The Sustainable Development Agenda of the United Nations for 2030 has been staging since 2015 a series of goals to guide the world on the path of sustainability with the aim of eradicating poverty, improving living conditions and take immediate action in the conservation of the environment. Thus, each of the 17 SDGs support and promote a specific field that private, public and civil sectors are committed to empower and represent.

SDGs


The scope of these objectives reflects not only an advance in the development of each country or region of the world, but also demonstrates the synergies and international cooperation willing to act for the social good. But how can you contribute individually to these initiatives?

Here are a few tips:

1. Support them in social networks
Social networks like Horyou allow you to share projects and actions related to the scope of some sustainable development objective and allow other international organizations to help you achieve your goals, either through funding or promoting visibility.

2. Improve your visibility
Always use #SDG (as well as #ODD, #ODS, or other hashtag, depending on your language of choice) in any publication on social media, so that the support you give to a certain cause or project is visible. Thus, it will be easier to find people supporting the same objective and the probability of achieving future connections will be greater.

3. Join new challenges
Lose the fear and support new initiatives like the #HoryouLightChallenge whereby you can share your positive actions in favor of sustainable development as well as in your daily routine.


4. Turn your passion into help

Inspire your friends


Identify which of the sustainable development objectives is aligned more with your routines, habits and work and share innovative ways to contribute to solutions aimed at the proposed goals.

5. Be an ambassador for your goal of preference
Share with your community and inspire your circle of friends to support Sustainable Development Goals through their daily routines.

In this way, every one of us can contribute a bit to the global agenda of sustainable development and have by 2030 a healthier planet and better living conditions for us and future generations.

 

 

Written by Sueyfer de la Torre

 

Through time, the meaning of philanthropy has evolved from loving people to allocating private resources that help them tackle the challenges of an improved quality of life. Since the 1930s, philanthropy has continued to evolve through to the mid-twentieth century, in resonance with the major events of the period. Donors around the world are more aware of the challenges that different communities are facing every day.

Source: CNBC

While still remaining true to the memory of the great past practices, philanthropy today is more organized, professional, and global than ever before. Philanthropists work to improve and strengthen communities, support the arts, build schools and raise educational standards, combat epidemics, and provide relief to the victims of war and natural disasters; and they do so in a variety of ways. Individuals make donations and volunteer action. Neighborhood organizations take on local and global projects. Foundations support cutting-edge research. Corporations give back to their communities.

In Asia, the state of Singapore has been a benchmark for philanthropy initiatives for which many of its foundations have helped to develop a thriving environment, finding new ways to reach to people in need and, moreover, empower them to speak out for themselves and pursue the Sustainable Development Goals. Let’s have a look at the philanthropy foundations advancing these challenges in Singapore.

#SDG4 – Philanthropy advancing quality education: The Lien Foundation

The Lien Foundation was founded by Dr. Lien Ying Chow whose passion for education and commitment to the community led him to donate almost half of his wealth to help the deprived. The foundation supports and advocates early childhood education and elder care in Singapore, as well as access to clean water & sanitation in developing countries.

#SDG 3 and #SDG4 – Philanthropy advancing quality education and well-being: The Lee Foundation

One of Singapore’s oldest philanthropy institutions, the Lee Foundation, was founded by business tycoon Lee Kong Chian in 1952. A family foundation, it has since given nearly USD$1 billion charity, with tens of millions given annually to almost all sectors, including education, health, welfare, and religious groups.

#SDG8 – Philanthropy advancing decent work: ACSEP

The Asia Centre for Social Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy (ACSEP) is a research centre situated within the National University of Singapore Business School. It aims to advance the understanding and impactful practice of social entrepreneurship and philanthropy throughout Asia by focusing on research and education (NUS Business School, 2016). Its goal is to be a resource and knowledge hub that connects those who have the ability and desire to do good with those in need. The center also engages in collaborative efforts with academic institutions, government agencies, corporations, non-profit organizations, and social enterprises.

#SDG17 – Philanthropy advancing partnerships for the goals: NVPC

The National Volunteer & Philanthropy Centre (NVPC) is a non-profit organization that aims to promote a culture of giving in Singapore by catalyzing development in volunteerism and philanthropy. NVPC facilitates partnerships with non-profit organizations, corporations, public sector bodies, and individuals in order to build Singapore’s giving ecosystem. NVPC also conducts research on giving motivations and behaviors, while it also creates roadmaps and landscapes of the giving sector, and aspires to be the go-to-place for giving.

The commitment and synergies that these foundations are creating towards the sustainable development goals demonstrate the progress on the oriented focus to look for new ways to help people in need by leveraging the giving networks to magnify the scope of philanthropy today. Horyou is proud to support disruptive Philanthropy through its platform, events and ever-growing community of innovators and social good doers, from Singapore to Japan, in all Asia and beyond.

Singapore is the host city for the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum (SIGEF), organized by Horyou, the social network for social good. The event will be held in September 2018.

About Horyou

Horyou connects more than 250,000 Internet users to Non-Profit Organisations, Artists, and Innovators in 180 countries. Horyou organizes international events in resonance with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, such as the Horyou Village in Cannes during the Film Festival and the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, SIGEF. Horyou recently launched Spotlight, the first global social currency supporting economic inclusion worldwide, embedded into the social network. Horyou aims to connect CSR and innovative companies to its diverse community of change-makers worldwide.

Written by Sueyfer de la Torre

 

A new member of Horyou platform, the Haiti Cholera Research Funding Foundation (HCRFF) invests in education and awareness to prevent health issues in developing countries

Pierrette Cazeau

Despite being born in Haiti, Pierrette Cazeau grew up in New York and Florida, in the US, and thus was never aware of the country’s challenges until she first visited it as a grown up-woman. She was struck by the challenges faced by its population on a daily basis – lack of health infrastructure, corruption, abuse, poverty and hunger. That changed her life as she decided to devote her time and efforts to build a Foundation and use education to prevent such disasters as the 2010 cholera outbreak.

«You can’t predict natural disasters or climate change effects, but you can educate people to prevent and reduce poverty. Without education, you just open the door to the negative effects of the unpredictable», says Pierrette, founder of HCRFF. The NGO was created in 2013 and has since developed many projects to support and empower communities facing health and social problems. «We’ve seen so many victimized people sitting quietly, and that escalates anger and hate». Economic and social problems, she believes, are part of a cycle that comprises disruption, refugee crisis and racism.

Syphilis Project

Focusing on education, the foundation organizes workshops for students coming from challenging backgrounds. In addition to preparing them for work via professional education, and providing them with food, HCRFF also raises awareness of topics like HIV prevention (PrEP and PEP), sexual abuse and other sensitive topics that are critical for the new generations. The NGO also helps Haitians to get access to health care in the US by providing them with transportation, shelter, advocacy and even translation services whenever needed. It also supports pregnant Haitian women left behind by UN peacekeeping soldiers.

The next step is to expand the Foundation services to other countries including Ghana, in Africa, where it intends to start an education campaign on HIV and other STDs. «We need more sponsors as we never charge anything for the services we provide to the communities», says Pierrette. For the last three years, the NGO has been funded by partners, but new sources of financial support are needed. One of the plans is to organize a Marathon for People Living with HIV and raise funds for the cause of education for prevention. «One thing I’ve learned from my father is that education can’t be taken from you. It stays with you forever. I’m grateful for all the educational opportunities I’ve had and I wish more people keep benefitting from it as well».

L’organisation Adelarte travaille pour l’autosuffisance et l’éducation des communautés vulnérables en Colombie. Particulièrement active sur les éthnies indigènes, Adelarte dévéloppe, en partenariat avec les communautés locales, des solutions durables et soutenables, en utilisant l’art et la culture. Interview avec la présidente Marline Fayollet.

Elèves du Centro Etnoeducativo Numero Doce de La Guajira, dans la communauté de Muurai, Colombie

Racontez-nous un peu sur votre histoire et vos principaux projets.

Fondée en février 2017, Adelarte a pour objet de construire, au travers de l’art, des solutions locales, durables et soutenables pour faire face aux enjeux sociétaux mondiaux. Nous constituons des équipes multidisciplinaires de volontaires internationaux qui exécutent des missions de développement durable avec des communautés vulnérables en utilisant l’art comme vecteur de changement. Durant l’année 2017, en coopération avec des associations colombiennes et selon les priorités identifiées par les communautés wayuu bénéficiaires, nous avons monté un projet ayant pour but d’offrir de meilleures conditions d’éducation, d’augmenter les possibilités d’autosuffisance, de contribuer au maintien de la culture wayuu et de permettre le développement personnel de chacun, qu’il soit wayuu ou volontaire.

Quelle est la situation actuelle des communautés wayuu et de quel type de support ont-elles besoin ?

Les communautés identifiées en 2017 sont celles de Loma Fresca 2 et Muurai. Elles appartiennent à l’éthnie Wayuu dont l’organisation est matrilinéaire et vivent d’une économie mixte basée sur l’élevage et le pâturage caprin, le maraîchage, l’artisanat et la pêche. Les wayuu vivent dans la péninsule de La Guajira, l’une des plus pauvres de Colombie. C’est une région sèche et aride, presque uniquement recouverte de sable, constamment balayée par les alizées marins et connaissant une longue période de sécheresse qui a tendance à s’accentuer avec le phénomène El Niño. La végétation y est très pauvre, l’accès à l’eau potable compliqué et la corruption qui y fait rage a rongé, entre autre, le système éducatif. A Muurai, pour que les enfants puissent étudier dans de bonnes conditions, il manque des salles de classe, des toilettes, des cantines équipées, mais aussi de l’eau potable pour s’hydrater et de l’électricité.

Pourquoi favorisez-vous l’éducation artistique et culturelle ?

L’association mise sur l’art pour aller de l’avant, d’où son nom Adelarte une contraction de Adelante con el arte (En avant avec l’art). En effet, l’art n’a pas de frontières et offre un terrain de dialogue qui dépasse les limites du langage. Il est capteur d’attention et facilitateur d’implication. C’est un vecteur d’expérimentation collective et de développement personnel qui stimule l’estime de soi. Nous utilisons la musique et la peinture pour motiver les membres des communautés à s’impliquer lors des activités de construction. Nous montons également une pièce de théâtre basée sur les contes ancestraux et animons la radio étudiante de notre partenaire dans le but de valoriser les cultures, donner envie aux futures générations de s’exprimer dans leur langue, ainsi qu’en espagnol, et de leur donner confiance.

Êtes-vous engagés pour les Objectifs de Dévéloppement Durable de l’ONU? Lesquels?

Nous nous engageons sur plusieurs objectifs, notamment les 4, 6, 7, 10 et 17.

Adelarte est un nouveau membre de notre communauté. Partagez vos espoirs et vos plans avec Horyou !

Nous souhaitons pouvoir donner envie à la communauté d’Horyou de s’impliquer de manière plus ou moins directe dans nos projets. Partager nos bonnes pratiques ainsi que notre retour d’expérience sur ce type de projet.

SDG#6 is an inspiration for Water Energy and Sanitation for Development (WESDE), an active member of our Horyou community. With the aim to fill the gap left by civil society organizations in terms of Health and Environment Education and Integrated Water Resources Management in Cameroon, WESDE faces security, infrastructure and funding challenges to bring development to urban and rural populations in the far North region of the country. Interview with Marie Louise Kongne, WESDE National Coordinator.

WESDE team acting in Cameroon

What are WESDE’s main goals?

While improving significantly the sanitation, hygiene and housing conditions of disadvantaged populations, we aim to reduce the percentage of the population that does not have sustainable access to a drinking water supply. We also want to train and educate people to sustainable management of water resources and the protection of the environment, trying to reverse the current trend of loss of environmental resources. In order to do so, we seek to cooperate with national and international organizations, develop and maintain partnership, exchange and learning relationships. Last but not least, one of our objectives is to accompany the community in the fight against HIV / AIDS in order to stop its spread and reverse the current trend.

Tell us about your main achievements in 2017 and your plans for 2018

In 2017, we helped to raise awareness on education and training of 125 community health workers to work closely with families in 9 health areas on 12 main themes. In total, more than 43,000 households were visited. We also had an active participation in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) coordination meetings of the far North region under the co-lead of UNICEF and the far North Regional Delegation of Water and Energy and, as a Partner of Global Water Partnership (GWP) Central Africa, we contributed to the WASH resilience project in the Mayo Tsanaga sub-basin. In 2018, we aim to implement the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach in 150 villages of 3 pilot health areas as part of the support of the government to improve sanitation conditions in rural areas.

What main challenges do you face in your work?

We have no appropriate vehicles, as we need 4X4 vehicles to reach many areas. The self-financing mechanism is still very weak and there is not a long-term program, which could be at least 3-year renewable. Also, we develop our activities in a context of high insecurity (by Boko Haram)

Your work is closely connected with the SDG#6. In your point of view, how important is it to have a global agenda for water and sanitation?

In comparison with Drinking Water Supply, sanitation has often fallen behind government and donor concerns; however, this situation is moving in the right direction as sectorial strategies are increasingly putting sanitation at the top of the agenda. Recent studies have shown the importance of sanitation for improving health, promoting social development and protecting the environment. It has also been shown that Sanitation interventions are particularly effective in terms of cost reduction if we judge the increase in productivity that they induce and the decrease in the diseases and deaths that they allow. With this in mind, in the framework of the International Year of Sanitation (AIA) by the United Nations in 2008, the African continent, with the support of the African Ministerial Council for Water and Sanitation (AWCOW) organized the AfricaSan conference in Durban in 2008. This regional conference culminated in the ambitious eThekwini ministerial statement, stressing the importance of leadership in sanitation and recommending that 0.5% of GDP must be spent on sanitation.

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