimum standards for the well-being, survival and dignity of indigenous peoples. The document established their rights to self-determination, traditional lands, territories and resources, education, culture, health and development. The declaration took more than 20 years to negotiate and is a benchmark of rights and reconciliation. However, many challenges remain – violence and rights violations are, in some countries, more common now than decades ago.

Indigenous experts from Canada, Congo, Ecuador and Namibia will discuss the issue at a special event at UN Headquarters in New York, on Wednesday, 9 August, International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. UN offices around the world are also celebrating the day with special events and activities, including in Australia, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. In order to raise awareness and promote the anniversary on social media, the UN created a branded emoji for the hashtags #WeAreIndigenous and #IndigenousDay, that will be live from 8 August to 15 September on Twitter.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

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