Brazil

Em São Paulo, jovens da comunidade do bairro de Pedreira colocam mãos à obra em programas de aprendizado em sintonia com as demandas do mercado de trabalho

Projeto é voltado a adolescentes de 14 a 17 anos

Conhecido pelos desafios econômicos e sociais, o bairro de Pedreira, na zona Sul de São Paulo, consta na lista dos distrito com os menores índices de desenvolvimento humano (IDH) da cidade. Nesse contexto, a vida pode ser dura para os jovens: longe dos principais centros empregadores e com pouco acesso à educação de qualidade, eles se encontram limitados em suas opções de carreira.

Pensando em dar mais alternativas a adolescentes de 14 a 17 anos, o projeto Área 21, uma parceria entre o Instituto Tellus, a Brasilprev e o Conselho Estadual dos Direitos da Criana e do Adolescente, vem oferecendo formação na área de tecnologia e empreendedorismo. O projeto, que conta com metodologia inovadora e um laboratório onde os alunos podem exercer sua criatividade usando ferramentas como impressoras 3D e equipamentos de realidade virtual, foi lançado este mês e já tem 320 inscritos.

A estrutura do programa lembra a de muitas escolas inovadoras de empreendedorismo: o Área 21 usa técnicas de design thinking e gamificação para que os alunos aprendam a solucionar problemas. O desafio final é criar um protótipo de start up.

Objetivo do programa é ser um laboratório de empreendedorismo e inovação

Uma das apoiadoras do Área 21 é a seguradora Brasilprev, que tem como objetivo unir sustentabilidade à inovação. «Esperamos que as experiências e interações vividas por eles ao longo do projeto os deixem mais bem preparados para entrar no mercado de trabalho, não eó em relação aos conhecimentos técnicos mas também nas competências comportamentais», afirma Cinthia Spanó, gerente de Comunicação Corporativa e Sustentabilidade da Brasilprev.

A gerente explica que a empresa se envolve há muitos anos com projetos sociais e de desenvolvimento comunitário, como a Fábrica de Ideias, que também apoia a ascensão profissional de adolescentes em situação de vulnerabilidade e risco social. O projeto, realizado em parceria com o Instituto Reciclar, ajuda o jovem a escolher sua profissão e a desenvolver suas competências socioemocionais.

Diversos estudos sobre o trabalho do futuro vêm apontando que as carreiras das próximas gerações exigirão mais competências comportamentais e menos conhecimentos técnicos, já que estes estarão sempre mudando e se atualizando. “No século 21, vivemos a inclusão de diversas tecnologias, e o jovem precisa, acima de tudo, se preparar e aprender a enfrentar novos desafios. É importante que ele não tenha medo de resolver problemas”, afirma Henrique José dos Santos Dias, um dos educadores da Área 21.

Horyou apoia as iniciativas de inovação social que ajudam o mundo a alcançar os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, e é organizadora do SIGEF, o Fórum de Inovação Social e Ética Global. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

Inspired by the ‘invisible beings’ of one of the biggest cities in the world, the photographer Edu Leporo started to depict homeless people and their dogs in São Paulo, Brazil. The photography essays soon became a social project which now, through donations and funding campaigns, provide care for street dogs and their owners. Edu Leporo is our interviewed personality, a member of our platform Horyou and a change maker for good.

Edu Leporo with Angela, Diego and the dog Spike, who live on the streets of São Paulo (Photo: Gu Leporo)

When and why did you start taking pictures?

I started my photographic records of homeless people and their dogs in 2012, in an unpretentious way. Walking through downtown São Paulo, I saw a homeless man sitting with his dog and wondered: what would their reality be like? As a professional photographer, I have always worked in studios and did photographic essays of moms with their pets. But this has awakened an uneasiness in me and pushed me to do something for those who could not have a portrait – that is the people who live on the streets with their companions.

What was your inspiration?

My profession as a photographer of pets and my love for animals made me register the reality of the streets! To record and tell the stories of love, respect and companionship that go unnoticed by the eyes of thousands of people, certainly, inspired me.

In your work, you unite two causes, the animal care and the homeless people. Apart from photography, is there a social project behind these causes?

After I made several records of homeless people with their dogs, I decided to make a photographic exhibition with this material. All on my own. Gradually, I went looking for partners and we also managed to make a book with these records. That was in 2015. Using the images captured on the streets was my choice to shed light on these “invisible” beings. Soon after, in 2016 we started the Social Project for Street People and Their Dogs (in Portuguese, Moradores de Rua e Seus Cães). We started with a few donations, and today we take action every month in the center of São Paulo where we take all the services and donations for dogs, such as: bath, vaccine, vermifuge, beds, guides, collars and food. For the human, toiletries kits, clothes and shoes and we serve a breakfast.

Photo: Edu Leporo

What were the most striking situations you encountered during this project?

On the streets, there are many remarkable and rich stories. But I want to highlight the story of a couple that touched us a lot: Angela and Diego. They have lived for years on the streets with their dogs, Spike and Star. We have recently discovered that she has Leukemia and we feel the need to help her with her treatment. Fortunately, we were able to start a beautiful campaign with support from ZeeDog and raised funds for Angela’s treatment.

What are the next steps?

Our actions consist of 70% donations (individuals and companies) and 30% money, which we use to buy breakfast items, for example. But this cash aid is always lacking. Today, we seek a support / sponsor to meet our needs, ranging from items for breakfast to relief and treatment for some dog. We plan to launch our second book, with photos and street stories, as well as taking the photographic exhibition to all the capitals of Brazil and abroad. Start the project in schools, giving young people the opportunity to engage in the cause. We also want to set up a mobile community laundry, where street people can wash, dry their clothes and their dogs. Our mission is to open our eyes, hearts and minds, feel that we are only in the beginning.

Change Makers is an Horyou initiative which aims to highlight remarkable people & projects related to the Sustainable Development Goals. In this article, we shed a light over #SDG10 – Reduced Inequalities and #SDG15 – Life on Land.

Biodiversity is the ecosystem that has shaped the environment which allowed for human life to exist millions of years ago. Preserving this ecosystem is thus key issue to our survival, failing that, then this would pose a serious threat to human existence, as heralded by the extinction of a number of other living species.

Photo: UNDP

In Greek mythology, Flora and Fauna were goddesses who represented many aspects of ancient life. While Flora, goddess of spring, would be used as a symbol of youth and fertility, Fauna was mainly described as a strong female figure who could foresee the future. According to the elders, Fauna’s songs resonated the fate of humankind.

Which fate would Fauna be singing today? Come every spring, may we still see any future for youth and fertility? Living in a world where technology allows for men to conquer space in search for other viable ecosystems, deforestation and loss of biodiversity are still huge sources of concern on earth. SDG 15 is a call for the protection of life on land: not just animals but everything around us – trees, fungi, mountains, land and native populations.

According to UNDP, progress in preserving and sustainably using Earth’s terrestrial species and ecosystems is uneven. The good news is that more forests are being protected and many countries are putting policies and certifications in place to safeguard their ecosystems. But the effort made by governments and NGOs is not enough. Many key biodiversity areas are still under threat as they are not protected. Even when they are, the lack of inspection, added to corruption, make preservation more difficult. Land productivity has been declining since 1998, especially in South America and Africa, which aggravates desertification, security issues and land conflicts. The UN estimates that more than 1 billion people are currently endangered due to these problems.

The international community is committed to support and conserve biodiversity, either by signing agreements or by donating bilateral funds to biodiversity projects. Apart from that, NGOs are tirelessly working to raise awareness of the urgent ‘life on land’ cause.

Horyou is proud to host organizations such as ANDA, the first and largest animal news agency in Latin America. Based in Brazil, with more than 1.5 visitors a month, ANDA is an active voice on animal rights and shares news about scientific tests on animals and poaching, as well as the appalling conditions in farms, among other critical topics. They are trying hard to enforce SDG 15. Are you willing to do the same?

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps protect life on land in your region or anywhere in the world. You can also show your support by participating in #HoryouLightChallenge! Be the change, be Horyou!

There are many faces to inequality, and just as many ways to deal with it

Photo: UNDP

A few days ago, an 11-year old was prohibited entry to a shopping mall, in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil. The security guards claimed he was too young to walk through the mall unaccompanied. The kid was startled as he pointed to other minors hanging out unbothered in that same mall – with no adults. The unspoken reasons, he and his mother later said, were his color of skin and the unsophisticated clothes he was wearing. For he, indeed, is poor, and does not fit into the mall’s ‘dress code’, that middle-class shopper sanctuary.

Income inequality has many faces. It may be a boy who is not wearing the right clothes, and it may be a woman who is not earning a man’s salary for the same position and job; all situations that reflect one of the biggest challenges of our times which is what the SDG number 10 addresses: how to build a more equal and fairer society among and within countries.

According to the UNDP, the poorest 10 percent earn only between 2 and 7 percent of total global income. And inequality is on the rise: in developing countries, it has increased by 11%, with consideration to population growth. Solutions are multidisciplinary – they require strong institutions, regulation of financial markets, development assistance and support on migration and mobility. There must be stronger policies for vulnerable groups like women, children, refugees and people with disabilities, as well as more funding of and support to NGOs whose work has a positive impact on reducing inequalities.

Many members of the Horyou community are tireless workers towards reaching this SDG. And speaking of people with disabilities, the Horyou platform hosts a very active member organization called Nos, Why Not? It is the first photo agency whose workers are photographers with intellectual disabilities. Based in Spain, it offers them visibility and promotes inclusion through training and providing them with work opportunities.

Another active member of the Horyou community is Serviço de Obras Sociais, a Brazilian NGO which seeks partnerships with the government and private sector to support vulnerable populations such as the homeless and migrants.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote equality in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

The 6th United Nation Sustainable Development Goal is about providing clean and safe access to the most precious liquid on earth for all.

Water and Sanitation for all. Photo: UNDP Philippines

Two years ago, a major environmental disaster struck Brazil – the liquid waste reservoir of the mining company Samarco burst, wiping out a village, killing 11 people and poisoning the waters of the Rio Doce, a water source that supplies two Brazilian states. The riverside population and fishermen have been facing difficult times since. The water is still unsafe to drink, and the iron contamination has exterminated the local fauna. Scientists predict it would take 100 years for the river to fully recover from the catastrophe. And what of the fundamental right to a safe source of water? The question remains unanswered and it’s an everyday struggle for all communities to exercise their right to satisfy this basic need.

The 6th UN Sustainable Development Goal aims to provide access to safe water and sanitation and sound management of freshwater ecosystems for all by 2030. Both are essential to human health, as well as to environmental sustainability and economic prosperity.

The UNDP reports that over 90 per cent of the world’s population uses improved drinking water sources and over two-thirds use improved sanitation facilities. Yet, most rural areas in underdeveloped countries have to cope with the lack of both, and the resulting bad health consequences. «Achieving universal access to basic sanitation and ending the unsafe practice of open defecation will require substantial acceleration of progress», says the report published in 2017.

A fourth of global population lives in countries with water stress, meaning they are vulnerable to future water scarcity by not having enough renewable sources. Countries in Northern Africa and Western Asia already face severe water stress. This is a matter of public policy; however, the participation of other actors, including organizations and local communities, is key to effective water and sanitation management.

WESDE trains health agents to act within communities

Within our Horyou community, the organization WESDE – Water, Energy and Sanitation for Development is very active in providing integrated water resources management, sanitation and health education in Cameroon. WESDE acts in both rural and urban areas, supporting the most vulnerable populations with information and resources for development.

Another member of the Horyou platform, EAA Burundi, created in 1988, is active in more than 35 African countries, as well as in Israel. It helps supply drinking water, using innovative solutions like dry latrines and simplified sewer networks, while supporting the communities through agricultural, financial and development projects.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that helps promote water and sanitation in your region or anywhere in the world. Your support can be made easier and more effective with Spotlight, our digital currency for impact. Check it out and start using it to engage in any cause you feel concerned about. Be the change, be Horyou!

More Stories

Una referencia en arte urbano en Barcelona, Nau Bostik tiene una historia que remite al pasado industrial de la ciudad – la nave abandonada...