Focused on 3 Sustainable Development Goals, the Future Here Summit invited social good doers, innovators and artists to re-imagine a new Renaissance – one involving technology.

Horyou team presenting the social network for social good to the Future Here Summit audience. Image Credits to Anna Rosa Paladino for TIAC Academy.

Let’s fast forward and think of a world without inequalities, where innovation is a core element in all enterprises and society is built on partnerships for good. This is not Utopia – all the aforementioned scenarios actually come under three of seventeen United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

The 3 SDGs – Reduced Inequalities; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure and Partnership to Achieve the Goals – , were the main focus of the Future Here Summit, an event focused on re-imagining the next generations from a ‘Renaissance’ viewpoint. Unsurprisingly, Florence, birthplace of the eponymous artistic avant-garde movement, was the venue. While addressing issues including Augmented Intelligence, Energy, Nature, Sustainable Development and Education, the event had both on-site and virtual panels and sessions, whereby artists, entrepreneurs, visionaries and academics were invited to exchange ideas and expectations for the future.

Horyou, the social network for social good, contributed to one of the sessions with an inspiring presentation of its role in empowering change-makers. Speaking for Horyou, Sueyfer Velásquez, Social Media and Partnerships Manager, introduced the network to a diverse and curious audience. «It’s a very powerful experience to share our vision for a better world in the birthplace of Renaissance», she said. Seizing the opportunity, Sueyfer went on to introduce HoryouToken, the first digital currency for economic inclusion and advancement of the SDGs, along with HoryouTV and SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, which will take place on 18-19 September, in Tokyo, Japan.

In addition to the conferences, the Future Here Summit incorporated Orbit, a dedicated incubator for the development of «experiential wisdom tools and businesses» where art, science and businesses were welcome to help promote inclusive growth.

The Japanese Capital supports startups, public policies and innovative ideas to help solve the transportation challenge

Each day, 20 million commuters leave their houses to go to work in one of the trains of Tokyo’s metropolitan area. The figure is impressive, and it represents only a part of the challenge that the city, which is home to more than 13 million people, is facing. Yet, Tokyo also has one of the most efficient and innovative transportation systems in the world, which places it in the smart cities’ Olympus.

Thus not surprisingly, Tokyo will be hosting the Summer Olympic Games next year, and the Japanese authorities are making important efforts to improve intramuros mobility. Since planning is key, a few years ago the government started to stimulate and support innovative projects which would bring greener and smarter solutions to that particular challenge.

The results are already showing: projects like “Condition-Based Maintenance” use Internet of Things (IoT) technology to collect and analyze data pertaining to the Yamanote Line, one of the busiest train rings in Tokyo, in order to forecast failures and identify weaknesses, and hence to reduce the need for maintenance closures. The city has also set a bold objective in terms of the environmental impact of its transportation system: bring down carbon dioxide emissions to 25 percent by next year.

The entrepreneurial landscape is also bustling in Tokyo, as projects like autonomous driving, transportation apps and shared mobility start to flourish. Even private companies from traditional industries like Mori, an urban developer based in Tokyo, are investing in on-demand transit technologies for its employees. By using a mobile app which calculates and optimizes commuting routes, they can share cars and give rides.

A recent McKinsey report has calculated that the taxi market alone accounts for more than USD$17 billion, which has attracted companies like Uber but also caught the attention of other investors. Last year, the city’s first autonomous taxi was launched as a pilot project, which is intended to be fully operative during the Olympic Games. Financed by the metropolitan government, the project is projected to be affordable and safe with sensor-equipped vehicles that operate in full autonomy while a driver is at the wheel to attend to emergencies.

Smart transportation is one of the major investments in Japan, as the country faces a series of demographic and economic shifts, requiring new solutions and regulations. Air mobility is another one. Japan is an insulated country with restricted land mobility. Via its Future 2018 Investment Strategy, the Japanese government has set up a roadmap for the development of flying vehicles, which has already attracted several startups and innovative minds.

Are you interested in Smart Technology, Mobility and Smart Cities? Register for SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, which will be held in Tokyo on 18-19 September 2019. Experts, officials and entrepreneurs from all over the world will discuss new trends in transportation and disruptive technologies for the future of our cities.

Tokyo will host the next SIGEF as it plans to become an example of sustainability by 2020

Tokyo is the host city of the 6th edition of SIGEF

Tokyo wants to set a good example for the world. As it braces to host the 2019’s edition of SIGEF, the Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum, the city is aiming to reach the highest standards of sustainability by 2020, when it will also host the Olympic and Paralympic Games. With its ‘Be Better Together – For the Planet and For the People’ slogan, Tokyo is indeed committed to develop sustainable solutions and showcase them to the world.

The Olympics are not the only reason the city is heavily investing in sustainability. 2020 is indeed the final date for a 7-year plan whereby the Japanese government aims to make Tokyo the ‘world’s most environmentally-friendly low-carbon city’. Part of the transformation includes the revitalization of the urban area while surrounding the city with water and greenery.

The initiatives are broad and they resonate with the UN Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to promoting ideas like zero waste and reducing carbon consumption, the city shall otherwise rely on technology to make the 2020 Games a landmark in sustainable management. One of the projects includes fuel cell vehicles and renewable energy (see image). The city wants to equalize the greenhouse gas emissions by stimulating public transportation, reusing water and recycling not only waste but also buildings – the plan includes using existing venues and avoiding building new ones.

These are some of 2020 Tokyo Olympics goals

The 2020 plan also includes:

– Creating more than 500 hectares of new green space in the city

– Ending free distribution of plastic shopping bags

– Equipping metro facilities with 100% LED lighting

– Using recycled metal for the production of all the medals for the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo Medal Project)

– Equipping the Olympic stadium with solar-power and a rainwater retention system.

In order to promote so many changes in such a short time, the Japanese government is seeking partnerships with other countries, especially regarding public transportation, air pollution and waste management. Last year, the city hosted the Tokyo Forum for Clean City and Clean Air, gathering representatives from 22 cities around the world which shared their experiences in smart and sustainable management. Next September, Tokyo will host the 6th edition of SIGEF, the most important Social Innovation and Global Ethics forum in the world, organized by Horyou and covering the following topics:

  • Artificial Intelligence for Positive Change
  • Fintech and Blockchain
  • Sustainable Lifestyles
  • Technology and Life Extension
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • Renewable and Future Energy

Over the next few weeks, Horyou blog will showcase all the initiatives that are being developed by the Japanese government to transform its capital – and the whole country – into an innovative, sustainable and peaceful society, inspired by the UN Sustainable Development Goals. 

On International Women’s Day, Horyou pays a tribute to the women members of our community running non-profit organizations and social good projects around the world

Think about an organization you know – be it a big NGO or a small neighbourhood project -, and you’ll surely single out a woman in charge of some of its most important tasks. According to a study of the White House Project, unlike almost all other industries and job positions in many a country whereby gender gap is the rule, in the non-profit sector women represent around 75% of all workforce (including volunteers).

Our Horyou community is mere testimony of its many women members engagement and how they strive to make the world a better place. Here are just a few examples:

Maria Guzmán

Maria Guzman, Fundación Somos VidaCreated in 2012, this non-profit organization is based in Venezuela with the main project to support children with cancer while providing them with psychological support and the much-needed treatment. The foundation also plays an important role in promoting fundamental human rights through consulting and assessment. María is a frequent international speaker, including SIGEF, and a true social good promoter.

Souad Dibi, Association Féminine de Bienfaisance El-Khir

Souad Dibi

Based in Morocco, the association provides legal and educational support to women and children. Their main goal is to improve their condition, empowering and helping them out of their vulnerable conditions to achieve economic integration and promote cultural exchanges. Souad Dibi was a panelist on Women Empowerment at SIGEF 2016 which took place in Marrakesh,.

Pierrette Cazeau, Haiti Cholera Research Foundation

Pierrette Cazeau

This NGO was founded in 2013 and is an active member of the Horyou community. Pierrette has developed many projects to support and empower communities facing health and social problems in her home country Haiti, through HIV prevention programs for youth, and health care support and information on sensitive topics including sexual abuse. Pierrette plans to extend the NGO actions to other countries, namely to Ghana, Africa.

Marie Louise Kongne, Water Energy and Sanitation for Development The Cameroonese NGO has developed a remarkable work among people without access to sustainable drinking water supply. Marie Louise leads a committed team of workers who educate the population in the rural areas of North Cameroon in such issues as sustainable management of water resources. The organization also promotes training to health workers in Cameroon,

Silvana Andrade, ANDA

Silvana Andrade

Silvana is the president of ANDA, the largest Brazilian news agency for animal rights. A fierce and committed member of our Horyou community, she and her team have helped to raise awareness of traditional media in the past 10 years, along with advocating for causes including the end of rodeo shows and changing pet transportation policies in airlines.

There are many other social entrepreneurs and social good doers among our members, personalities and organizations. Pick your favorite causes and connect for good with them on Horyou. Be the change, be Horyou!

The Mobile World Congress (MWC) and its side event 4YFN, have some successful experiences to share with the social good sector

The Mobile World Congress took place from 25-28 February, 2019

Until a few years ago, the social good world was considered as a unique entity, completely separated from the regular businesses. Although it had common goals with the public sector, it was then clear that the ‘charitables’ or ‘non-profits’ shared few traits with the for-profit industries. The good news is, these times are over. Last week, as I dug in two most disruptive conferences, the MWC and 4YFN, I learned not only that social businesses have never been more interesting to the tech industries, but that they have many lessons to learn about them. Here are some the tech industry takeaways for social entrepreneurs:

They want to invest in social businesses – Regardless of industry, many big corporations have substantial open innovation budgets to invest in startups that bring positive change in their businesses. Clean energy, sustainable mobility, simplified and accessible payment projects, affordable healthcare, all of these are examples of areas that are in the radar of big companies. There was never a better time for social businesses to be funded and supported by for-profit businesses.

Accountability and Traceability are the future – As we’ve been seeing with the many Blockchain projects that have been developed in the last few years – going from cryptocurrencies like HoryouToken with its Proof of Impact to Smart Contracts that bring transparency to documents – traceability is key and, luckily, more accessible than ever. The future lies in trustworthy information, as consumers want to know more about the supply chain of their food, clothes, medicines…

Don’t be afraid of Artificial Intelligence – One of the most awaited events of the MWC was a live medical procedure – a live surgery performed by a surgeon on the stage of MWC, while the patient was at the Hospital Clinic in Barcelona. The new technologies will allow exchanges that were almost impossible in the past, due to geographic barriers, distances and broadband limitations.

Internet of Bodies and Biohacking – I witnessed, shocked, a volunteer had a chip implanted in his own hand, live on stage. It now allows him to make payments or open doors with his ‘intra-device’, but the possibilities of the biohacking technology go far beyond that. It can help disabled people to be less dependent on carers, for example, and has a huge potential in developing solutions for dementia patients.

The Industry of Care – As populations are becoming long-lived in many countries, the industry of care has brought promising technological solutions. From apps that connect healthcare workers with families, providing traceable and monitored care to non-invasive procedures for chronic patients that use wearable devices to prevent hospitalizations, there is a range of affordable MedTech solutions that were developed by successful, social-good-oriented startups.

Do you want to share your social innovation solution with the world? Horyou, the social network for social good, is the perfect platform to do so. Be the change, be Horyou.

A new movement seeks to convene entrepreneurs for a sustainable 21st century

Oxygen2050 conference takes place in Helsinki

Exactly how would you imagine the world in 30 years? At the pace technology is advancing, the world as we know it is bound to transform completely. But will it cope with the current challenges our society is faced with?

A global group of entrepreneurs believe they can offer some answers to those questions and, more importantly, propose solutions for the next decades. Oxygen 2050 is a grassroots movement that aspires to transform the 21st Century society through inclusion and sustainability.

Hence, on the 15th of February, the group is bringing together entrepreneurs, investors and stakeholders in Helsinki, to consider the establishment of new ventures for a new world. For that purpose, Oxygen 2050 is re-inventing the traditional conference format and proposing an alternative to panels and roundtables in the form of ‘jam sessions’ whereby everyone is invited to bring their notes. It’s called Transformative Business Unconference (TBU), and it’s got no agenda other than the main theme, embracing the idea of crowd-sourced content. Schedules aren’t immutable and may be rewritten any time, and inspiration is the rule.

Invited speaker Yonathan Parienti, founder and CEO of Horyou, the social network for social good, will elaborate on the Horyou’s mission, as well as on HoryouToken and the concept of Blockchain with a Purpose. Says Yonathan: «We are humbled to be part of this group of entrepreneurs working together and exchanging ideas for better times. Horyou is here to support the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the Agenda 2030 by sharing its experience within the ecosystem of social entrepreneurship».

It is worth noting that Oxygen 2050 gathering resonates with Horyou’s mission, which is to introduce a new approach to valuing creation. In the words of its organizers, “growth and profit are important, but motivation derives from purpose, while the challenges that the world is faced with call entrepreneurs, investors, customers and stakeholders at large to determine the mission and the purpose of their institutions”.

Keep tuned for more news from Oxygen 2050, an Horyou Media Partner.

 

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