technology - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search

Artificial Intelligence means new perspectives for governments and corporations… and everybody else

Technology has answered many humanitarian challenges, trying to foster inclusion at a pace that was unimaginable only a few decades back

After years of covering some of the most important technology events in the world, I was happy to witness the rising of AI for Good. While 2018 saw a burgeoning approach to Artificial Intelligence as it became the central theme of a few panels in major global forums and conferences or a key resource in innovative projects developed by a still modest yet resilient number of blue chip corporations, 2019 has obviously given the subject its momentum. AI is a market expected to grow from USD 21.46 Billion in 2018 to USD 190.61 Billion by 2025, and AI for good seems to be the new frontier to explore, according to a McKinsey studyFrom startups to established tech operators and from governments to social entrepreneurs, it suddenly seemed like the whole tech industry was finally on the right launch pad to propose devices and services that improve both our lives and natural or manmade environments and, ultimately, preserve the planet.

Education is one of the industries that have been positively impacted by AI and has potential to grow 38% per year, reaching an approximate market value of 2 billion USD by 2023. Gamification, along with assessment and tutoring programs are being widely implemented by corporations and governments to boost learning ratios, even in remote impoverished or isolated communities while reducing costs and, eventually, helping attain the related UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG4). Now quality education seems indeed a reachable objective where it is most needed. Robots are taking center stage in educational projects, whether to teach students about coding and AI or to coach them, thus improving their level of interest in technology-related topics.

For governments, AI has proven effective in security projects, helping cities to secure big events through improved surveillance, using connected devices including drones, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi devices to better control road traffic or the air quality. Cities like Barcelona and São Paulo have been forerunners in that regard, while making sure their policies meet the aims of the related UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG11), specifically recommending the implementation of smart city policies.

Another major concern relating to sustainable development being population welfare, especially regarding food security, smart farming strategies are at the center of many country agricultural sustainable improved productivity programs, one of the biggest concerns of our times. AI for farming, include IoT, is a promising market and, only in the US, is adopted by 250,000 farmers, who are collectively spending almost 1 billion USD. And that’s in line with the UN SDG2. Producing food for an ever-increasing population in times of dramatically severe climate change certainly is the ultimate challenge of our society – and AI is indeed offering a highly estimated contribution. Companies that monitor crops and livestock, and those that are in the business of optimizing the efficiency of health plans, are part of the same trend, which otherwise rely on complex microclimate predicting algorithms and communication tools reaching out to farmers, providing them with more accurate information.

In a nutshell, AI for Good is good. In times when competitiveness, productivity and transparency are inevitably defined in terms of sustainability, they have no other option but to be intrinsically connected to smart, clean and socially impactful devices and services. Technology has answered many humanitarian challenges, trying to foster inclusion at a pace that was unimaginable only a few decades back. It is now the appropriate time to look at AI, as well as at its developers, and consider them as allies in the process of shaping a better world.

Join us! If you want to showcase your product, service or project in AI for Good, apply to speak at SIGEF 2019.

    HoryouToken,
    The 1st Digital Currency for Inclusion and Advancement of the UN SDGs, Presented at the WSIS 2019 Forum

    The most prominent ICT Forum was the right setting for Horyou, the social network for social good, to establish the relevance and timeliness of its digital currency with a purpose

    PR_application-01_03

    Geneva, April 2019 — HoryouToken was introduced by Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou, the social network for social good, at the World Summit on the Information SocietyWSIS Forum 2019 -, the most prominent global ICT event co-organized by United Nation agencies ITU, UNESCO, UNDP and UNCTAD, which gathered industry representatives and government officials from 193 countries and took place from 8-12 April, in Geneva.

    During a high-level policy session on inclusiveness and access to information, as well as in a workshop around HoryouToken*, Yonathan Parienti, initiator of the concept of a Blockchain with a Purpose, elaborated on the relevance and timeliness of a socially inclusive digital currency. His contribution to the forum, especially in the ‘Technology for Sustainable Development and Impact in an Ever-Changing World’ workshop, highlighted the role of HoryouToken to support social good actions, information and projects, echoing the UN Sustainable Development Goals. While making it possible for any person to support social good, HoryouToken also provides access to a redistribution service called Proof of Impact, a traceable, transparent system that will monetize daily transactions and fund real-world social good projects, people and organizations around the world.

    Many entrepreneurs, citizens and members of the youth are waiting for the extra push for their projects and social good actions, which can be made through visibility but also funding. This is the reason why we developed a currency for inclusion – a transparent, decentralized way to impact people, leveraging a global community of changemakers”, said Mr. Parienti during the high-level policy session.

    Yonathan Parienti highlighted the power of social networks like Horyou, which promotes meaningful connectivity amongst its global community, spreading to more than 180 countries. “These citizens are shaping tomorrow’s world and sharing initiatives that touch their hearts. They represent culture, art, diversity and advance innovation“, he added.

    The WSIS Forum has traditionally promoted cutting-edge discussions about disruptive innovations thanks to its crowdsourced agenda, which has put topics such as Big Data, AI and Blockchain at the center stage, gathering from innovative corporations and startups, government officials to members of the youth and social entrepreneurs. ”Being among such important actors in this ecosystem is a mere proof that we are following the right path for social innovation and technology for good”, declared Mr. Parienti.

    *HoryouToken (HYT) is listed on CoinTiger and LATOKEN.

    Contact:
    Vivian Soares, Horyou Media Relations
    media@horyou.com
    +41 (0) 22 321 98 20

    The Asia Pacific Summit takes place in Singapore and will discuss the developments and trends of the Blockchain Financial Industry

    Chain Plus will take place in Singapore from 11-12th April

    What do top investment institutions, start-ups, traditional financial giants and disruptive entrepreneurs have in common? They all are looking at Blockchain finance. The financial industry is most likely the first area where Blockchain will be widely used, according to the Ethereum co-creator Vitalik Butarin. It has developed many purposes and today, it can have even a social impact. One example is the recently launched HoryouToken, the ‘Blockchain with a Purpose’ which supports and promotes social and economic inclusion.

    2019 Chain Plus Asia Pacific Blockchain New Finance Summit, which will be held in Singapore on April 11th-12th, intends to discuss the main advances of the Blockchain Finance and uncover the new trends in the industry. Speakers on Chain Plus will include: Piotr Jan Pietrzak, chief innovation officer at ING, the world’s 11th largest asset manager; Zhukuang Lee, head of product innovation at Standard Chartered Bank, Kelvin Tan, head of capital market innovation & technology operations department of DBS bank, the largest commercial bank in Singapore and Andrew Pudovikov, software development engineer at the blockchain laboratory of Sberbank, Russia’s largest state-owned commercial bank.

    In addition to big banks and investment institutions, cryptocurrency exchanges, venture capital firms and government officials will also attend, as it covers almost the entire ecosystem of Blockchain. Global leaders from around the world will attend to discuss and present various topics about the Blockchain industry, cryptocurrency, decentralized networks and finance. Attendees will gain a wealth of insights and information about the state of the Blockchain industry through discussion and networking parties.

    Horyou is pleased to act as a media partner of the Chain Plus Asia Pacific Blockchain New Finance Summit. As a gift to our community, all Horyou members can profit from a free ticket – apply for it using the promotional code TBGC0314 at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-chain-plus-asia-pacific-blockchain-new-finance-summitsingapore-tickets-55261439453

    Tokyo will host the next SIGEF as it plans to become an example of sustainability by 2020

    Tokyo is the host city of the 6th edition of SIGEF

    Tokyo wants to set a good example for the world. As it braces to host the 2019’s edition of SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, the city is aiming to reach the highest standards of sustainability by 2020, when it will also host the Olympic and Paralympic Games. With its ‘Be Better Together – For the Planet and For the People’ slogan, Tokyo is indeed committed to develop sustainable solutions and showcase them to the world.

    The Olympics are not the only reason the city is heavily investing in sustainability. 2020 is indeed the final date for a 7-year plan whereby the Japanese government aims to make Tokyo the ‘world’s most environmentally-friendly low-carbon city’. Part of the transformation includes the revitalization of the urban area while surrounding the city with water and greenery.

    The initiatives are broad and they resonate with the UN Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to promoting ideas like zero waste and reducing carbon consumption, the city shall otherwise rely on technology to make the 2020 Games a landmark in sustainable management. One of the projects includes fuel cell vehicles and renewable energy (see image). The city wants to equalize the greenhouse gas emissions by stimulating public transportation, reusing water and recycling not only waste but also buildings – the plan includes using existing venues and avoiding building new ones.

    These are some of 2020 Tokyo Olympics goals

    The 2020 plan also includes:

    – Creating more than 500 hectares of new green space in the city

    – Ending free distribution of plastic shopping bags

    – Equipping metro facilities with 100% LED lighting

    – Using recycled metal for the production of all the medals for the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo Medal Project)

    – Equipping the Olympic stadium with solar-power and a rainwater retention system.

    In order to promote so many changes in such a short time, the Japanese government is seeking partnerships with other countries, especially regarding public transportation, air pollution and waste management. Last year, the city hosted the Tokyo Forum for Clean City and Clean Air, gathering representatives from 22 cities around the world which shared their experiences in smart and sustainable management. Next September, Tokyo will host the 6th edition of SIGEF, the most important Social Innovation and Global Ethics forum in the world, organized by Horyou and covering the following topics:

    • Artificial Intelligence for Positive Change
    • Fintech and Blockchain
    • Sustainable Lifestyles
    • Technology and Life Extension
    • Sustainable Development Goals
    • Renewable and Future Energy

    Over the next few weeks, Horyou blog will showcase all the initiatives that are being developed by the Japanese government to transform its capital – and the whole country – into an innovative, sustainable and peaceful society, inspired by the UN Sustainable Development Goals. 

    While many companies are still pursuing blind profits, these businesses are following the path of circular economy, transparency and technology for good

    Doing Good, Doing Well is Horyou’s Media Partner

    Do you know what your clothes are made of? Maybe of cotton obtained from monoculture fields, full of pesticides, or of organic hemp or cotton more environmentally friendly? You would probably know if it’s the latter – companies that walk the ‘green’ walk are making an effort to communicate to customers about their sustainable practices.

    Companies like Patagonia, the apparel industry that, for decades, has invested in fair trade, sustainable supply chain and recycling projects, are examples of a growing business trend where transparency and commitment to the planet are the rules, while good revenues are a natural consequence. Ryan Gellert, general manager of Patagonia for Europe, was one of the executives invited to share his experience during the Doing Good, Doing Well (DGDW) conference, Europe’s biggest event on responsible businesses. Organized by MBA students of IESE Business School, the event took place in Barcelona, Spain, on 4-5 March.

    Gellert’s keynote about Climate Crisis and the Role of Businesses went about the importance of being socially responsible not only as a business but about providing good quality jobs for employees and vendors, promoting thoughtful consumption among clients and pursuing carbon neutrality. It also went as a committed promoter of change. Besides the main apparel business, Patagonia has invested in documentaries about nature, has set a venture capital to support green businesses and has a project for grassroots environmental activists, among other social good actions. Gellert stressed the importance of consumers, employees and civil society to make changes through decisions like purchasing a product or applying for a job. “Individuals need to act and not only be someone who just falls into a path that was designed for them”, he said.

    Another company that has shown its commitment to the future was Schneider Electric, represented by its Chief Strategy Officer, Emmanuel Lagarrigue. The company has developed many clean energy projects throughout the years, providing green, affordable solutions to big cities big or small communities in rural Africa or the Amazon rainforest. In his presentation “Better Businesses for a Better Planet”, he stated that the world has no space for greenwashing, or companies faking sustainable practices. “There are many recent examples of businesses lying about their commitment to the planet. At the age of digitization and transparency, it’s not allowed anymore. People are becoming more conscious and companies with these fake practices will be short-lived”, said Mr. Lagarrigue.

    Isabel Garro, Special Adviser for the Agenda 2030, Spanish High Commission, gave an inspirational talk about how businesses should keep reinventing the future of our planet. “Every entrepreneur is a superhero because they work with purpose and passion. We have no right to be pessimistic”, she said.

    The DGDW, a Horyou media partner, covers a range of topics like Future of Work. Feeding a 10 Billion World, Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Follow DGDW and keep informed about their activities, and about Horyou’s coverage of the conference on Twitter.

    The Mobile World Congress (MWC) and its side event 4YFN, have some successful experiences to share with the social good sector

    The Mobile World Congress took place from 25-28 February, 2019

    Until a few years ago, the social good world was considered as a unique entity, completely separated from the regular businesses. Although it had common goals with the public sector, it was then clear that the ‘charitables’ or ‘non-profits’ shared few traits with the for-profit industries. The good news is, these times are over. Last week, as I dug in two most disruptive conferences, the MWC and 4YFN, I learned not only that social businesses have never been more interesting to the tech industries, but that they have many lessons to learn about them. Here are some the tech industry takeaways for social entrepreneurs:

    They want to invest in social businesses – Regardless of industry, many big corporations have substantial open innovation budgets to invest in startups that bring positive change in their businesses. Clean energy, sustainable mobility, simplified and accessible payment projects, affordable healthcare, all of these are examples of areas that are in the radar of big companies. There was never a better time for social businesses to be funded and supported by for-profit businesses.

    Accountability and Traceability are the future – As we’ve been seeing with the many Blockchain projects that have been developed in the last few years – going from cryptocurrencies like HoryouToken with its Proof of Impact to Smart Contracts that bring transparency to documents – traceability is key and, luckily, more accessible than ever. The future lies in trustworthy information, as consumers want to know more about the supply chain of their food, clothes, medicines…

    Don’t be afraid of Artificial Intelligence – One of the most awaited events of the MWC was a live medical procedure – a live surgery performed by a surgeon on the stage of MWC, while the patient was at the Hospital Clinic in Barcelona. The new technologies will allow exchanges that were almost impossible in the past, due to geographic barriers, distances and broadband limitations.

    Internet of Bodies and Biohacking – I witnessed, shocked, a volunteer had a chip implanted in his own hand, live on stage. It now allows him to make payments or open doors with his ‘intra-device’, but the possibilities of the biohacking technology go far beyond that. It can help disabled people to be less dependent on carers, for example, and has a huge potential in developing solutions for dementia patients.

    The Industry of Care – As populations are becoming long-lived in many countries, the industry of care has brought promising technological solutions. From apps that connect healthcare workers with families, providing traceable and monitored care to non-invasive procedures for chronic patients that use wearable devices to prevent hospitalizations, there is a range of affordable MedTech solutions that were developed by successful, social-good-oriented startups.

    Do you want to share your social innovation solution with the world? Horyou, the social network for social good, is the perfect platform to do so. Be the change, be Horyou.

    More Stories

    Venture capital is looking more into your company’s sustainability performance Sustainability in general, and The UN Sustainable Development Goals in particular, make for good business....