The new generations are more afraid of the traditional financial markets and willing to bring purpose to their investments.

Impact investing: money with purpose

Once upon a time, investing was considered a sport for the wealthy. While in many countries it is still meant for the rich to get richer, most of the Western World have now opened to new innovative investment options which don’t even require a bank account, crowdfunding, growth ventures and microloan agencies being some of the best known.

Research shows that new generations are prone to saving their money, but afraid to invest in the traditional financial market. Many are considered too conservative, traumatized as they still are by the repercussions of the financial crisis. But there is something else that differentiates Millennials from the former generations.

And it is called Purpose.

A recent study published by Deloitte shows that 76% of Millennials support businesses that have a positive social impact. Another research points out that this generation considers investment as a statement of values and a tool for change. Last but not least, Millennials believe there is no tradeoff between impact and financial return. Together, these ideas form the core of Impact Investing, a concept which combines philanthropy, social entrepreneurship and profit-only traditional investment.

Businesses are aware of the trend and want to attract more investors by developing social and environmental actions and programs. It’s a matter of survival, as corporate social responsibility is not only about having a good image, but also about attracting clients who want to consume consciously. In doing so, ‘good companies’ build solid and sustainable profits and… they bring the attention of demanding, purposeful investors of all sizes. Following the trend, banks like Credit Suisse and JP Morgan are creating funds based on impact investing, and even Stock Exchanges are giving more space to these investments, as evidenced in the UK with the Social Stock Exchange (SSE).

Impact investing is also about prevention, as businesses which act responsibly have fewer problems with environmental and work lawsuits, keep their employees more motivated and productive, and thus generate better results. By polluting less, they minimize potential problems with the authorities and prevent corruption, as bribes can cost dearly.

Investors the world around are concerned with the economic, as well as the social and environmental impacts of their decisions. More and more, they want to walk the talk. Are you ready to consider to do the same?

Horyou, the social network for social good, is an advocate for Impact Investing. By launching Spotlight and, more recently, Horyou Token, Horyou is also investing in social impact alternatives for good. Join us and be the change, be Horyou!

 

WestRock paper and packaging is a giant company of sort – with a revenue of more than 14 billion USD, the company has been exhibiting good financial health in recent years. For WestRock, business sustainability is much more than a financial goal, reason why the company is constantly working with its supply chain, customers and communities located on the company’s factory site. We interviewed Cynthia Wolgien, WestRock Corporate Communications and Social Responsibility Manager in Brazil about the company’s community programs and vision for the future.

“Learning with the Tree” is a project which trains public school teachers with UN Agenda themes

(Versão em português abaixo – Portuguese version below)

– Tell us a bit about WestRock’s involvement in sustainability projects.

I have been working in the area of external communication and social responsibility for six years and at WestRock the two areas are closely linked. Sustainability has always been in our practices and, as the world has progressed, the company has evolved with it. In recent years, it started to work more thoroughly with the various dimensions of sustainability and this year will be the first to launch a sustainability report, aligned with the global report that the company launched last year. In Brazil, our company is privately held and has no obligation to file a sustainability report on investor standards. So we have the freedom to speak to other stakeholders, communities and clients in our report. What guides our work are the three pillars we call PPP: People, Planet and Performance.

– What are the regions of the country where your CSR programs are concentrated?

The vast majority of CSR actions are around the company’s units in Brazil, more specifically in Santa Catarina and Paraná Southern states, where we have our forests. With these communities we take special care, we run surveys and studies so that our social projects impact where they are needed most. But throughout the country we have at least 18 voluntary initiatives.

– Could you name one project of major relevance?

This year we are working with communities’ needs in a deep and smart way, in order to understand their needs and to know how they fit into what the company believes before implementing programs. One of the initiatives is “Learning with the Tree Project”, which is in its 23rd edition and trains public school teachers with themes that have always been related to the UN agenda. Two years ago, we launched the program with the 17 sustainable development goals, to present them more generally. Last year, we worked on goal 15 and land life, and this year we talked about water, goal 6. Approximately 200 teachers are trained each year, many of them coming from poor municipalities, without access to didactic material to implement the projects. So the company provides not only content, but also promotes debate and donates the material to the schools. Our goal is to reach out to children so they grow more aware and environmentally responsible. It is long-term, and they take this knowledge home, being agents of transformation and questioning.

– How can sustainability be good business?

Within the PPP philosophy, all these actions will give sustainability to the business over time. Performance is the financial health that, globally, is aimed at the investor. In Brazil, we think of performance as a profitable business that is sustainable to pay suppliers and reinvest in what we believe in. Our commitment goes beyond our operations – we have a code of conduct for suppliers to meet the goals of integrity, employee well-being and safety.

– What is your vision of corporate social responsibility within the company?

Our desire is to continue to be one of the companies that innovates and brings solutions to the customer but thinking from the forest point of view, passing through the paper mill and arriving in cardboard, which is our biggest business. We want to innovate in a responsible and committed way, in order to to minimize impact. In addition, we seek to involve employees, suppliers, customers and communities, to work always in a more holistic sustainability way.

Horyou, the social network for social good, supports social innovative initiatives that help the world to reach the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Horyou is the organizer of SIGEF, The Social Innovation and Global Ethics Forum. Be the Change, be Horyou!

——————————————————————————————————-

Entrevista em português

Responsabilidade social corporativa define a sustentabilidade nos negócios

Professores participantes do Projeto Aprendendo com a Árvore (PACA)

A empresa de papel e embalagens WestRock é uma gigante em seu mercado – com mais de 14 bilhões de faturamento global, a companhia vem apresentando boa saúde financeira nos últimos anos. A sustentabilidade nos negócios está intimamente ligada à preocupação com a sua cadeia de fornecedores, clientes e comunidades nos entornos das fábricas da empresa. Entrevistamos Cynthia Wolgien, gerente de Comunicação Corporativa e Responsabilidade Social da WestRock no Brasil, que fala sobre os programas comunitários da companhia e sua visão de futuro.

– Conte um pouco sobre o envolvimento da WestRock com projetos de sustentabilidade.

Trabalho há seis anos à frente da área de comunicação externa e responsabilidade social e na WestRock as duas áreas estão intimamente ligadas. A sustentabilidade sempre esteve nas nossas práticas e, à medida que o mundo foi avançando, a empresa foi evoluindo com elas. Nos últimos anos passou a pensar de maneira mais centralizada nas diversas dimensões da sustentabilidade e esse ano será o primeiro que lançará relatório de sustentabilidade, alinhado com relatório global que a empresa lançou no ano passado. No Brasil, nossas empresa é de capital fechado e não tem obrigação de lançar relatório de sustentabilidade nos padrões para investidores. Por isso temos a liberdade de falar para outros stakeholders, comunidades, clientes, sem o viés da obrigação. O que norteia o nosso trabalho são os três pilares que chamamos de PPP: Pessoas, Planeta e Performance.

– Quais são as regiões do País onde estão concentrados os programas de RSC?

A grande maioria das ações de RSC estão no entorno das unidades da empresa no Brasil, mais especificamente em Santa Catarina e Paraná, onde temos nossas florestas. Com essas comunidades temos um cuidado especial, fazemos levantamentos e estudos para que nossos projetos sociais tenham impacto onde elas mais precisam. Mas em todo o país temos pelo menos 18 iniciativas voluntárias.

– Você poderia citar um dos projetos de maior relevância na área de sustentabilidade?

Esse ano estamos trabalhando com as necessidades das comunidades de maneira profunda e de forma inteligente, para entender seus anseios e saber como eles se encaixam com o que a empresa acredita antes de implementar programas. Uma das iniciativas é o Projeto Aprendendo com a Árvore (PACA), que está em sua 23a edição e capacita professores da rede pública com temas que sempre estiveram relacionadas com a agenda da ONU. Há dois dois anos, fizemos o lançamento do programa com os 17 objetivos de desenvolvimento sustentável, para apresentá-los de maneira mais geral. No ano passado, trabalhou vida terrestre, objetivo 15, e esse ano falou da água, objetivo 6. No total, aproximadamente 200 professores são capacitados por ano, muitos deles provenientes de municípios carentes, sem acesso a material didático para implementar os projetos. Então a empresa providencia não só o conteúdo, mas promove o debate e doa o material para implementação do projeto na escola. Nosso objetivo é chegar às crianças, para que elas cresçam mais conscientes e ambientalmente responsáveis. É longo prazo, e que levem esse conhecimento para casa, sendo agentes de transformação e questionamento.

– Por que a sustentabilidade pode ser um bom negócio?

Dentro da filosofia do PPP, todas essas ações darão sustentabilidade ao negócio ao longo do tempo. A performance é a saúde financeira que, globalmente, é voltada ao investidor. No Brasil, pensamos performance como ter um negócio rentável que seja sustentável para pagar fornecedores e reinvestir no que acredita. Nosso compromisso vai além das nossas operações – temos um código de conduta para fornecedores para que eles cumpram metas de integridade, bem-estar dos funcionários e segurança.

– Qual é a sua visão de futuro para a responsabilidade social corporativa na empresa?

Nosso desejo é continuar sendo uma das empresas que mais inova e traz soluções para o cliente mas pensando desde o ponto de vista da floresta, passando pela fábrica de papel e chegando no papelão ondulado, que é nosso maior negócio. Queremos inovar de maneira responsável e comprometida, para minimizar impactos. Além disso, buscamos envolver funcionários, fornecedores, clientes e comunidades, para trabalhar sempre com esse viés de sustentabilidade mais holístico.

Horyou apoia as iniciativas de inovação social que ajudam o mundo a alcançar os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, e é organizadora do SIGEF, o Fórum de Inovação Social e Ética Global. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

Em São Paulo, jovens da comunidade do bairro de Pedreira colocam mãos à obra em programas de aprendizado em sintonia com as demandas do mercado de trabalho

Projeto é voltado a adolescentes de 14 a 17 anos

Conhecido pelos desafios econômicos e sociais, o bairro de Pedreira, na zona Sul de São Paulo, consta na lista dos distrito com os menores índices de desenvolvimento humano (IDH) da cidade. Nesse contexto, a vida pode ser dura para os jovens: longe dos principais centros empregadores e com pouco acesso à educação de qualidade, eles se encontram limitados em suas opções de carreira.

Pensando em dar mais alternativas a adolescentes de 14 a 17 anos, o projeto Área 21, uma parceria entre o Instituto Tellus, a Brasilprev e o Conselho Estadual dos Direitos da Criana e do Adolescente, vem oferecendo formação na área de tecnologia e empreendedorismo. O projeto, que conta com metodologia inovadora e um laboratório onde os alunos podem exercer sua criatividade usando ferramentas como impressoras 3D e equipamentos de realidade virtual, foi lançado este mês e já tem 320 inscritos.

A estrutura do programa lembra a de muitas escolas inovadoras de empreendedorismo: o Área 21 usa técnicas de design thinking e gamificação para que os alunos aprendam a solucionar problemas. O desafio final é criar um protótipo de start up.

Objetivo do programa é ser um laboratório de empreendedorismo e inovação

Uma das apoiadoras do Área 21 é a seguradora Brasilprev, que tem como objetivo unir sustentabilidade à inovação. «Esperamos que as experiências e interações vividas por eles ao longo do projeto os deixem mais bem preparados para entrar no mercado de trabalho, não eó em relação aos conhecimentos técnicos mas também nas competências comportamentais», afirma Cinthia Spanó, gerente de Comunicação Corporativa e Sustentabilidade da Brasilprev.

A gerente explica que a empresa se envolve há muitos anos com projetos sociais e de desenvolvimento comunitário, como a Fábrica de Ideias, que também apoia a ascensão profissional de adolescentes em situação de vulnerabilidade e risco social. O projeto, realizado em parceria com o Instituto Reciclar, ajuda o jovem a escolher sua profissão e a desenvolver suas competências socioemocionais.

Diversos estudos sobre o trabalho do futuro vêm apontando que as carreiras das próximas gerações exigirão mais competências comportamentais e menos conhecimentos técnicos, já que estes estarão sempre mudando e se atualizando. “No século 21, vivemos a inclusão de diversas tecnologias, e o jovem precisa, acima de tudo, se preparar e aprender a enfrentar novos desafios. É importante que ele não tenha medo de resolver problemas”, afirma Henrique José dos Santos Dias, um dos educadores da Área 21.

Horyou apoia as iniciativas de inovação social que ajudam o mundo a alcançar os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, e é organizadora do SIGEF, o Fórum de Inovação Social e Ética Global. Seja a mudança, seja Horyou!

More Stories

Una referencia en arte urbano en Barcelona, Nau Bostik tiene una historia que remite al pasado industrial de la ciudad – la nave abandonada...