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From a small violation to a big war, all citizens are affected by law and justice – or the lack of them. Living in peace is a human right, and our society needs to make it a reality for all.

Photo: UNDP

It doesn’t matter if it is domestic violence or international conflict. We’ve all been directly or indirectly impacted by the lack of peace and justice in the world. When we see a war refugee begging for money in a big city, when a friend is victim of a robbery in the street or when we buy clothes made by slave-labor, we feel both affected and responsible.

Reaching the SDG 16 is one of the most complex challenges of our times, as everywhere it depends on strong institutions, economic development and social justice. According to the UNDP, despite the fact that crimes like homicides and human trafficking have declined in the recent years, violent conflicts have nevertheless increased. Violence against children still persists, as many suffer from psychological aggression and physical punishment on a regular basis in 76 countries. Corruption and bribes are challenges, especially in developing countries.

Change must come from a concerted multi-stakeholders strategy that requires action and commitment from governments, non-profit organization and institutions, as well as civil society. On the Horyou platform, many organizations are engaged in actions for social justice and fairness in their communities. NGOs like Association Amis pour la Justice, based in Cameroon, work for educating and raising awareness of their rights and duties in their communities. A new organization on our platform, AMIS is very active and committed to ‘translating’ human rights to people who struggle to access and understand their own value as citizens. Another organization is Society for Academic Development, a Serbian group of young people who aim to develop education and volunteerism, as well as helping refugees and other vulnerable groups.

Horyou has constantly supported and fostered the importance of peace and justice in the events that it organizes, especially SIGEF, whereby panelists and organizations have the opportunity to showcase projects and strategies to promote this SDG.

If you wish to support this SDG, you can do so through Horyou. Go to Horyou platform and choose an NGO or project that supports peace and social justice in your region or anywhere in the world. You can also show your support by participating in #HoryouLightChallenge! Be the change, be Horyou!

The Light Challenge

 

Support the SDGs!
Take the #HoryouLightChallenge

This world is the one thing we all have in common! By working together, we can achieve great good things for the future of humanity. Change for social good, however, is an everyday endeavor and it starts with you and us to inspire others around us.

To put this idea into practice, Horyou has decided to set up the #HoryouLightChallenge for all changemakers, in support of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals!

As a proponent of the SDGs, our Horyou community believes in the power of positivity and is constantly spreading positive actions and ideas worldwide; and by ensuring international cooperation and inclu- sion, it directly promotes SDG#17.

Be a part of this global partnership and take our #HoryouLightChallenge. All you have to do is choose one SDG, support it with a positive action (see examples below), and share it on Horyou.

Together, we can show the world that every expression of positivity, no matter how big or small, has a great positive impact. Each one of us, in our own way, can be a light within our own community and be- yond. Share your light with the ones around you and the SDGs will be met.

To take the challenge and have a chance to win an all inclusive trip to Singapore and participate in SIGEF18 (or one of our many other prizes*), we invite you to use your creativity and share your social good actions with Horyou.

#HoryouLightChallenge Instructions

  • Create an account on www.horyou.com
  • Create your Horyou Light Challenge post (photo, video or text) on the platform with the one SDG that you have selected among the 17 SDG examples. You can also create your own positive challenge and post it!
  • Share your Horyou post via Twitter, Facebook or any other Social Media with the #HoryouLightChallenge hashtag, along with the hashtag of the SDG that you have supported (ex: #SDG7)
  • Invite your friends to light (watch how lights work here) your post on Horyou
  • Try to get the largest number of lights and win a trip to SIGEF18 Singapore!

17 SDGs challenge examples

Make a contribution to a charity of your choice or directly to a person in need
Prepare your favorite dish for someone who can’t afford to have it
Share a healthy food recipe
Educate / share your educational sources on a topic you’re passionate about
Share an inspiring speech from someone defending gender equality
Share the ways in which you can reduce water waste in your community
Tell us about your favorite source of renewable energy and how it supports sustainable development
Share with us how your job or dream job contributes to sustainable economic growth
Tell us which innovative idea you would invest in
Tell us about the most inspiring action you’ve done to help others
Use your bike or public transport to go to work
Share tips on package free/ second hand/ fair trade and ethic shopping
Sort out your waste for recycling
Pick up the trash on your favorite beach/ lake/ river
Plant a tree
Tell us about your favorite figure promoting peace and justice and post one of his/her inspiring quotes
Share your challenge on the Horyou platform and light your favorite posts

Are you up to the challenge? Go ahead, pick your SDG, engage your friends and be a special guest on the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum in Singapore.

Take the challenge!
Be the change, be Horyou

*Prizes

All Inclusive (flight + hotel) 3 days Trip to Singapore and a free ticket to participate in the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum (SIGEF 2018) + T-shirt and Bag
A free ticket to participate in the SIGEF 2018 +100 Spotlights + Ambassador opportunity + T-shirt and Bag
…30 Horyou Bags and T-shirts for the 30 remaining most lighted posts
The challenge will be running until June 18th 2018

 

Organized by UNDP, the Social Good Summit will have guests and artists from all over the world to promote a message of justice

Social Good Summit 2017
Social Good Summit 2017

Held annually during the United Nations General Assembly week, the Social Good Summit focuses on the challenges of the 2030s. With its art installations, musical performances and conferences, the Summit will take place in New York on the 17th of September, and will adjoin a Geneva chapter, on October 13th, of which Horyou, the social network for social good, is media partner.

In a rapidly changing world, the New York Summit will contemplate the future via a dynamic exploration of life by 2030, exploring ways and means to unlock the potential of technology in order to make the world a better place.

Famous personalities, including The Color Purple’s actress Cynthis Erivo and Game of Thrones’ actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, are on the list of confirmed guests. An Emmy, Grammy and Tony awards-winning actress and singer, Erivo has been outspoken about the power of using your name and reputation to promote racial and social justice causes. Best known as a member of the villainous Lannister family in Game of Thrones, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau is a UNDP Goodwill Ambassador for gender equality and climate change.

The two personalities will be joined on stage by a host of activists to introduce innovative solutions to global issues, that includes:

ElsaMarie D’Silva, CEO & Founder of Safecity

Rocky Duwani, Singer-Songwriter

Ronald de Jong, Executive Vice President at Philips & Chairman of the Philips Foundation

Erika Ender, Singer-Songwriter

Filippo Grandi, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

Kate Hampton, CEO of the Children Investment Fund Foundation

Munira Khalif, United Nations U.S. Youth Observer

Rina Kupferschmid-Rojas, Head of Sustainable Finance at UBS & Society

Rachel Kyte, CEO & Special Representative of the UN Secretary for Sustainable Energy for All

Dr. Rebecca Martin, Director of the Center for Global Health (CGH) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Peter Maurer, President of the International Committee of the Red Cross

David Miliband, President & CEO of the International Rescue Committee

Lawrence O’Donnell, Anchor of MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Juliana Rotich, Co-Founder of BRCK & Ushahidi

Martha Isabel “Pati” Ruiz Corzo, Director of Grupo Ecológico Sierra Gorda I.A.P.

Horyou and the Social Good Summit Geneva

Horyou is media partner of SGSGeneva 2017, a closed door event targeting high level decision makers and impact finance, entrepreneurs, governments, international organizations and large private sector companies. It will be marked by networking sessions and discussions that should take the SDGs to a higher level. It will be hosted in Geneva, an important hub for sustainable finance.

More information about the Social Good Summit in New York on http://mashable.com/sgs/

The Social Good Summit in Geneva http://www.europe.undp.org/content/geneva/en/home/ourwork/social-good-summit.html

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. Horyou is also the host of SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, taking place in Astana, Kazakhstan during the EXPO 2017, from 5-7 September. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Launched by the United Nations Development Program, Foundation Center, and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors in 2014, the SDG Philanthropy Platform aims to raise awareness and build connections within the philanthropy sector. Focused on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the “SDG Funders” have developed partnerships to increase funding and create programs in order to reach the Global Development Agenda. Our Horyou community shares the same values, therefore we are happy to feature their interview in our blog!

Promoting SDGs in Brazil
Promoting SDGs in Brazil

What is the scope of SDG Funders work?

The goals of the SDG Philanthropy Platform (“the Platform”) is twofold: 1) To provide a greater understanding by the philanthropy sector of the Sustainable Development Goals (“SDG”) agenda and the process and 2) To provide a greater understanding by the UN system, governments, private sector and civil society of the role and potential of the philanthropy sector to contribute to sustainable development. After launching the Platform in Kenya, Ghana, Zambia, Colombia, Indonesia, India, Brazil, and the United States, we have recognized our role in creating partnerships that result in effective programs that help countries achieve the SDGs. The Platform is working to improve the philanthropic sector by providing country-specific information more easily, mapping the ecosystem, and sharing data so that giving is more transparent and less fragmented.

Teamwork in Ghana
Teamwork in Ghana

As a social entrepreneurship supporter and accelerator, what would you say are the biggest challenges to be a social entrepreneur?

I believe the biggest challenges for a social entrepreneur is access – access to funding, networks, resources, mentorship, etc. The SDGs is a classification system that is understood globally and is increasingly being used by all stakeholders. When social entrepreneurs frame their work using this taxonomy, it is an opportunity to leverage more resources. Through the open-source information we provide on our website, social entrepreneurs are able to better understand the ecosystem in which they operate and learn who are the top funders and recipients related to a specific SDG and country.

How do you see the future of social entrepreneurship?

In order to achieve the SDGs and their respective targets by 2030, neither the government nor philanthropy can do it alone. We will need the support of innovative thinkers, social entrepreneurs, and corporations to all work together to achieve the SDGs. In this, social entrepreneurs will continue to be valuable in scaling solutions and deepening their impact.

Event in Indonesia
Event in Indonesia

Horyou connects on its social platform thousands of social entrepreneurs, philanthropists and organizations around the world. In your opinion, what’s the importance of social networks for social entrepreneurship and, particularly, for your work?

Collaboration. Around the world, social entrepreneurs, philanthropists and organizations are creating solutions to tackle issues. By participating in social networks, stakeholders can learn from each other, share their approaches, and discuss how to create meaningful impact. Collaborative networks reduce duplicative efforts and help better utilize resources, both monetary and non-monetary. The Platform is a vehicle for catalyzing multi-stakeholder partnerships and collaboration to advance SDGs through building awareness and connections between those working in the philanthropy sector and beyond. The Platform has adopted a systemic approach to funding and policy work, shifting from fragmented individual projects to long-term collaborative efforts in line with national development priorities and the SDGs.

Horyou is the Social Network for Social Good, which connects, supports and promotes social initiatives, entrepreneurs, and citizens who help the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals to build a more harmonious and inclusive world. We invite you to Be the Change, Be Horyou!

Flagship report “UNDP and Climate Change: Scaling up Climate Action to Achieve the SDGs"
Flagship report “UNDP and Climate Change: Scaling up Climate Action to Achieve the SDGs”

A new UNDP document launched during the COP 22, in Marrakech, links climate action with sustainable development. The flagship report “UNDP and Climate Change: Scaling up Climate Action to Achieve the SDGs” is in its second edition and highlights local initiatives relating to climate change mitigation and adaptation.

“The report showcases how each of the actions taken to address climate change has profound and concrete results that benefit human, social and economic development”, said UN Assistant Secretary General and UNDP Assistant Administrator Magdy Martinez-Soliman. The UNDP document looks at efforts that empower communities in all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including education, healthcare, food security and women empowerment. By using country examples, the document illustrates with infographics and stories how the more than 800 UNDP programmes are contributing to achieve the 17 SDGs.

Examples abound: In Ecuador, the Zero Hunger initiative whereby farmers are increasing their water supply access by reviving traditional water control and combining small dams and dikes with modern reservoirs and irrigation techniques, is a fine one. Samoa, where youth and women are supported by educational programmes to start micro-enterprises in agro-businesses is another.

The UNDP impact reached more than 140 countries through access climate grant finance, providing a 2.8 USD billion portfolio. Almost 40% of the portfolio on adaptation efforts, while 22% are linked to forestation projects and mitigation actions for sustainable energy. 11% support issues like institutional strengthening, finance and capacity building, and nearly 11% help countries to achieve the targets of the Paris Agreement.   “Thanks to the Paris Agreement, we now have a path for the world to work together on an integrated solution to climate change,” said Martinez-Soliman. “It is now our responsibility to work with our partners to follow this path and to help achieve climate and development priorities.”

The report reiterates the COP 22 message for the climate – the deal is done; the time to act is now.

Written by Vivian Soares

The Sustainable Development Goals are admirable and necessary –still, they are more an agenda than a set of concrete policies. In a new report, the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRIDS) shares examples of strategies and real policies to achieve the global objectives by 2030.

Policy Innovations for Transformative Change was launched on October 17th
Policy Innovations for Transformative Change was launched on October 17th

Launched on the International Day for Eradication of Poverty, October 17, Walking the Talk, the UNRIDS report on Policy Innovations for Transformative Change, brought a clear message to the governments and stakeholders involved in the implementation of the SDGs, engaging them to act on turning the agenda into fact. Displaying a full range of case studies along with a research-based social policy innovation approach, the report offers sustainable development, social care and economic solidarity solutions through the lens of transformative change.

Katja Rujo, the report coordinator for UNRIDS, asserted that transformative change digs to the roots of poverty, inequality and environmental destruction and is thus more effective than simply treating their symptoms. Palliative and one-size-fits-all interventions, for instance, are not enough; innovative and eco-social policies are more effective, as long as they promote sustainable production and consumption, power re-configurations and changes in economic and social structures.

Such programs are currently implemented in Brazil and India where an integrated approach that aims to achieve both social and environmental goals has been adopted. In Brazil, for instance, a program established in 2011 provides financial incentives to families that make a living out of collected forest products in return for a commitment to adopt a sustainable use of natural resources. In India, again, the law guarantees at least 100 days of paid employment each year for every rural household that focuses on water security, soil conservation and higher land productivity.

Cu-c-17XEAAc3Hi.jpg-large

On the care system side, the Uruguayan program Sistema Nacional de Cuidado enrolls young children and adults with specific needs or disabilities in the solidarity system, providing them with a minimum life quality standards. The program is a result of a broad political mobilization which includes social movements, women legislators and academics.

Isabel Ortiz, Director of the Social Protection Department with the International Labour Organization (ILO), pointed out that transformative change is a policy that reflects a new paradigm formed in the early 2000s in line with the SDGs. “It is the concept that social, economic and environmental issues are integrated, and that we should create policies and safety networks for everybody, not only the poor”, she explained.

The United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRIDS) shares examples of real policies to achieve the SDGs
The United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRIDS) shares examples of real policies to achieve the SDGs

The six keys areas mapped by the report are social policy, care, climate change, domestic resource mobilization, governance and social and solidarity economy. This multidisciplinary approach opens the gates to solutions in all 17 Sustainable Development Goals. It requires, however, a commitment from all actors on local, national, regional and global levels. “In 2016, 132 countries are cutting their budgets – not only in rich Europe but in many developing countries. How to implement SDGs in this scenario?”, asks Isabel. The answer might lie in innovation and efficiency – and research plays a vital role in this equation.

Written by Vivian Soares

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Support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals! This world is the one thing we all have in common! By working together, we can achieve great...