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Being a social entrepreneur requires more than good intentions and resilience. Like any company, social enterprises need planning, a solid business model and cooperative networks. Through initiatives like The Global Good Fund and its support, social entrepreneurs are empowered and have access to tools to develop their businesses and become global leaders, bringing positive changes to the world. Carrie Rich, GGF’s CEO spoke to Horyou Blog and announced that applications are open for the 2018 Fellowship.

Global Good Fund fellows
Global Good Fund fellows

What is the scope of The Global Good Fund’s work?

The Global Good Fund develops social entrepreneurs into impactful global leaders through its Fellowship Program. Each Fellow is paired with a c-suite executive who serves as mentor, and is provided proprietary leadership assessment resources, a network of peers, sector expertise, and targeted financial capital. The result is confident leaders who scale their social enterprises and deliver sustainable positive social impact. We believe growing leaders is the most effective strategy for solving complex social problems and achieving global good. The Global Good Fund is currently seeking social entrepreneurs for its 2018 Fellowship Program -Apply Now.

As a social entrepreneurship supporter and accelerator, what would you say are the biggest challenges to be a social entrepreneur?

The two responsibilities that I focus most on as a social entrepreneur are similar to how a traditional entrepreneur spends her time. I focus on our people internally and growing our revenue model. We are fortunate to have an incredible team of dedicated professionals who consistently go above and beyond to support each other while serving the social entrepreneurs we are privileged to support. That culture does not happen by accident, rather our people are a core component of The Global Good Fund that require attention and nurturing over the long haul. Second, we are committed to growing our earned income so that we are financially viable long term. It’s exciting to find mission aligned methods to sustain our organization in addition to philanthropy.

The Global Good Fund focus in leadership development
The Global Good Fund focus in leadership development

What are the main aspects of a social business you evaluate in order to give it support?

We focus on the leadership development of individuals as the vehicle for growing social businesses. We look for social entrepreneurs who are full-time committed to their work, have enough “ego-strength” to stand by their convictions, and enough humility to be coachable.

Are you committed to the Sustainable Development Goals or do you address some of the SDGs with your projects?

We are not explicit in our commitment to the SDGs. We are philosophically aligned in that several of the social entrepreneurs we support lead enterprises that address the SDGs by focusing on health, poverty alleviation, gender equality, education, energy and water sanitation.

Global Good Fund
Global Good Fund

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

Many of my peers (millennials) aim to work for companies that have strong social values. Others are creating their own businesses when employers don’t meet social enterprise standards. I imagine a rich future wherein social values permeate business culture as millennials assume leadership roles.

On its social platform, Horyou connects thousands of social entrepreneurs, philanthropists and organizations around the world. In your opinion, what’s the importance of social networks for social entrepreneurship and, particularly, for The Global Good Fund’s work?

The Global Good Fund brand and community is largely built on social networks. We thrive as an organization when we connect with partners around the globe who share our commitment to growing high potential young leaders who are using business for social good.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

As the social entrepreneurship landscape gets more promising, it also becomes more challenging and complex – there are many different types of ventures and business models to develop, while many youngsters crave for help and guidance through this process. The Social Venturer Anika Horn has been working for years supporting young social entrepreneurs, through advisory, acceleration programs and community building. Anika gave this interview to our blog about the biggest challenges and trends for social entrepreneurship.

Anika Horn and a team of social entrepreneurs
Anika Horn and a team of social entrepreneurs

What is the scope of your work?

I work with purpose-driven entrepreneurs from inception to established businesses through one-on-one advisory, programming and community building. I spend a lot of time supporting mission-driven entrepreneurs in building up their companies, and curating the community around certified B Corps, social entrepreneurs and socially responsible companies.

What are the biggest challenges for social entrepreneurs?

At first sight, the challenges that social entrepreneurs face are not that different from the ones that “regular” entrepreneurs face: Defining your niche, validating the market, building a financially sustainable business model, pricing, finding investment, marketing on a startup budget, building the model to scale. It’s the commitment to a double or even triple-bottom line that adds nuance to each of these challenges. Pricing is not just a question of willingness but ability to pay, any cost structure is likely to reflect not only financial expenses but the social or environmental impacts.

A second challenge I foresee for social entrepreneurs is standing out from the noise. Unfortunately, I see a lot of self-declared social entrepreneurs who might have a good story but lack substance in terms of real business stamina, actual outputs and success metrics. These so called social entrepreneurs muddy the waters of what real social entrepreneurship can do and achieve, and make it harder for those who are serious about creating lasting change through business to be taken seriously.

Anika assesses and helps to build social enterprises and communities
Anika assesses and helps to build social enterprises and communities

Can you share some social enterprise success stories you have assessed?

One challenge in the world of social entrepreneurship is how success is defined. Is it creating market access for a marginalized community? Is it lifting three individuals out of poverty, or three thousand? In that sense, defining success becomes a challenge in and of itself. Two entrepreneurs I have been impressed with over the last year are Rupa Singh of Love this RVA, and Jeff Beck and Adam Dreyfus of Answers Now.

Love This RVA is a platform for socially responsible shopping and conscious consumerism. Rupa started out with a co-founder with whom she ended up parting ways, is now running the online and airstream shop by herself, has growing number of speaking engagements, and is figuring out her financial model. She might never scale nationally, but she is successful in making a deep impact in the mindsets of the community she lives and operates in.

Jeff and Adam are developing a mobile app to support parents of children with autism. As first-time founders, I met them when they had little more than the idea. It is unimaginable for an outsider how much time the backend tech development takes, how many sprints and delays and iterations they have gone through. Adam and Jeff are successful because they are designing their service through constant conversations with their target customers. I celebrate their learning process in the lean startup sense over any potential revenue they currently generate and I see great potential in their ability to scale and expand the application to other underserved communities.

Anika Horn
Anika Horn

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

I personally hope that we come to understand that social entrepreneurship is just that: entrepreneurship that leverages hard-to-crack opportunities in the market. With all the Ubers, Instagrams and nutrition bars in the world, real opportunities for disruption lie in areas of social and environmental injustice: lack of equal access to education and healthcare, large-scale upcycling of ocean plastic waste, reintegration of ex-convicts – these are the kinds of untapped opportunities that will impact millions of lives and therefore have a promising future. But they are nuts to crack.

Horyou is the social network for social good. How important are social networks for social entrepreneurs?

Launching and running a social enterprise can be a very isolating, frustrating, lonesome experience. Not every social entrepreneur qualifies as a Schwab or Ashoka Fellow. Social networks can provide accountability, connectedness and as trivial as it may sound: inspiration. Sometimes knowing that others are just as crazy trying to change the world around them is what it takes to get back on the horse. Besides, entrepreneurs have so much to learn from each other; why not use social networks to steepen that learning curve by creating a space for meaningful conversations and knowledge exchange?

What is your main lesson from working with social entrepreneurs?

Don’t be a heropreneur. I have met too many self-acclaimed social entrepreneurs who want to save the world in some way and would figure out what issue they were passionate about along the way. I understand that we as Millennials look for purpose in our careers but the answer isn’t always to become a social entrepreneur. In fact, most social entrepreneurs who are doing great work don’t refer themselves as such, and certainly didn’t start out by wanting to become one. While I commend everyone who knows they don’t want to work for the man but go change the world, there are a million and one ways – or at least five – to make a meaningful contribution that do not involve “become a social entrepreneur”.

I believe that real social entrepreneurs are in a position to redefine the impact of entrepreneurship by creating meaningful systemic change. Let’s not call everyone with good intentions a social entrepreneur and focus our resources on the founders who have the right intentions, the potential, and the tenacity to change the world.

Horyou is a supporter of social entrepreneurship and social ventures around the world

Facing a challenging scenario with high youth unemployment rate, increasing digitalized economy and need for social development projects, the UNCTAD has launched a campaign to stimulate new generations to become entrepreneurs.

Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba Group, and  UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi
Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba Group, and UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi

The #e4youth campaign was announced during the 2017 UNCTAD E-commerce week, from 24-28 April, in Geneva. It came at a crucial moment when governments are looking to develop strategies on how to deal with a changing economic and social landscape brought about by the digital economy.

“E-Commerce can unlock new opportunities for young entrepreneurs. Not by accident but from deliberate, targeted acts of inclusion and empowerment”, said UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi, adding ” We cannot leave this important generation behind”.

The words of the Secretary-General resonate with the UN Sustainable Development Goals motto: Leave no one behind. According to the International Labour Organization (2016) and Youth Business International, 71 million young people are currently unemployed and the global youth unemployment rate to expected rise by 13% in 2017. #e4youth campaign is a call for the international community to support and enable youth to contribute to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development by creating new businesses, jobs, and digital solutions for the future.

“The digital transformation implies disruptive changes to business models across sectors thereby affecting the nature of jobs and the skills young people need to successfully enter the labour market”, said Dr. Kituyi. “We must create opportunities for the young generation and consider them as partners in all our discussions for a successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda”, added Dr. Kituyi.

The E-Commerce week took place in Geneva
The E-Commerce week took place in Geneva

One of the special guests of the E-Commerce week was Jack Ma, founder and chairman of the Alibaba Group, and UNCTAD’s Special Adviser for Youth Entrepreneurship and Small Business. “Globalization is still the solution, and trade is still the solution for solving job creation in the next 30 years”, said Jack Ma. At the UNCTAD E-Commerce Week, youth agreed that technologies and e-commerce offer the opportunity to chart a new path for globalization and provide huge potential to drive inclusive and sustainable development in a rapidly changing economic environment. “E-Commerce is for young people, it is for small businesses. And I think globalization and trade are the solution for job creation in the next 30 years” said Jack Ma.

During the e-commerce session, young men and women shared experiences and expressed their views on key issues to address in order to allow young people to contribute to and benefit from the digital economy.

#e4youth is linked to the sustainable development goals 1 (poverty), 4 (skills development), 5 (gender equality), 8 (decent work and inclusive economic growth), 9 (industry, innovation, and infrastructure) and 17 (partnerships for development).

Social Good Summit cover

One part of technology, two parts of social innovation, mixed with a generous deal of good intentions and a pinch of thoughtful investments: voilà! We have a recipe for successful social entrepreneurship. Horyou blog is media partner of the Social Good Summit, an impact investment and social innovation event which took place in Geneva on the 6th of October, during which we followed the journey of real-life changemakers and now share their stories!

Organized by Impact Hub in conjunction with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the one-day event was focused on promoting social entrepreneurship and impact investing for the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Dozens of entrepreneurs, investors, media and organizations shared success stories and inspiration to transform the world into a better place.

The Social Good Summit took place at Impact Hub office, in Geneva
The Social Good Summit took place at Impact Hub office, in Geneva

The opening speech was delivered by Sarah Bel and Maria Luisa Silva, from UNDP who called for the engagement of all actors to pursue the agenda of SDGs. The private sector and innovators are key participants on this social good path as “we will need an incredible amount of innovation in the next 15 years, and that’s exactly what the private sector does better”, said Maria Luisa. Karen Wilson, from the OECD, asked: “Why invest in social innovation? Because it makes good business sense – it is an innovative and increasingly accountable way to diversify portfolios”.

The Summit was then open to the real stories of young and brave finalists of Accelerate 2030, a social impact supporting program which received more than 177 applications from 10 countries. The 5 best projects were presented during the Social Good Summit. There were amazing stories such as Agruppa’s, a Colombian startup who has helped small food shop owners to buy 30% cheaper and be more competitive only by aggregating their demand in a mobile technology solution; or Ignitia’s, a tropical weather forecast company much more accurate and with a strong focus on small farmers from climate change vulnerable areas in Africa.

Agruppa was one of the Accelerate 2030 finalists
Agrippa was one of the Accelerate 2030 finalists
All the entrepreneurs gave a short pitch to the audience and then answered questions about their business models, challenges, potential grey areas and future developments. All of them were looking for investors and shared their prospective plans with a very engaged public.

Many of them face the challenge of maximizing their impact. “Good leadership, quick learning and simple business models are important drivers”, said John Ayliffee, CEO of Swiss Idea Box. Access to talent and to financing are also challenges, according to Krisztina Tora, from the UNLTD, especially in developing countries – difficulties like finding good back office professionals were mentioned by some entrepreneurs during the event. All of the speakers shared a vision for 2030: a world with equal opportunities for all social entrepreneurs, shared business models and markets. Deeper and broader positive impact on society.

Ignitia provides weather forecast for tropical regions
Ignitia provides weather forecast for tropical regions

Investors also had the opportunity to express their views on innovative ventures. Bertrand Gacon, from Lombard Obier bank, sees mainstream investors increasingly accepting the idea of impact investments – he believes entrepreneurs still have to work on liquidity mechanisms to be more attractive. Katherine Millinga, from Schwab Foundation, added that social enterprises should leverage technology, distribution and aggregation solutions to attract more investors.

Aymeric Jung, from Quadia, believes sustainable businesses are a matter of survival. “Impact investing is the new economy”, he said. Ivan Agabekov, from INOKS, explained impact is not a subcategory of investment – according to him, performance and impact should not be excluding.

The Social Good Summit ended with their visions of the future – a more impactful one, with more innovative and profitable social entrepreneurs and a true aim to turn the Sustainable Development Goals into reality. Being a strong supporter of the SDGs, Horyou shares their views and believes that the future lies in social innovation & social good. 2030, here we go!

Written by Vívian Soares

From September 22-24, the University of Central Lancashire Cyprus will be the stage for the 2016 Grand Jury to share their expertise and experience and to select this year´s Winners of the European Youth Award (EYA)

European Youth Award selects innovative projects made by young entrepreneurs
European Youth Award selects innovative projects made by young entrepreneurs

On that occasion, 20 international experts will meet in Larnaca, Cyprus, to select one to three winners in each of the eight European Youth Awards Categories, from a shortlist of 49 digital projects out of 167 submissions from students and entrepreneurs.

“This year again, the European Youth Award offers an outstanding selection of innovative digital projects using digital communication and IT to improve society and tackle pressing challenges. The passion and willingness to drive positive change of these young people is remarkable. The international experts of the Grand Jury will provide their time and expertise to select the best projects in the eight categories for #EYA16“, says Peter Bruck, founder of EYA.

A highlight of the EYA Grand Jury meeting will be the Expert Forum, held on September 23rd and open to the general public. During the Forum, the EYA Grand Jury experts will discuss current challenges for digital entrepreneurship. The Grand Jury and Expert Forum in Cyprus are hosted by the Ministry of Energy, Commerce, Industry and Tourism, the Digital Champion of the Republic of Cyprus and the University of Central Lancashire Cyprus.

The selected one to three best digital projects per category of 2016 will be invited to the winners event, the EYA Festival, which will take place in Graz from November 30 to December 3. During the event, they will present their projects and solutions on stage and have the opportunity to gain knowledge and prime contacts through a special mentorship program lasting from September till December. The dedicated mentors are business personalities like Anna Wypior (SAP, Germany), who will coach the winning teams and provide business know-how, entrepreneurial expertise and experience.

European Youth Award is a Horyou partner with SIGEF 2016.

IMG_41321

Each day we see the wonderful work of our Members, Personalities and Organizations on the Horyou platform. They are always Ready to Act! This week, we highlight the work and actions of great Organizations from Belgium, Cameroon and Brazil.

Association: Youth Proaktiv
Location: Belgium

Brussels-based YouthProAktiv aims at creating a generation of young people who are proactive. Its ambition is using these individuals’ talents and skills to improve society by starting their own businesses and creating jobs for themselves and others. The organization is organizing the International ProAktivity Summit for 2016. The conference involves the networking of young entrepreneurs and professionals, as well as proactive university students, to discuss their relevant ideas and concerns. There will be debates with decision makers on topics such as youth entrepreneurship and education.

Discover this action here and participate.

by Amma Aburam

educapeace1

Association: Educapeace
Lieu: Cameroun

L’action de cette association est un simple appel à agir pour donner accès aux besoins sanitaires de base à chaque personne. Educapeace trouve inacceptable qu’un enfant soit exclu de l’éducation par manque de moyens de ses proches ou pour d’autres raisons. Leur mission c’est d’aider les familles à scolariser leurs enfants mineurs pour la primaire et la secondaire.

Ce mois-ci ils présentent une action au sujet de l’hygiène des enfants à l’école. Les enfants de l’école Nkolmbong Kama n’ont pas d’accès a des WC et font leurs besoins derrière une salle de classe. Une cause sure de maladies lié au manque d’hygiène. L’idée de cette action est de pouvoir construire de latrines et améliorer les conditions sanitaires pour l’école.

Découvrez et participez à cette action, ici.

par Amma Aburam

lacorosa2

Fundação: Laço Rosa
Localizada: no Brasil

A Fundação Laço Rosa é um portal na internet voltado para a divulgação sobre a detecção precoce e combate ao câncer de mama. No site, o leitor encontra informações, apoio e suporte emocional por meio do compartilhamento de histórias de sucesso, além de artigos de especialistas: médicos, fisioterapeutas, psicólogos e advogados. Uma espécie de “porto seguro” para aqueles que se defrontam com o diagnóstico de câncer de mama em sua vida ou na de alguém próximo. A Fundação inicio uma bela ação que tem como objetivo a celebração da vida e resgate de autoestima à pacientes em tratamento de quimioterapia.

Descobra e participe desta ação aqui.

por Edriana Oliveira Major

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